#1
Had another go at recording today since I had some spare time and I got this. I know the guitar sound's not great at all, it's something I've been wanting to improve for a while, but not quite sure how. It's a shame because you can't really appreciate the chord sequences as well you should since you can't really hear the chords. The bass is just a midi file imported into Reason, it does a decent job. Oh and I'm aware of the really bad sounding pinched harmonic in the intro after the clean guitar stops.

I plan to eventually put vocals on this, as I do with all my music, I've actually got a vocal melody written for this, just need to get the time to write the lyrics. c4c as well.

http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/Seb1uk/

It's rock 198.
Last edited by Seb1uk at May 12, 2011,
#2
I liked the song a lot. I think some panning of your guitar tracks would really help with the clarity; I really love when you can hear all the different parts together, but right now they're just all slammed together in the middle. Try putting your main rhythm tracks at 100% L/R and then spreading the lead parts between 50 and center with any solo type thing in the center.
#3
Thanks, yeah I was going to do some panning stuff actually but I didn't really have the time today and I just wanted to get a decent piece of work out by tonight. Hopefully I'll get back to this some time soon.
#4
Hey man, thanks for the crit. This doesn't sound bad at all. I like the way the guitars work together, though they could definitely be panned out. Also, the fact that you're clipping the shit of out it doesn't help, and the sort of compression going on just totally wrecks the drum track. If you're concerned about hearing specific things like the rhythm guitar, back everything waaay down and then start one by one, making sure they all have their own space and place within the mix. I think it's a great start. Just remember that volume maximization comes AFTER the mix : )
#5
Ahh right, thanks for the tips! You think you could elaborate on 'making sure they all have their own space and place within the mix'?

Oh and I never quite realised how bad it was clipping until I put my headphones on today D:
Last edited by Seb1uk at May 13, 2011,
#6
Sure. So every instrument occupies a certain amount of "space" within the mix, right? Usually, this "space" can be divided up into two categories: the "location" it is in the mix, and the frequency range it's most occupying. So in a stereo mix, you've really only technically got left, right, and center as far as "location" goes. This is panning -- pretty simple. When you mix in 5.1, you've got essentially 6 locations to put the sound. The frequency range has to do with the instruments. So with bass guitar, it's obviously going to occupy a lot of the low end. AND, low frequencies are notoriously hard to shift around, so it's probably going to sit really close to the middle (in a standard mix). Can you think of something else that's probably going to be low and sit in the middle of the mix? Kick drum, exactly. Boom. So if you're wanting to hear the clarity in your rhythm guitar, the least productive thing you can do is try to make it occupy that same location and frequency space. Dial back the bass a bit and put it somewhere else in the mix, say panned 40% left. Ok, but now you want to hear it equally from both sides. No problem, just track it again and pan it 40% to the right. Or maybe you like the sound of "stereo spreading," which is essentially playing the various frequencies of a signal at various locations throughout the mix, so you 100-250hz may be hard left and your 250-400hz hard right and so on and so forth. But if we're talking standard stuff here, track the guitar again and put it somewhere else in the mix. It's a really good idea to build the mix up like this and think of where you can "put" things. The lead guitar could fit perfectly fine in the middle of the mix, since it's not trying to fight with the low frequencies already there (kick and bass). Drums are pretty difficult too since they essentially occupy every frequency range from kick to bright and shiny overheads. Which is why it's so important you make sure you put the drums exactly where they should be and spread out things like overheads through a good stereo image. Again, this is just kind of the basic stuff. There are plenty of exceptions to the rules, but this is where you start. Also, most mix engineers and producers will build their mix up leaving a specific amount of space dead center from around 400hz-2k for a strong vocal performance. That's what they talk about when they say the vocal should "sit" in the mix. You've built up this nice sort of bowl of sounds all around, and then you just place the vocal right there, and nothing is fighting with it. Kind of cool, yeah?
#7
The track is excellent, but is really does need the panning done. I'd say rhythm should be about 70% left/right, leads 30-40% left/right and drums in the middle. Really awesome song though. Looking forward to hearing it completed with vocals.

Crit for crit?
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1441385
#8
Ok fun intro, we like the really noisy shit goin on. The tone on the lead guitar is a bit generic but whatevre it cool if you just wanna fit in. We really like how hectic this shit is. It jus is a total **** YOU we arent stopping. Has the rawness with punk with a little extra flare. You need to pan the instruments and maybe mess with EQ so they can get some space, it feels a bit clashy right now.

Great job be proud


Show the luv back

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1440810
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#10
Quote by jables23092
Sure. So every instrument occupies a certain amount of "space" within the mix, right? Usually, this "space" can be divided up into two categories: the "location" it is in the mix, and the frequency range it's most occupying. So in a stereo mix, you've really only technically got left, right, and center as far as "location" goes. This is panning -- pretty simple. When you mix in 5.1, you've got essentially 6 locations to put the sound. The frequency range has to do with the instruments. So with bass guitar, it's obviously going to occupy a lot of the low end. AND, low frequencies are notoriously hard to shift around, so it's probably going to sit really close to the middle (in a standard mix). Can you think of something else that's probably going to be low and sit in the middle of the mix? Kick drum, exactly. Boom. So if you're wanting to hear the clarity in your rhythm guitar, the least productive thing you can do is try to make it occupy that same location and frequency space. Dial back the bass a bit and put it somewhere else in the mix, say panned 40% left. Ok, but now you want to hear it equally from both sides. No problem, just track it again and pan it 40% to the right. Or maybe you like the sound of "stereo spreading," which is essentially playing the various frequencies of a signal at various locations throughout the mix, so you 100-250hz may be hard left and your 250-400hz hard right and so on and so forth. But if we're talking standard stuff here, track the guitar again and put it somewhere else in the mix. It's a really good idea to build the mix up like this and think of where you can "put" things. The lead guitar could fit perfectly fine in the middle of the mix, since it's not trying to fight with the low frequencies already there (kick and bass). Drums are pretty difficult too since they essentially occupy every frequency range from kick to bright and shiny overheads. Which is why it's so important you make sure you put the drums exactly where they should be and spread out things like overheads through a good stereo image. Again, this is just kind of the basic stuff. There are plenty of exceptions to the rules, but this is where you start. Also, most mix engineers and producers will build their mix up leaving a specific amount of space dead center from around 400hz-2k for a strong vocal performance. That's what they talk about when they say the vocal should "sit" in the mix. You've built up this nice sort of bowl of sounds all around, and then you just place the vocal right there, and nothing is fighting with it. Kind of cool, yeah?


Wow thanks for that, and cheers everyone for the crit. Hopefully I'll try and work on the mixing today.
#12
love it man!!! nice work musically this piece is sick, highly energetic and interesting to listen to, you may get sick of hearing this but its amazing what a bit of panning can do to your track!! i learnt this in the same way you are look forward to hearing it with some pan

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1442210 < if you fancy it it would be much appreciated!
#13
Cheers guys. I'm not gonna be able to get back to working on this for another week or so but I'll definitely get on to the panning and all that once I get the chance.