#1
http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=21630
In today's market many independent musicians view the big record labels as a parasitic entity of sorts, exploiting talented musicians, inflating undertalented pop stars and lavishly spending, while crying over "dropping" profits. Of course, not everyone feels that way, but a recent settlement between major label copyright watchdog group the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and filesharing service LimeWire does little to convince observers otherwise.

You may recall that LimeWire was smote down by the RIAA in federal court over copyright infringement claims. The site's appeals fell on deaf ears, and the service was ordered shut down.

The case has finally been wrapped up with a jury deciding on damages against the service. The jury in this case opted to arrange a settlement between LimeWire and the RIAA legal team, which would call for LimeWire to pay $10,808 USD per track for the 9,715 tracks the RIAA claimed LimeWire infringed, for a total fine of $105M USD.

While that may sound like a lot, it's actually significantly less than the maximum fine of $150,000 USD per track the jury could have awarded for willful infringement. That would have resulted in a fine of $1.46B USD. The RIAA originally sought $150B USD in damages from LimeWire -- approximately15 times the music industry's total reported yearly income -- but was deterred by the minor triviality that LimeWire had nowhere near this amount of money.

RIAA Chairman Mitch Bainwol hailed the decision, commenting, "The resolution of this case is another milestone in the continuing evolution of online music to a legitimate marketplace that appropriately rewards creators."

The settlement will do little to improve the major labels' image, though, as they're not giving any of the record windfall to the artists that actually had their work infringed.

Instead, the organization promised to spend the money to reinvigorate its unprofitable campaign of threats and lawsuits, in addition lobbying politicians to offer greater enforcement of copyright infringement at their constituents' tax expense and outlaw consumer practices like creating backup copies (which the RIAA contends is "stealing").

RIAA spokesman Jonathan Lamy states, "Any funds recouped are re-invested into our ongoing education and anti-piracy programs."

The RIAA would surely argue that artists would eventually benefit by reducing piracy. However, the organization's past efforts have proved only marginally effective at best as piracy rates have waned and waxed with the years passing years, always remaining relatively high.

Recent studies have also shown that pirates are the biggest legal purchasers of music. This makes sense, as many view piracy as a "preview" of sorts, which they use to decide which artists are worth supporting. They might not buy that Lil Wayne track they downloaded, but they might end up buying an album from a smaller artist they discovered, like The Antlers.

At the same time major labels in the U.S. and Britain are accused of committing mass infringement and stealing millions in revenue from independent musicians. The labels have convinced politicians and the legal system to give them the right to sell any track that they "can't find" licensing information for.

In effect this means they can go out and steal copyrighted work of small independent labels and musicians. A compensation system is in place, but it's notoriously bad -- many musicians have struggled for years to get repaid, only to find their pleas fall on deaf ears.

At the end of the day the major labels' campaign of infringement and campaign against infringers in the public have a surprising amount in common. Both generate big money for the labels -- and both give nothing to artists.


The music industry is disgusting, honestly. The major labels were never really honest, per se, but at least at one point they weren't such scumbags about everything. I honestly don't see how filesharing is any different from making a CD or a tape for someone.
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#2
Once again, the RIAA waves its massive **** around and doesn't help the people its waving it for
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#3
See my John Lennon quote.
Isn't it a pity?
Now, isn't it a shame?
How we break each other's hearts,
And cause each other pain...


"Music is everybody's possession. It's only publishers who think that people own it." - John Lennon
#6
They should make Limewire pay 10K/virus shared.
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#7
I think the record industry is scared. With improving technology and the internet, it's becoming easier and easier for artists to record and distribute their music all on their own, so record labels are becoming more and more unnecessary.
I'm rgrockr and I do not approve of this message.
#9
Quote by AzureNight
There's nothing wrong with that. Corporations are the lifeblood of humanity.

lolwut

I could see it if you said capitalism, but humanity?
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


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#11
Quote by ChucklesMginty
That's nice, but if the artists have no money they can't tour or record.

you got it backwards, the artists make the VAST majority of their money from tours, concerts, etc. The record companies are the only ones losing money due to file sharing.
#12
Quote by ChucklesMginty
That's nice, but if the artists have no money they can't tour or record.

