#1
Hey guys.

I'm a Noob when it comes to recording.
I'm doing some recording in my bathroom with my acoustic guitar.
I've got it mic'd with a RODE M3 which as a 80Hz cut (High-Pass Filter) setting and I was wondering if it would be of any use?

Thanks
#2
Never record any guitar with high filter...
That being said, never record anything in a bathroom.
Both for the same reason, you will not be able to get rid of tonal cut and natural verb that will occur. However, you could add these later...
Always keep a recording as simple and as dead as possible then add affects later (=
#4
Quote by hawk_kst
Never record any guitar with high filter...
That being said, never record anything in a bathroom.
Both for the same reason, you will not be able to get rid of tonal cut and natural verb that will occur. However, you could add these later...
Always keep a recording as simple and as dead as possible then add affects later (=

Are you serious?

1) Why not? Who actually uses any information from guitars much below 100Hz, apart from on tracks where it's only vocals and an acoustic guitar? For all rock mixes I have a HPF on the guitar at at least 85Hz, often much higher... admittedly I don't do this while tracking as I don't tend to record guitar with mics that feature a HPF, but if I could I probably would... saves using up tracking headroom with unnecessary frequencies.

Basically there's a time and a place for HPF's, so never rule it out if it might sort out a problem (i.e boomy low end)


2) Never record in a bathroom? If you're after a snappy reverb with plenty of reflections and high end, why the hell not record in a bathroom? I've seen/heard plenty of people track a particular tone in a bathroom, as the tiles are highly reflective and the typically small size of the room gives a very short pre-delay. Can work nicely on vocals, and on rockabilly/surf-style slapback-delayed guitar.


As for your rule at the end... yeah that's a good rule to follow, but keep in mind that you don't always have to follow rules - breaking them is where most people find their creativity.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#5
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Are you serious?

1) Why not? Who actually uses any information from guitars much below 100Hz, apart from on tracks where it's only vocals and an acoustic guitar? For all rock mixes I have a HPF on the guitar at at least 85Hz, often much higher... admittedly I don't do this while tracking as I don't tend to record guitar with mics that feature a HPF, but if I could I probably would... saves using up tracking headroom with unnecessary frequencies.

Basically there's a time and a place for HPF's, so never rule it out if it might sort out a problem (i.e boomy low end)


2) Never record in a bathroom? If you're after a snappy reverb with plenty of reflections and high end, why the hell not record in a bathroom? I've seen/heard plenty of people track a particular tone in a bathroom, as the tiles are highly reflective and the typically small size of the room gives a very short pre-delay. Can work nicely on vocals, and on rockabilly/surf-style slapback-delayed guitar.


This.

Quote by hawk_kst

Always keep a recording as simple and as dead as possible then add affects later (=


Not this.

Live rooms are almost never dead. A good sounding room is rarely a dead room. Take a look at any well built professional studio. They'll have it heavily treated, but there will be plenty of strategically placed reflective surfaces, and they often have wall panels or gobos that can be turned around to be either more reflective or more absorptive. Anyone who knows what they're talking about with home studios will recommend not completely deadening a room. The trick is to target specific problem frequencies, but leave the rest alone. Even with adding reverb later, some good natural reverb helps pretty much every recording. You dont want to start a mix with completely lifeless tracks. It just wont sound the same when it's finished.
#6
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Are you serious?

1) Why not? Who actually uses any information from guitars much below 100Hz, apart from on tracks where it's only vocals and an acoustic guitar? For all rock mixes I have a HPF on the guitar at at least 85Hz, often much higher... admittedly I don't do this while tracking as I don't tend to record guitar with mics that feature a HPF, but if I could I probably would... saves using up tracking headroom with unnecessary frequencies.

Basically there's a time and a place for HPF's, so never rule it out if it might sort out a problem (i.e boomy low end)


2) Never record in a bathroom? If you're after a snappy reverb with plenty of reflections and high end, why the hell not record in a bathroom? I've seen/heard plenty of people track a particular tone in a bathroom, as the tiles are highly reflective and the typically small size of the room gives a very short pre-delay. Can work nicely on vocals, and on rockabilly/surf-style slapback-delayed guitar.


As for your rule at the end... yeah that's a good rule to follow, but keep in mind that you don't always have to follow rules - breaking them is where most people find their creativity.


This....for sure....

What happened to all the good advice the use to be giving in the recording forum in the last month or 2?

To bad everyone scared Technicolor Type away cause at least she could help straighten up the good advice from the bad...
#8
Quote by hawk_kst
Always keep a recording as simple and as dead as possible then add affects later (=


Tell that to Zeppelin on When The Levee Breaks. If I find a sound I want, I go to where its at and record it. I mean, thats half the reason I've done some recording in the raquetball court at my parents, leads to some interesting verb.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#10
Quote by hawk_kst

Always keep a recording as simple and as dead as possible then add affects later (=


Cause all those huge, famous live rooms are just for looks