#1
I'm interested in getting monitors in the near future to help me improve my mixes. As far as I know there pretty vital right? Anyways I'm wondering how you would set them up. Would I need a sound card such as the Prosonus Firebox?

I just need to know roughly how much it will cost to get a good entry level pair of monitors set up. Would a good quality pair of headphones be a good alternative in the mean time? Thanks guys!
#2
monitors will be better then headphones unless they are monitor headphones. you can spsend $120 on some good used ones. you dont need to have the best of the best of the best, plus if you can make it sound good on bad speakers or in a car then you are doing something right. one recording guru taught me to mix one with monitors and one with a bad pair or speakers to make it sound best. ill try to find out those monitors my friend got for $120 but by the time im back you will probably have 9 suggestions
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#3
I would say look to spend 3-400 on a fair entry level pair. And yes, you'll connect them through an interface such as that one.
#4
Get a USB or Firewire recording interface. They usually have 2 balanced outs for monitors. Use Balanced cabe to hook them up, as this will help minimize noise. As far as monitors go, there are many options. I bought a pair of KRK rokit 5 at $150 a piece. They're not bad. I hear decent things about Yamaha HS50, and Mackie MR5mk2. These are all around $300 for the pair. If you have a larger budget, you can start to go into the realm of Focals or Dynaudio which will cost $1000 for a pair.

Yamaha NS-10s are fun too.

Keep in mind, monitors are only as good as the environment they're placed in. Placement in the room is crucial. You also have to worry about first reflections and bass response. You can find this info somewhere on that internet thing.

Headphones are okay, but they can be fatiguing and not have super-accurate frequency response (as they usually exaggerate the low-end). Hope this helps!!
#6
Quote by Arcadiagrooves
Anyone have anything to say about the Shure SRH440s? I'm interested in them as well.


Headphones are really only good to reference and maybe make small changes on (I like to edit with them). You can't really mix on them because to don't get the phase information you need to accurately set levels and their frequency response isn't as accurate.
#7
Quote by MacFamousKid
Get a USB or Firewire recording interface. They usually have 2 balanced outs for monitors. Use Balanced cabe to hook them up, as this will help minimize noise. As far as monitors go, there are many options. I bought a pair of KRK rokit 5 at $150 a piece. They're not bad. I hear decent things about Yamaha HS50, and Mackie MR5mk2. These are all around $300 for the pair. If you have a larger budget, you can start to go into the realm of Focals or Dynaudio which will cost $1000 for a pair.

Yamaha NS-10s are fun too.

Keep in mind, monitors are only as good as the environment they're placed in. Placement in the room is crucial. You also have to worry about first reflections and bass response. You can find this info somewhere on that internet thing.

Headphones are okay, but they can be fatiguing and not have super-accurate frequency response (as they usually exaggerate the low-end). Hope this helps!!

You're on the right lines, but it sounds like you're regurgitating something you've read elsewhere and haven't quite experienced this enough to understand 100%.

I'd say the biggest reasons not to use headphones are the hugely-exaggerated stereo image which makes panning/spatial positioning a lot harder; and the difficulty of finding a pair with anything resembling a flat frequency response.

As for monitors... the reason it sounds like you're not sure what you're aiming for is because you mentioned NS-10s... I think that nearly every person on here that recommends NS-10s should be forced by law to explain what makes NS-10s so prized, and if they can't they should admit their opinion is redundant. NS-10s are completely different to the other monitors you mentioned (as NS-10s are a sealed-box design, and all the others are more modern, ported enclosures) and thus while you might expect the Yamaha HS series to sound very similar (hey, Yamaha's pr hype tries to fool everyone into thinking this!) they are incredibly different.

I mean, you mention bass response... NS-10s have a very high-passed frequency response compared to the other speakers, much closer to 85-90Hz at the -3dB point. This is down to the sealed box design, and yet the same design creating this supposed 'flaw' also means the time-domain response of NS-10s is immaculate compared to the relatively-smeared sound of any ported design. In short, NS-10s are so desired for their tight and accurate midrange. You don't need to have speakers that go down to 30Hz with a sub in addition to mix the average record... it just feels comforting to hear what's going on down there (some genres are an exception).

The other reason NS-10s are infamous, however, is the same reason Marshall amps and Fender guitars and Adidas trainers are so prized... because people jumped on the bandwagon in unanimous backing of one particular product, making it the 'standard'.


Sorry to come off as an arse, just thought you might be inspired to research monitor speaker designs etc. if I brought it up, and then you yourself would find the sound/type you like and not confuse designs that are very different!
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#9
Actually, I do know from experience.

I've been mixing an album for the past few weeks. I've been monitoring on large Genelec's for most of it. However, I did a complete mix on NS-10s, and it was the most cohesive and translatable mix I've done. They are fatiguing, and definitely not a main monitor, but they are useful. That's why I said "fun," not good.

I just figured the guy asking a question didn't want a history lesson, but rather some useful suggestions. My bad.
Last edited by MacFamousKid at May 12, 2011,
#10
Quote by cadred
Woot has the M-Audio AV40's Reference Speakers for $89 (refurbished), today only.

http://www.woot.com/


The problem with those speakers...
They are not monitors and are not meant for use as monitors.
They are PC speakers like what you can get at Futureshop or Best Buy and places of the like.
From what I've read about them, they seem to have a bad frequency response that is not flat.

TS, I've done quite a bit of research as I'm looking for some new monitors myself. Where I am the Mackie Mark II's seem to be the best for the price. I can get them for $350 in Canada but I've seen them for, if I remember correctly $240 at zZounds.
I've heard good things about the KRK Rokkits but I personally couldn't use them. The yellow cone would distract me, that's just me though.
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