#1
yea its pretty self explanatory..lets say im playin an Eminor chord, but throughout my chord progression i still want to keep that meloncholy/eerie vibe, how do i know which chords are appropriate? thats something i have a difficulty understanding..
#2
This is no help to your real question as i have no clue, but i just go by what sounds right for whats in my head. For instance, since you just said Em...and keeping it melancholy, i messed around and found out Em, C, Am, Em fits my bill. Like i said, not a good answer, and probably not efficient, but it gets me through.
#3
you want a melancholy/eerie vibe? take everything into account. harmony is only the first step. articulations, timbre, and orchestration also play a part in that.

really, i don't know what you're asking. you talk about an E minor chord, but then you bring up a chord progression?

if your ear isn't sufficient, maybe it's time to buckle down and learn (and apply) some theory. and don't forget to train your ear.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#4
Quote by Charley2715
This is no help to your real question as i have no clue, but i just go by what sounds right for whats in my head. For instance, since you just said Em...and keeping it melancholy, i messed around and found out Em, C, Am, Em fits my bill. Like i said, not a good answer, and probably not efficient, but it gets me through.


Well it's sorta relevant, and here's why.

To say a song is in the key of Em (or anything else), it means that it "resolves" or "feels at home" when you play Em. Quite often you'll find that songs will end with the chord that directly relates to it's key, which would be Em in this case.

So we have a song in Em, and you'll be interested to know that there are 7 chords which are created by the scale. For example if I were to write out the E minor scale as so;

E F# G A B C D
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

And say took the E note, and chose the 3rd and 5th notes of this scale to make a chord, I'd get E G and B. An E minor chord.

What if I take the A note? Well 2 along from that is the C note, and two more we go back to the start of the scale (they never end) and we get E. A, C and E = A minor chord.

What about the C? Well there's C, go back to the start again and there's the E, then two more and theres the G note. A C major chord.

Hey guess what? Your chords are E minor, A minor and C major! Wowzers! This is because they are all derived from the key of E minor, so sound great together within that key.

So if you wish to keep all the chords within that key, you should figure out the chords which belong to that key, and keep to those. As for things being eerie, sorry, it's completely up to you how to use them. I can make a happy, sad, angry or eerie song out of the chords given, and so can you.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#5
Quote by killer puppy
yea its pretty self explanatory..lets say im playin an Eminor chord, but throughout my chord progression i still want to keep that meloncholy/eerie vibe, how do i know which chords are appropriate? thats something i have a difficulty understanding..


Theory is a guide to telling you what will sound generally good for the most part. Theory can't tell you "To keep mood X from chord Y you need to do chord Z after". Well, I guess it can... but not something as specific as this. Especially with subjective moods and stuff. By keeping in the same general key you won't have something stupidly dissonant occurring like

e| 0
B| 4

unless you want that.


Basically you want to write music, this is where you have to practice A LOT of different chords to the point that you intuitively know all their sounds, or what happens when you change a small pitch in the sound. For example in E standard tuning if I took C major and increased the note a bit, from my musical experience I can guess what it will sound like. I'm not always right but just sheer amount of experience gives me a bunch of tools to achieve what I want.
If your tool-shed of experience is empty, you're just going to be throwing darts at a dartboard until you hit the bullseye... but you may never hit that bullseye. In fact, you might get discouraged when nothing works.
#6
You can figure out what key you want to play in...


G Major/Eminor The E is VI
D Major/Bminor E is the II
CMaj/Aminor E is the III

Also try out harmonic minor keys as well.

That is 3 keys that include an E minor chord. So you can figure out the chords in those keys and use chords from one of the keys until you find something you are happy with.

That's all I can really say to attempt to answer your question other than learn at least a little theory not necessarily advanced berklee level but just a little bit.
Last edited by BrokenSymphony at May 13, 2011,
#7
Quote by BrokenSymphony
You can figure out what key you want to play in...


G Major/Eminor The E is VI
D Major/Bminor E is the II
Db Major/Bbminor E is the III

Also try out harmonic minor keys as well.

That is 3 keys that include an E minor chord. So you can figure out the chords in those keys and use chords from one of the keys until you find something you are happy with.