Isn't it a relatively new thing for people to be getting paid for their recorded music? I'm pretty sure people were touring without record-pay (just made that term up) until like a 100 years ago or something. I just always remember that somebody posted that on here like a year ago.
Then again, I'm not too sure about how much money musicians made back then.
#13
Pirating needs to stop, but this is just wrong that none of it goes to the artists. There's also no way that the RIAA is gonna get all that money from Limewire, and it's definitely bullshit that none of the money is even going towards the music at all! It's just going around in a circle so that the RIAA can sue more people!
NOW PART OF THE

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#15
Quote by stratdud39
Isn't it a relatively new thing for people to be getting paid for their recorded music? I'm pretty sure people were touring without record-pay (just made that term up) until like a 100 years ago or something. I just always remember that somebody posted that on here like a year ago.
Then again, I'm not too sure about how much money musicians made back then.

What the hell does that have to do with anything? The Internet is new too.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#17
Quote by rockingamer2
What the hell does that have to do with anything? The Internet is new too.

It has to do with everything.
o_O
Quote by ChucklesMginty
Musicians didn't exactly tour the world on the scale we do it now.

I've been sitting here for like 15 minutes trying to come up with an answer to this. I give up.
#18
Funny how the music "thieves" are the people who are most likely to by music as well. I have my bands who I support and if I find a band who's really small or just starting out, I always buy their stuff on iTunes so money isn't wasted on the material for the CD and such. If I can go to a show, I will and I try to buy a shirt or something if I can.

The RIAA can ****ing burn.
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#19
Quote by oneblackened
I honestly don't see how filesharing is any different from making a CD or a tape for someone.


Oh, for fuck's... seriously? One is private. You share it with your mate. It stays in the family. One is effectively public. You stick it on a website which any Tom, Dick or Harry can use to steal music.
#20
Quote by Cloaca
Oh, for fuck's... seriously? One is private. You share it with your mate. It stays in the family. One is effectively public. You stick it on a website which any Tom, Dick or Harry can use to steal music.

It's the same concept. One person is buying the music, then letting someone else have it for free. Same thing, legally.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#21
Quote by housemd
you got it backwards, the artists make the VAST majority of their money from tours, concerts, etc. The record companies are the only ones losing money due to file sharing.

So therefore writing music isn't profitable.
#22
^^And that has what to do with you being unable to conceptually tell the two things apart? Srsly, do you not see the massive and blatant difference in scope?

The legal argument also doesn't really matter given that private copy is legal in several places throughout the world, y'know. Doesn't cover public filesharing.
Last edited by Cloaca at May 13, 2011,
#23
Quote by captaincrunk
So therefore writing music isn't profitable.


Honestly, how much thought did you put into that post?

Writing and distributing music brings in the crowds for the tours and concerts.
#24
Quote by captaincrunk
So therefore writing music isn't profitable.

-_^
it's extremely profitable, what gave you the idea it wasn't??
#25
Quote by housemd
-_^
it's extremely profitable, what gave you the idea it wasn't??

Reality.
#26
Disgusting. They're complaining about losing money from file sharing, but when they get a shitload of compensation, they don't even use the money for what they're saying they need it for. One of the reasons I don't buy music is because of the RIAA. If you want to showcase some of the biggest scumbags in the worlds, contact them.

Besides, I don't think this should turn into a debate on whether or not you should illegally download music, because it really doesn't matter at this point. File sharing is so wide-spread that it's impossible to stop without the RIAA turning into Big Brother. They're not going to be able to stop pirating, besides, even if they do shut down all the pirating websites somehow, money isn't going to start rolling in all of a sudden.


Pic related.

#27
Quote by rgrockr
I think the record industry is scared. With improving technology and the internet, it's becoming easier and easier for artists to record and distribute their music all on their own, so record labels are becoming more and more unnecessary.

I don't like how nobody has addressed this. I think this is a big part of it. With stuff like Soundcloud music can just happen and be everywhere. I don't know if you can sell on there though.

I very much hope the music industry turns out while I am young enough to appreciate it.