#1
I don't know if this is the right place to post this but this is the story.
I work as a sound tech for my school and they have been wanting to add wireless instruments. They want to use the existing wireless set up which uses mini xlr's that plug into a wireless box emitter. These mini xlr's (female) have 3 receivers and go to a mic. We bought cables that are Mini xlr and go to 1/8 mm instrument cable. the only problem is that these new cables have 4 receivers instead of three, and when we plug them in we barely get any sound from it. is there a home fix for this or are the new cables a waste of time?
#2
Quote by Cbolthouse
I don't know if this is the right place to post this but this is the story.
I work as a sound tech for my school and they have been wanting to add wireless instruments. They want to use the existing wireless set up which uses mini xlr's that plug into a wireless box emitter. These mini xlr's (female) have 3 receivers and go to a mic. We bought cables that are Mini xlr and go to 1/8 mm instrument cable. the only problem is that these new cables have 4 receivers instead of three, and when we plug them in we barely get any sound from it. is there a home fix for this or are the new cables a waste of time?

I'm afraid I'm not quite following... 'these mini XLR's have 3 receivers' - do you mean they have 3 pins, split 3-ways for 3 emitters, or something else entirely?
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#3
a normal xlr has 3 pins for the male and 3 receivers(for the pins) on the female side. our mini xlr's have 4 pin receivers. like a normal xlr but with a hole in the middle of the other 3
#4
1/8mm? That's a pretty small cable . Surely you mean 1/8", and even then probably 1/4" if you're talking about instrument cables.

There shouldn't be a problem connecting mini-XLR4 (F) to a mini-XLR3 (M) since pin 4 won't be connected to anything. Likely your sound issue is coming from having the transmitter and receiver setup for mic levels (low-z) as opposed to instrument levels (high-z). In most wireless units, this can be switched on the transmitter and receiver.
#5
Quote by Cbolthouse
a normal xlr has 3 pins for the male and 3 receivers(for the pins) on the female side. our mini xlr's have 4 pin receivers. like a normal xlr but with a hole in the middle of the other 3

Ah ok, well I know that wireless units do have different connections (presumably because they need a channel to carry an additional 'carrier signal' or something for when the signal is emitted/received wirelessly) so that could be part of the problem. When it comes to things like this, I'd always aim to get the proper replacement part/same spec. of part used.

Sorry I can't help more, but it would certainly appear to be the problem - the only XLR cable with four wires (that I know of) is Starquad, but I believe (never seen it in person) it still uses a 3-pin connection, with two wires for the two live pins and the shield connected to the ground pin.

If you want a longer cable or anything, try contacting the manufacturer to see if they can help you find something suitable.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#6
Quote by take_it_t
1/8mm? That's a pretty small cable . Surely you mean 1/8", and even then probably 1/4" if you're talking about instrument cables.

There shouldn't be a problem connecting mini-XLR4 (F) to a mini-XLR3 (M) since pin 4 won't be connected to anything. Likely your sound issue is coming from having the transmitter and receiver setup for mic levels (low-z) as opposed to instrument levels (high-z). In most wireless units, this can be switched on the transmitter and receiver.

Thanks I'll try that and see if it works