That's all I can really say to attempt to answer your question other than learn at least a little theory not necessarily advanced berklee level but just a little bit.


first of all, Em is not vi of E minor. it's the i. same deal with the D major/B minor thing. don't make the mistake of thinking they're the same key. second of all, E minor is not present in Db major. i assume you meant C# major, and even there, it's not present. so i don't know where you pulled that from.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#8
Quote by AeolianWolf
first of all, Em is not vi of E minor. it's the i. same deal with the D major/B minor thing. don't make the mistake of thinking they're the same key. second of all, E minor is not present in Db major. i assume you meant C# major, and even there, it's not present. so i don't know where you pulled that from.


Sorry when I was taught, I learned it a different way for relative minor to the majors so I call them the same key and don't renumber the chords... and C# my mistake on that one...

E is the i in E minor
B minor it is iv
A minor it is v
Last edited by BrokenSymphony at May 13, 2011,
#9
Quote by AlanHB
Well it's sorta relevant, and here's why.

To say a song is in the key of Em (or anything else), it means that it "resolves" or "feels at home" when you play Em. Quite often you'll find that songs will end with the chord that directly relates to it's key, which would be Em in this case.

So we have a song in Em, and you'll be interested to know that there are 7 chords which are created by the scale. For example if I were to write out the E minor scale as so;

E F# G A B C D
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

And say took the E note, and chose the 3rd and 5th notes of this scale to make a chord, I'd get E G and B. An E minor chord.

What if I take the A note? Well 2 along from that is the C note, and two more we go back to the start of the scale (they never end) and we get E. A, C and E = A minor chord.

What about the C? Well there's C, go back to the start again and there's the E, then two more and theres the G note. A C major chord.

Hey guess what? Your chords are E minor, A minor and C major! Wowzers! This is because they are all derived from the key of E minor, so sound great together within that key.

So if you wish to keep all the chords within that key, you should figure out the chords which belong to that key, and keep to those. As for things being eerie, sorry, it's completely up to you how to use them. I can make a happy, sad, angry or eerie song out of the chords given, and so can you.


dude that helps alot! thanks man!

oh and i just used eerie/meloncholy as an example, i wasnt looking for that specific sound
#11
I love how you specified a musical key, as opposed to a car key or house key.
Who dat?
#12
Quote by Anarion614
I love how you specified a musical key, as opposed to a car key or house key.


Presumably to forestall jokes.
#13
Quote by killer puppy
yea its pretty self explanatory..lets say im playin an Eminor chord, but throughout my chord progression i still want to keep that meloncholy/eerie vibe, how do i know which chords are appropriate? thats something i have a difficulty understanding..


That's not how music works. You need to understand the basics, such as scales, major and minor keys, and have exposure to these ideas for a while before you start trying to do these things. Otherwise you'll be flying blind. Use your ear if you are looking for a shortcut, because there is no musical theory shorthand that would make any sense to you.

I would suggest experimenting with the sounds of chords, and start noting your impressions of them, for example Maj7, Min7, Aug, etc, and start determining what they mean to you, sound wise.

Best,

Sean
#14
Quote by Sean0913
start determining what they mean to you, sound wise.


This.

If you want to write music, one of the best things you can do is know how something is going to sound.

If you hear something in your head you need to be able to know what chord/melodic intervals etc it is and realize it on your instrument/ manuscript.

Just now in the kitchen I was humming a tune and was instantly thinking "That's a 6:5 followed by a 4:3 suspension.

Like Sean said, Start by learning chords and paying attention to what they sound like/what they make you feel. when you listen to music, try and think to yourself "what chords are in this song".
#15
Quote by killer puppy
yea its pretty self explanatory..lets say im playin an Eminor chord, but throughout my chord progression i still want to keep that meloncholy/eerie vibe, how do i know which chords are appropriate? thats something i have a difficulty understanding..



Are you asking how to work out the chords in the E minor scale?

Here's the E natural minor scale.

E F# G A B C D

To find the notes for the first chord, get the root note.

The root note of the first chord is E

Get the third.

The third is G

Get the fifth.

The fifth is B

The notes in the first chord are E G B

Another example.

To find the chord that has G as the root note, get G.
Then get the note after the next [the third], which is B.
Then get the note that that is the fifth, which is D.

G B D
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