#1
e
B 3
G 0
D 4
A 5
E

This chord is used in Rise Against's "Swing Life Away" and in a little song I came up with. Anyone know the name for it?
#3
Dadd11
Quote by bass94
If you do:

e
B 3
G 2
D 4
A 5
E

the cord would be a D add9

That would just be D.
#5
its used in a third eye blind song also. it sounds nice with a C, but idk what it's called.
#6
Quote by blue_strat
Dadd11


I'd be apt to call it Dadd11(no 5) cause I like o be as accurate as humanly possibly, but you can technically omit the fifth without changing the name.

Also, you're very, very, very, VERY rarely not going to hit that open high e

-0
-3
-0
-4
-5
-

As the chord really needs that ninth to not sound congested (and since 95% of the time in modern music, you're strumming a C immediately before, so you're not going to refine your motion for this chord).


or, you could us this voicing:

-5
-3
-0
-4
-5
-

ro replenish the tone of the fifith, which immediately fills the chord back up.


As the chord really needs that ninth to not sound congested (and since 95% of the time in modern music, you're strumming a C immediately before, so you're not going to refine your motion for this chord).

(this could also be a G5Maj7/D, it's highly inlikely you're using it in that sense.)
2006 AND 2007 Ultimate Guitar Best Vocalist

Quote by Magero
Jack - 3:54 AM
I will smoke, and eat and watch Futurama in your honour
Last edited by Spynal at May 14, 2011,
#7
Quote by Spynal
Also, you're very, very, very, VERY rarely not going to hit that open high e

Easy. Mute the top string with your index finger.
Quote by Spynal
As the chord really needs that ninth to not sound congested

You need to add a note to stop it sounding congested?
Quote by Spynal
to replenish the tone of the fifith, which immediately fills the chord back up.

Or add a different one to fill it up?

Adding an E can make it sound more ambiguous - it could then be Em9/D.

In the context of a band you might want the guitar playing a simpler chord so it leaves room for other instruments.
#8
Quote by blue_strat
Easy. Mute the top string with your index finger.


Not saying it's not possible, just in most contexts OP is going to use this chord (which is immediately following a C) he's going to be playing that e. I know how to not play it, I'm just saying it tends to be there

You need to add a note to stop it sounding congested?/quote]

That voicing sounds cramped, having that high e helps it a bit.

Or add a different one to fill it up?


I don't get what you're getting at. It's the fifth, it's a fundamental tone of the chord? I don't see your apprehension heree.

Adding an E can make it sound more ambiguous - it could then be Em9/D.

In some contexts yes, but again, in most cases for the OP, we're coming off a C, so having the pedalled E is natural to the ear to tie the chords together with.

In the context of a band you might want the guitar playing a simpler chord so it leaves room for other instruments.


Trust me, I understand all of this. I've been playing a good long while, and went to college for composition. We're not talking about a band context here, OP specifically cited a song for acoustic/voice from a post-hardcore band. I'm talking strictly in that context.
2006 AND 2007 Ultimate Guitar Best Vocalist

Quote by Magero
Jack - 3:54 AM
I will smoke, and eat and watch Futurama in your honour
#9
Pretty sure that chord does not exist in that song. They do play a Dsus4, but no C-shape D (that is, a D chord mimicking the traditional Cmaj shape). Just my two cents.
Quote by SonOfPest
Its the Lydian mode; formed in Eastern Arabia when the Persians invaded England.


Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
try the sexolydian scale.