#1
Hey, with regards to right hand technique......

We have movement at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist, which is within accepted normal motions (some pro players insist on only moving the wrist, but others manage fine using the elbow and shoulder too and recommend this)

But I'd like to know the pros or cons of moving the Thumb and Index finger for fast alternate picking? I'm sure I've seen or read somewhere that someone said this is big no. Recently I saw a pro talking about keeping the hand itself completely frozen (relaxed but frozen in terms of movement) and all the movement coming from the wrist and elbow etc itself.

After analysis I've found that I have been moving my thumb and index finger mildly within my alternate picking, and I'm not sure whether this is good or not for fast efficient motions.

Your thoughts please.
Last edited by Jonashred at May 12, 2011,
#2
Im not really sure, however I am a firm believer that you should keep all your picking action from your wrist. I saw a video of someone who took picking by moving his thumb and index finger to the extreme, and it looked very uncomfortable/stressful.
#3
your shoulder and elbow should rarely move if ever. moving the elow can cause tennis elbow (painful and can take you out of the game from anywhere from a few months to life), you can also pull muscles in your shoulder and back from shoulder movement.

there is also much less stress from moving just your wrist, and using just your fingers can give you a different tone, but I personally won't use it because I have not been able to figure out how to play that way without feeling too much tension, which is usually the sign of injuries to come.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#4
Personally I don't think the thumb and finger should be the main source of picking motion (too weak, too small a range of motion), but adjusting pick angle and attack can be done with small motions of the thumb and finger - I wouldn't "lock" them.