#1
Hello,
I've been playing guitar for sometime however, for quite awhile now I seem to be stuck in terms of how to progress and develop.

I'm comfortable with playing rhythm, some fingerpicking and also been learning scales for solos. I'm not in a band and my aim is to be able to play a song and mix both chords and lead playing. Just playing a simple chord structure is rather uninteresting and I wish to be able to develop to be able to take a piece of music and embelish it with a mixture of things to make it sound more interested.

Any advice or suggestions would be very much appreciated.

Thanks in Advance

David
#2
I know completely what youre talking about!!!

I play a pretty blues/rock style a la Jimi or John Mayer and love to take their phrasing (now mine) and throw them around different songs; for instance Something by George Harrison. That in a more blues via hendrix is a completely different sonic experience.

Also something to learn: Chords in every inversion and position on the neck you can find..you can play a C in 3 different voicings? Well i can do it in 6 and it adds to what I can do.

Not saying you wanna sound like any body but yourself, you didnt say, but reflect on what ive said. Maybe it'll strike a chord (PUN INTENDED)
#4
^
I appreciate you're trying to help, but your videos aren't relevant here because they're have no instructional content, it's just you playing. You're still very much a student and although you seem to be learning fast you're not quite in a position to be be teaching others yet.

TS - learn theory, specifically chord construction is what you're looking for, but to understand that you'll need to know the notes on your fretboard, understand intervals and learn how to construct and harmonise the major scale.

The thing to remember is that chords and scales are the same thing, just arranged differently. When you understand that all you're doing is building different things with the same raw materials it makes a lot more sense.

It's worth having a watch through these videos.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTUXKWnHH-g
Actually called Mark!

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#5
Learning modes really helped my improvisation--that and using them to noodle over whatever was playing on the radio or tv.
#6
Quote by steven seagull
^
I appreciate you're trying to help, but your videos aren't relevant here because they're have no instructional content, it's just you playing. You're still very much a student and although you seem to be learning fast you're not quite in a position to be be teaching others yet.

TS - learn theory, specifically chord construction is what you're looking for, but to understand that you'll need to know the notes on your fretboard, understand intervals and learn how to construct and harmonise the major scale.

The thing to remember is that chords and scales are the same thing, just arranged differently. When you understand that all you're doing is building different things with the same raw materials it makes a lot more sense.

It's worth having a watch through these videos.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTUXKWnHH-g

I forgot to mention this.
http://www.jamtrackcentral.com/guitar_heroes.php
This is a link to the site where I learned the lead fills in the Van Halen section.
It's pretty usefull info there it also has a later Jimi Hendrix style.
#8
Quote by mythilogical
Hello,
I've been playing guitar for sometime however, for quite awhile now I seem to be stuck in terms of how to progress and develop.

I'm comfortable with playing rhythm, some fingerpicking and also been learning scales for solos. I'm not in a band and my aim is to be able to play a song and mix both chords and lead playing. Just playing a simple chord structure is rather uninteresting and I wish to be able to develop to be able to take a piece of music and embelish it with a mixture of things to make it sound more interested.

Any advice or suggestions would be very much appreciated.

Thanks in Advance

David


Hi David,

If you want to do solos, you're going to need to put a ton of time into practicing. Most people I know spend 3 years practicing scales on the higher neck before they finally get comfortable. Your technique needs to be FLAWLESS and TENSIONLESS or you're not going to be able to solo unless all you do is noodle on really slow stuff. Even then, bad technique will mess you up live; at least I can tell you that from experience back when I sucked.
You need to set aside 6-8 hours a day and go over all the different kinds of soloing types you want. When you get a bit bored, just come on here or go over to a friends house.

