#1
I love playing blues, funk, soul, gospel, country, and jazz. I even play a little bit of Worship for mass and such things. One thing though, that I love about the music I play is that it's very "jam based."

Now I love Alternative music (wallflowers, White Stripes, Modest Mouse, Mumford and Sons, KoL, Arctic Monkeys, and Arcade fire etc.) the thing about that music is that it seems like it would be so hard to sit down and write, yet it seems very far from "jam based" you can't have a standard chord progression (i.e. 145) throughout the song and have solo breaks that fit anywhere. This is just the way it seems to me. Do other people think so too? if not, what is some suggested listening for songwriting inspiration.
- Cody


Quote by Ninja Vampirate
What a faggot, do a few lines of cocaine and have a shot of whiskey or 5 if you want to study right
#3
Use this stuff with some scale that fits the chords

- legato
- string bends
- tapping
- sweeps???
- harmonics
and more...
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#4
Quote by Freepower
Sorry, I have no idea what you're asking.

If you want to improvise over that sort of music it's just the same ol' Major, Minor and pentatonics almost every time.
This.

I guarantee you, every single one of those "alternative" (which honestly means nothing to me in terms of genre) bands you're talking about can be jammed on just as easily as any of those other genres. Their songs might be structured differently (i.e. it's not like jazz, where you play through the head, then go into improvised choruses), but I guarantee you that these bands ad-lib just as much as those other genres.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylDb4wnjIzc
Straight blues. This proves to you that classifying most of those bands as "alternative," thus alienating them from genres like jazz/blues/funk isn't really fair.

Honestly, you're talking about having "standard chord progressions," but most of these bands use progressions that are about as standard as they come.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at May 12, 2011,
#5
alright thanks guys, sounds good. I more meant standard chord progressions like 12 bar blues, 251, 1645 etc. It just seems that creativity is emphasised so much that live, it would seem hard to stray from the record. Well thanks for the help guys.
- Cody


Quote by Ninja Vampirate
What a faggot, do a few lines of cocaine and have a shot of whiskey or 5 if you want to study right
#6
alright thanks guys, sounds good. I more meant standard chord progressions like 12 bar blues, 251, 1645 etc. It just seems that creativity is emphasised so much that live, it would seem hard to stray from the record. Well thanks for the help guys.


I could see that for a group like the strokes or arcade fire (though, due to a singer completely FU CKING me at one show and blanking on the lyrics to wake up, by the arcade fire, and we--the instrumentalists-- went through the song as a jam--playing the wo-oh-woh-oh-oh-oh riff on guitar, and alternating solos with a bass player, which was a lot of fun, but also really aggrivating). If your into the white stripes, you should really check out what they do live---there entire show is almost entirely improvised. they go through songs, but have no set list, and jack white does a lot of improvising (solos, riffs, lead ins in between songs, quoting one song in the middle of another), both in terms of soloing, and completely changing the form of a song--shortening, it, adding verses, or even parts of other songs.
and theres tons of standard chord progressions--though often groups like the strokes or arcade fire will use non standard chord voicings (but the progression is still intact--listen to the bass to figure out the chords, don't worry about the guitar voicing).
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#7
Many improvisational actors/ improvisers also work as scripted actors, and "improv" techniques are often taught in standard acting classes. The basic skills of listening, clarity, confidence, and performing instinctively and spontaneously are considered important skills for actors to develop and also Proactive Strategies for Healthy Musicianship.