#1
So about the only scale im really familiar with is the blues penta.
But when im piddleing around it sounds like garbage (98% of the time).
And when I make tunes in my head the notes dont fit in the blues scale shapes when i try to play them. So the question is really: How do you know what notes to play?

And yes the ones that sound 'right', but do I just link techniques and notes together and randomly piddle?
Im kinda frustrated. I read all sorts of theory on intervals and how to build chords and arpeggios, scales, etc AND use an interval ear trainer.
I just dont get it. I need guidance.
Pls help. Am willing to read and practice like nuts.
#2
you don't need to use the blues pentatonic to play blues, play what you hear in your head, whether it's right on paper or not. IF it sounds good, it's all you need
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#3
How about playing a simple 12 bar blues shuffle first, get that going, then add some notes from the minor penta scale. Keep that shuffle going then slide into and out of your extra notes. Keep it simple on E or A, your penta scale is right there. Now your jamin now your havin fun. Cheers
#4
Well said. I just piddled a bit taking your advice and using my 'incorrect' notes for the licks my mind makes up and it was 1000% better. I was overthinking I guess, and trying to play trapped in a stupid box. Lol. Still a long way to go... But my mind is a wee bit calmer thinking about it.
#5
Quote by tuxs
How about playing a simple 12 bar blues shuffle first, get that going, then add some notes from the minor penta scale. Keep that shuffle going then slide into and out of your extra notes. Keep it simple on E or A, your penta scale is right there. Now your jamin now your havin fun. Cheers


Im on it! Sounds fun.
#6
Quote by DimebagZappa
Well said. I just piddled a bit taking your advice and using my 'incorrect' notes for the licks my mind makes up and it was 1000% better. I was overthinking I guess, and trying to play trapped in a stupid box. Lol. Still a long way to go... But my mind is a wee bit calmer thinking about it.



seriously, I know some guys will adamantly fight me on this, but as long as you know the notes on the fretboard and some note relationships and shapes...scales aren't necessary. I don't know any scales other than a pentatonic and I can improvise to practically anything(and not that beginning improv stuff either )

Personally for me, I find that many people who follow the scale patterns get stuck and they can't deviate from it. So even if you don't agree with me, do what you need to make it sound good, don't put barriers on yourself, it only makes it harder to compose
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Anyway I have technically statutory raped #nice

Quote by EndThecRinge51
once a girl and i promised to never leave each other

since that promise was broken

i dont make promises any more
#7
Well megano 28 you say you dont know any scales but penta, but you can improvise anything.
I say you are playing other scales but you just dont know it. But you are right some people do get stuck going up and down the same scales. I think to many students put to much time into scales and riffs and not enough into the rhythm and the groove and surely thats what its all about.
Hey cheers have a good one.
#8
Quote by tuxs
Well megano 28 you say you dont know any scales but penta, but you can improvise anything.
I say you are playing other scales but you just dont know it. But you are right some people do get stuck going up and down the same scales. I think to many students put to much time into scales and riffs and not enough into the rhythm and the groove and surely thats what its all about.
Hey cheers have a good one.



when I said scales I meant positions and scale shapes on the fretboard. Of course I know how to play in key, my point was that in learning the differences between note distances and the sound it'll produce, I don't need to know the positions to let's say a C# Minor scale in order to play it a C# Minor lick.

All in all, music is a language. You can go to school and learn it 'properly', or you can practice at home/with peers until you've picked up enough to master it.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
Anyway I have technically statutory raped #nice

Quote by EndThecRinge51
once a girl and i promised to never leave each other

since that promise was broken

i dont make promises any more
#9
Yep you can practise at home, but you will always have a different dialick. And very hard for other
musican's to play with you. Bit like Jimmy Hendrix aye. Cheers
#10
Quote by tuxs
Yep you can practise at home, but you will always have a different dialick. And very hard for other
musican's to play with you. Bit like Jimmy Hendrix aye. Cheers



not really, I've jammed with random musicians quite easily. I have a good amount of knowledge when it comes to making progressions and my versatility is a huge plus, as I can jump into any progression by just listening to it for a few bars, unlike other trained musicians who need to know the key beforehand
Quote by EndTheRapture51
Anyway I have technically statutory raped #nice

Quote by EndThecRinge51
once a girl and i promised to never leave each other

since that promise was broken

i dont make promises any more
#11
Quote by DimebagZappa
So about the only scale im really familiar with is the blues penta.
But when im piddleing around it sounds like garbage (98% of the time).
And when I make tunes in my head the notes dont fit in the blues scale shapes when i try to play them. So the question is really: How do you know what notes to play?

And yes the ones that sound 'right', but do I just link techniques and notes together and randomly piddle?
Im kinda frustrated. I read all sorts of theory on intervals and how to build chords and arpeggios, scales, etc AND use an interval ear trainer.
I just dont get it. I need guidance.
Pls help. Am willing to read and practice like nuts.

Nope, that's absolutely what you don't do.

You need to have an idea in your head of the sound you want, you won't get much out of just trying to play as that's akin to hoping the guitar will make the music for you.

The guitar's just a tool, if you don't know what you want to create with it then yes, more than likely you'll end up with a mess. Theory will help as that gives you some structure regarding how notes work together and what tends to sound "good", but ultimately it all starts with you. As far as "knowing" goes, well that comes from experience, from listneing to lots of music, learning lots of music and in doing so learning what other people have done to make a certain sound. You need to get yourself into the habit of thinking musically, it doesn't matter if the notes you think of don't "fit in a shape", shapes don't mean anything. Also I'm betting you've learned one shape of the minor pentatonic rather than the whole scale, in which case the notes you've been choosing mayh well fit in that scale, just on a different part of the fretboard.
Actually called Mark!

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#12
Quote by steven seagull

You need to have an idea in your head of the sound you want, you won't get much out of just trying to play as that's akin to hoping the guitar will make the music for you.


Well said!

I think what it comes down to is: training your ears and hands to work together. You need to get to the stage where you can hear something in your head and then translate that to the fretboard. Scales are just guides (i.e. sets of notes that work over certain chords/in certain keys), they can't tell you how to play a melody.

Try singing (yes, singing) the notes you want, and then trying to match them on the fretboard- it'll take time to master but it's much more melodic to sing (or think) a melody (and then match it) than to play a shape on the guitar neck.
#13
If I am jamming in Em I just play all along the neck and just watch out for that F#
I don't use positions anymore, well at least not that often.
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#14
Quote by steven seagull
Nope, that's absolutely what you don't do.

You need to have an idea in your head of the sound you want, you won't get much out of just trying to play as that's akin to hoping the guitar will make the music for you.

The guitar's just a tool, if you don't know what you want to create with it then yes, more than likely you'll end up with a mess. Theory will help as that gives you some structure regarding how notes work together and what tends to sound "good", but ultimately it all starts with you. As far as "knowing" goes, well that comes from experience, from listneing to lots of music, learning lots of music and in doing so learning what other people have done to make a certain sound. You need to get yourself into the habit of thinking musically, it doesn't matter if the notes you think of don't "fit in a shape", shapes don't mean anything. Also I'm betting you've learned one shape of the minor pentatonic rather than the whole scale, in which case the notes you've been choosing mayh well fit in that scale, just on a different part of the fretboard.


Nah man, I know the positions and formulas for blues, minor pent, and major scale.
Just wasnt playing what my mind had mapped out, i was trying to just play something without thinking about what I want it to sound like.
Imma just hum some stuff and transpose it now.