It's like working out your muscles. At first when you can only bench 50-60 pounds you feel weak and all, but when you start getting upwards of 150 lbs+ and your muscles start actually getting tone, it feels awesome.
Likewise, when you practice hardcore and get solid results when you play perfectly (perfect practice = perfect technique), you'll shine... but it takes time. Just set aside 6-8 hours and you'll be good. At minimum. Any less time and you won't proceed anywhere fast at all. Good luck
#9
6-8 hours a day?
so it's basically hopeless for someone with a real job and a real life to be playing good solos then?
#10
Quote by timelessx
6-8 hours a day?
so it's basically hopeless for someone with a real job and a real life to be playing good solos then?


Lets say you go to work at 8 am, come back after a 9 hour work day at 4-5 pm, 6 hours takes you to 10-11, which leaves you with 1-3 hours to do whatever you want (eating in between and all).
If you have a girlfriend (which I fall into that class), sometimes you just have to cut it back to 4-5 hours a day and spend the rest with her. Somedays if you're having so much fun together you just make it 1-2 hours and then just do 10-12 hours on the weekend.

If you're REALLY serious, you can still maintain a job. If you have higher priorities in life then you can't complain because only the person decide how good they get on guitar is the person themselves.

I managed to do the above while doing a university degree (in physics) AND having a girlfriend at the same time. So, there's honestly no excuse for someone who has a job to say they can't play 6+ hours a day.
The key is, if you really and truly love it, you can get it done.

If you want to be doing the good solos 10-15 years down the road, that's okay as well. It's no rush... just most people end up getting discouraged and quitting. Lets be honest, NO ONE on this board will have time to do 6 hours a day once they have a kid and a house to take care of. Get it done now before it's too late.
Last edited by ElitiusMaxim at May 16, 2011,
#11
Nobody has to play 6 hours a day, or even 1.

Likewise not everyone wants to be shredder - just because that may be your chosen path on the instrument it's not everyones, nor is it the be-all and end-all of guitar playing. The threadstarter just wants some tips on learning to solo, you're being way over the top...it doesn't take "10-15" years to learn how to play a good solo even with minimal practice. A "good" solo is one that tells a story, uses tasteful, appropriate phrasing, has melody and also takes the underlying harmony into account - doesn't matter about the inherent technical difficulty of it as long as the player has the ability to play what HE wants to play competently.

Yes I know some people can devote most of their free time to the guitar, they'll usually end up shit-hot and I respect them for that - but the reality is very few guitar players have either the inclination or the resources to devote to that intensity of practice.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#12
I really wouldn't reccomend spending that long playing, after more than a few hours, I really can't believe the brain can still process correct practice.

What matters most, I would say regardless of daily practice time, is that you spend each and every minute analysing and brutally correcting your technique. Once you know exactly HOW to proceed, every single step counts, there's no point in making it become a chore.

What I think, however, matters more importantly than that, is that you set aside time to achieve fun goals in yourself. If you lose your drive to play music, then the whole point of practice becomes moot anyways.

Edit: Keep getting ninja'd today.

If I remember correctly, Tosin Abasi never truly bogged himself down in strict practice routines or binges, and he is no slouch.
Last edited by GrStMyGn at May 16, 2011,
#13
Lol now were talking about practicing really long after school I mostly practice 3 hours almost every single day after school and in the weekend about 8 hours or so.
And I never became a technique kind of guy.
Never been able to play fast and I think it'll come naturally to me.
#14
You can certainly get a lot accomplished in less time if you practice effectively.

As far as learning how to piece chords and single note lines together learning triad shapes all over the fretboard would help. Then practice along to a drum loop or metronome to keep time. You can start with a simple two chord vamp and just work on filling in the gaps on beats 3 and 4 or you can mix it up however you feel it. Also end your phrases on a chord tone and that should keep you in the pocket of the harmony. If your playing on an A minor chord then end your phrase on either an A, C, E even G. You can try other notes and see how that works.

Obviously Modes and chord scale relationships are important and how to get around that is key to developing a good solo.

I have some downloadable lessons at my site at: http://www.joepinnavaia.weebly.com which may help.

Steven Seagull hits the other points right on the head. You want to be able to build and tell a story.

All the best