#1
Hey guys,

I've been vaguely self teaching myself since buying a travel sized kit off a mate for £30.

At the moment i'm at uni, with no access to a drum kit, but have cushions and 2 kick pedals and sticks. Any recommendations of useful exercises to do?

EDIT: I can play a basic 4/4 beat of:


BEAT:  1 - 2 - 3 - 4 -
Kick:  x - - - x - - -
hat:   x - x - x - x -
Snare: - - x - - - x -


with various (albeit simple) variations

EDIT2: I came at guitar from a theory perspective - i'm not quite sure how to approach drums, my major scale is useless here...

EDIT3: my main genre is rock + prog, but i think it's probably best to ignore rush for now until i get white stripes down
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
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Last edited by doive at May 11, 2011,
#2
I'd get yourself a practice pad and just practice rudiments and stuff on it, not much else you can do unless you get on a real kit.

Edit - Rudiments are stuff like drum rolls, this guy shows loads of them here, but start of with some basic ones.

http://www.youtube.com/user/DrumRudiments

Just use a metronome to build up speed with all of them

Edit2- Do you have access to the travel kit? I'm a bit confused
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Last edited by Skinny91 at May 11, 2011,
#3
so on here: http://drumrudiments.com/

There are about 40 different rudiments. What ones should i focus on? stuff like the single stroke 7 sounds like it's not too useful outside metal for example (e.g. the breakdown of "one")
or should I try to do them all? doing one with a metronome for 5 minutes and moving on to the next?
Should I practice those with practicing kick on a cushion to improve my co-ordination? Should my foot just beat out straight 4's for now?
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#4
Definitely get a practice pad and practice rudiments.

You can make a pretty simple bass drum by getting cardboard box, cutting out a small hole at the bottom and clipping the bass pedal to it. (Sounds stupid but it works).
Then you can use the practice pad as a snare and then a few pillows for cymbals etc.
#5
^ yer at the moment i have a pillow case with a sheet of cardboard in it :p

My travel kit is at home, I'm at uni minus travel kit (it says "travel size" but that shit don't fit on a train...)

At the moment i have a practice pad that looks something like this: http://thumbs4.ebaystatic.com/m/mbx2J0Pu_XBFC9wdGQsP88w/140.jpg but no stand or anything so it just falls off my desk should I just check ebay for a cheap practice pad i can put on a desk?
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#6
I would start of with the basics, so Single Stroke Roll, Double Stroke Roll, and the Single Paradiddle, and once your doubles have improved more on to the rolls and double and triple paradiddles, then try flams, and after that you should be alright learning most of the others

I've got a guide in the FAQ thread, but it hasn't been organized properly yet, I'll try and find it and link it to you.

As for 7 strokes, they are used in all types of music and not just metal, as the One drum beat is based of a marching band rhythm

Edit - You can get practice pads that attach to camera tripod-stand type things, so this is what you'll want to get if possible.
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Last edited by Skinny91 at May 11, 2011,
#7
You can practice your independence/coordination anywhere really, you don't even need sticks, the actual kit dynamic only reaaaaally comes into play with things like speed (moving around the kit and stuff) and using everything for textures and melodies and stuff. Also, developing your hands is very important and you can actually do it on pillows too, I'd recommend doing that once your technique is coming together a bit more.

Some basic ones would be stuff like playing 8th notes (alternating, so RLRL etc.) with your hands and then playing your right and left feet alternating on the quarter notes. And playing the basic rock beat with various added notes is also quite helpful.
Last edited by Steve08 at May 11, 2011,
#8
Cool. This is really useful guys thanks

I have been trying to practice co-ordination a fair bit when around the house just wiggling my hands - but now exams are coming up i tend to be in one place a lot and in need of revision breaks :p

At the moment the slipper on my desk seems to be working, but I will get hold of a practice pad as this slipper isn't so responsive (and is not looking a bit sad :P

Am I better practising with a metronome or to songs? I would guess metronome is better, but songs are less dull so perhaps i'll do more unless it's a bad idea?
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#9
Both is good, it'll make it less dull, but when learning rudiments its good to just use a metronome. Once you can play them it's fine practicing them to songs

Edit - But I will say its better to use a metronome to keep track of your improvement.
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Last edited by Skinny91 at May 11, 2011,
#10
Cool - will do.

Should I try and push my speed, or be comfortable? I can play basic rudiments happily at 120 at the mo, should i look to push that to 130 over a few weeks or just get awesome at playing at 120?
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#11
Quote by doive
Cool - will do.

Should I try and push my speed, or be comfortable? I can play basic rudiments happily at 120 at the mo, should i look to push that to 130 over a few weeks or just get awesome at playing at 120?

Hey Doive, how long ago have you started? What rudiments are you playing at 120 BPM?
I'm playing quiet comfortable at 100 BPM the quadruple single stroke rudiment (I think that's what it was called... I mean 4 strikes per beat). Just started 2 days ago.
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#12
Quote by doive
Cool. This is really useful guys thanks

I have been trying to practice co-ordination a fair bit when around the house just wiggling my hands - but now exams are coming up i tend to be in one place a lot and in need of revision breaks :p

At the moment the slipper on my desk seems to be working, but I will get hold of a practice pad as this slipper isn't so responsive (and is not looking a bit sad :P

Am I better practising with a metronome or to songs? I would guess metronome is better, but songs are less dull so perhaps i'll do more unless it's a bad idea?
Playing to songs for fun (or to learn) is okay. Playing to them solely for the purpose of practice is silly, though. For actually practicing technique/developing speed then you definitely want to use a metronome.

Also, for improving the speed of your hands I'd recommend playing at 120 for the moment, but do so as loudly as possible and for long periods of time (several minutes). And with proper technique, of course
#14
Quote by doive
Cool - will do.

Should I try and push my speed, or be comfortable? I can play basic rudiments happily at 120 at the mo, should i look to push that to 130 over a few weeks or just get awesome at playing at 120?


As long as you feel comfortable and nothing should feel forced, then its fine to start taking up the tempo. Just don't go up by to much, just a few bpm at a time.
Spiraling Up Through the Crack in the Sky...

...Leaving Material World Behind...


SOUNDCLOUD

GT - Elite Curbstomp
#15
Hey man.

I started to play drums seriously on March, 2010. I've never had a drumkit, but I own a practice pad since last christmas.

I would recommend you the same method I used to learn: air drum, or play the patterns you want to learn on a practice pad. Both hands on the pad, and move your feet properly.

I know it sounds completely stupid, but I started hitting my legs as a way to learn. That way, I always knew if I was off-beat.

Anyway, if you're interested in this method, just tell me and I'll explain more. It worked for me.

EDIT: NEVER underestimate the Holy Rudiments. You don't stop until you are able to play them with your feet. And then combine them. Shit sounds good.
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Last edited by NUMAS at May 12, 2011,