#1
Hey all.
So I've got this theory book.
And this makes sight reading pretty fun actually.
But now to come to the question: Will theory make me a better songwriter?
Also I'm having trouble drawing quarter note rest does anybody have a link to a guide?
#4
To a certain extent it will. Theory might sometimes give you a fresh idea that you wouldn't have come up with on your own, but then again I think you shouldn't write a song from a purely theoretically perspective. Don't forget it's music you're writing, it's meant to be listened to and theory is only an attempt to analyze what we're hearing.
#5
Does understanding grammar mean you're better equipped to write a book?

Of course it does.

Does it automatically mean you'll be better at writing books?

Of course not.
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#6
Yes and no. you have an ear for it or you don't; theory will only give definitions to unanswered questions. I am a 3rd year music ed student and have a comprehensive theoretical/historical background in theory and have no problem relating guitar to it. In fact, I like to think about chordal harmonies and relationships. BUT I'm the first to say theory is useless if you don't first have an ear for music to begin with. Do you need to know how chromatic mediants work or what a phrygian half cadence is...hell no...do you need to know the modes and scales...useful but not necessary. It all comes down to what you want to do with yourself...If you wanna strum around the campfire then don't bother...if you want to be legit then learn all you can and apply it.

As for drawing rests....no one does anything well without practice
#7
Quote by steven seagull
Does understanding grammar mean you're better equipped to write a book?

Of course it does.

Most epic analogy (If that's the word).
I've got my answers except for the quarter note rests.
I mostly just write a double w and then fill the space in.
#8
To get the quarter note rest, print off some staff paper and start practicing.
Remember, it doesn't have to look like the fancy ones in the book. As long as it's easily identifiable as a quarter rest, you should be good.

Theory will help with songwriting.
..I was watching my death.
#9
Quote by jrenkert
Yes and no. you have an ear for it or you don't; theory will only give definitions to unanswered questions. I am a 3rd year music ed student and have a comprehensive theoretical/historical background in theory and have no problem relating guitar to it. In fact, I like to think about chordal harmonies and relationships. BUT I'm the first to say theory is useless if you don't first have an ear for music to begin with. Do you need to know how chromatic mediants work or what a phrygian half cadence is...hell no...do you need to know the modes and scales...useful but not necessary. It all comes down to what you want to do with yourself...If you wanna strum around the campfire then don't bother...if you want to be legit then learn all you can and apply it.

As for drawing rests....no one does anything well without practice

I am practicing it the book doesn't really give a tutorial.
It just says it's like a w blabla.
#10
Quote by timbit2006
To get the quarter note rest, print off some staff paper and start practicing.
Remember, it doesn't have to look like the fancy ones in the book. As long as it's easily identifiable as a quarter rest, you should be good.

Theory will help with songwriting.

Is there anything else that looks like a wobbly shape?
I think then I have it under control.
#12
Quote by Equivalence
Try writing a z tilted on its side with a c attached to the lower end. Worked perfectly for me

A z on it's side is an N right?
#16
In terms of writing the symbols, just practice on it.

Like when you're a kid and you do handwriting lessons in school to get your writing to look better, it's like that but with music.

In terms of the question posed in the thread title, yes, theory helps your writing a great deal.
I mean, you can't write a great song by knowing just theory, but theory does help a lot.
#17
Quote by Punk_Ninja
In terms of writing the symbols, just practice on it.

Like when you're a kid and you do handwriting lessons in school to get your writing to look better, it's like that but with music.

In terms of the question posed in the thread title, yes, theory helps your writing a great deal.
I mean, you can't write a great song by knowing just theory, but theory does help a lot.
Lol those handwriting lessons never helped...
But anyways one symbol will probably work.
#18
I'm not sure if someone mentioned this or not. I didn't want to read through every single response, so I apologize if it's a repeat.

My opinion is that it won't improve your ABILITY to write, but I think it will just make you aware of what your options are as a composer. In other words, it's basically expanding your arsenal.

For example, if you never knew what a double harmonic major scale looks like, you'd never write a melody using it. You can't use what you don't know.
Danny L. Small
Guitarist/Teacher/Composer




#19
It'll make it easier to become a better writer.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


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#20
Yes and no...writing does have to come from yourself. Now when you're stuck or you find that a certain passage doesn't flow the way you want it to, theory can help with that a lot. Personally, harmonizing a single line that I come up with is usually what I use my theory for. Theory can also spice up your music so everything isn't always diatonic and repetitive. Ya know? Like add some chromaticism, maybe some secondary dominants eh?