#1
Yo,

My Gibson SG's top string buzzes. The buzzing isn't minor, its pretty noticeable. The story behind it is, my neck pickup broke, so I shipped off to Chicago, where they replaced it. They then added new strings, and the top string now buzzes. Does anybody know what to do, cuz I would really appreciate help. I have an audition tomorrow, and I'd prefer to play my SG instead of my Squier Tele.

Thanks,
JediRabbit
#2
is it on any fret or only when open?
changing a pickup is seriously easy, you should do it yourself.

anyway if its only when open you may have a worn nut. if its any fret, if your actions low and the new strings are higher guage they might buzz, in which case just raise the bridge a tiny amount and try it, repeat until it stops.

also check your truss rod, i do this by holding the guitar up to my face so the neck points away, and look up the neck to see if its straight. if it dips in the middle tighten truss rod a quarter turn at a time and look again. if it rises in the middle then loosen.
use google to find more detailed help for that.

otherwise all i can say it take a really close look from the tuner to the saddle on the the string and see if you can find the problem. pick the string and look closely at where it vibrates over the frets to try to figure out where its coming from or maybe youll see what its touching.
Last edited by SigSog at May 14, 2011,
#4
it may need a little bit of a set-up. shipping guitars around, especially to different climate regions, can mess with the set-up. refer to the sticky at the top of this forum, it does not lie!
#5
Quote by SigSog

changing a pickup is seriously easy, you should do it yourself.


I'm new at this, and I wasn't exactly sure what was wrong, so I decided to let the pros handle it.

Thanks for the advice guys. I'll get right on this!! (I mean that positively.)
#6
When light strings are in normal tuning they pull about 200 lbs. That load is counteracted by truss rod tension. After time the neck takes a "set" because this continuous, balanced load settles in with the friction and mechanical play of the truss rod. When you take off all the strings at once it will undo this set. Putting a new set of strings on and tightening them does not guarantee that the neck will return to this "set" position.

You'll need to make a truss rod adjustment to get it back to where it was before. If you're not certain of how to do this properly it's probably best to have someone do it for you.

Avoid taking all the strings off at once if possible. Often you can do this with no drawbacks but if you remove all the string tension there is at least some chance of needing a truss adjustment afterwards.
I read Emerson on the can. A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds...true...but a consistent reading of Emerson has its uses nevertheless.
#7
Quote by Zlurgh
When light strings are in normal tuning they pull about 200 lbs. That load is counteracted by truss rod tension. After time the neck takes a "set" because this continuous, balanced load settles in with the friction and mechanical play of the truss rod. When you take off all the strings at once it will undo this set. Putting a new set of strings on and tightening them does not guarantee that the neck will return to this "set" position.

You'll need to make a truss rod adjustment to get it back to where it was before. If you're not certain of how to do this properly it's probably best to have someone do it for you.

Avoid taking all the strings off at once if possible. Often you can do this with no drawbacks but if you remove all the string tension there is at least some chance of needing a truss adjustment afterwards.


Ahhhhhh no.
#8
no what?
I read Emerson on the can. A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds...true...but a consistent reading of Emerson has its uses nevertheless.