#1
So, I have a Marshall Vintage Modern 2266 half stack.

On the head there are two speak cable sockets and a switch that selects the output. It changes between 8 ohms and 16 ohms. (Below). I have always had the switch on the 16 ohm setting.



Now on the cab, there's another two speaker cable sockets. The one on the left says above it "4 Ω" and below it, says "8 Ω Right". The right one says above it "16 Ω" and below it says "8 Ω Left". There is a switch between the cables that selects between mono and stereo.



Now, I've had this amp for a while but never paid much attention to the back. I set it up how I was told to in the instructions. I want to know what the rest of these sockets and switches do and how it affects the sound if at all. Thanks.

EDIT: Since having it, I've had a speaker cable going from the left socket on the head to the right socket on the cab. The switch on the cab has always been on mono and the one on the head has always been on the 16 ohm setting
Last edited by WholeLottaIzzy at May 14, 2011,
#2
the ohm switch is for diff cab loads if you have 1 16 ohm cab then put switch in 16 ohm and use 1 lead. if you have 1 8ohm cab then put it on 8ohm selection and connect 1 lead. if you have 2 16 om cabs put the switch on 8 oms and use both leads. However in stereo mode 2x 50watts would tech be the same aplication put it on 16 ohms and you need 2 16 ohm cabs for each jack lead. same with the 8 ohm selection. I don't think you'll find too dramatic of a diff in tone honestly.
#3
I think the 4 and 16 ohms above the jacks indicate the ohm rating for the mono setting. It generally doesn't make alot of difference for the sound, just whether it's stereo or not.

If you want to use mono on this cab, you have to stick a single cable in a socket on the head, and stick it in the right one on the cab. The left one being 4 ohm's in mono is so you can put a different head on the same cab if it runs through 4 ohms.
#4
So when would I want to switch between stereo and mono on the can? And when would I want to switch the ohms on the head between 8 and 16? I'm obviously not too clued up on half stacks and such.
#5
You always want to match the impedance of your head and cab when you can. If you're using the 16ohm jack on the right, then leave the head selected at 16ohms. If you got another 16ohm cab, then you'd switch the head to 8ohms and it would be driving both 16ohm cabs (which would be an 8ohm load when run that way).

Basically if you never use stereo, or add more cabs you'll never switch the head out of 16 ohms.

I'm not really too informed on stereo, and I don't really see why running half the speakers in the same cab in stereo would really sound any better, so I can't help you there. But basically, if you switch the cab to stereo, then each input will be 8 ohms, so you'd want to switch the outputs on the head to 8 ohms as well, and use 2 separate cables to connect to the two stereo jacks on the cab. Leaving it set at 16 could damage your amp if the cab is only taking 8.

Also, for running the cab in mono (where it's set in that pic), you'll only want to use one speaker cable. Using two could damage the amp / cab (see the little warning about switching to mono with stereo inputs below the switch)
Quote by tubetime86
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You finally made it home, draped in the flag that you fell for.
And so it goes
Last edited by jpatan at May 14, 2011,
#6
Quote by jpatan
You always want to match the impedance of your head and cab when you can. If you're using the 16ohm jack on the right, then leave the head selected at 16ohms. If you got another 16ohm cab, then you'd switch the head to 8ohms and it would be driving both 16ohm cabs (which would be an 8ohm load when run that way).

Basically if you never use stereo, or add more cabs you'll never switch the head out of 16 ohms.

I'm not really too informed on stereo, and I don't really see why running half the speakers in the same cab in stereo would really sound any better, so I can't help you there. But basically, if you switch the cab to stereo, then each input will be 8 ohms, so you'd want to switch the outputs on the head to 8 ohms as well, and use 2 separate cables to connect to the two stereo jacks on the cab. Leaving it set at 16 could damage your amp if the cab is only taking 8.

Also, for running the cab in mono (where it's set in that pic), you'll only want to use one speaker cable. Using two could damage the amp / cab (see the little warning about switching to mono with stereo inputs below the switch)

Thanks, that's cleared things up. So, using mono, keep it on the 16 ohm setting, yeah? I wasn't using both cables, just the one, I just plugged another in so I know where it was (I have a mess of cables just below the pic )

Ok thanks!
#7
Yep, just leave it on 16 and make sure you're plugging it into the 16 ohm jack on the cab.
Quote by tubetime86
He's obviously pretty young, and I'd guess he's being raised by wolves, or at least humans with the intellectual capacity and compassion of wolves.


You finally made it home, draped in the flag that you fell for.
And so it goes
#8
You're doing it right.

The reason for the stereo cab is so you can run two heads into it. I do this all the time.

You shouldn't plug a cable into the 2nd speaker jack unless it is going somewhere. Too easy for the other end to short to ground on another piece of equipment if it's just hanging around.
Bruce Clement
BC Audio Hand Crafted Performance