#1
I feel like I've been beating my head against a wall for months now trying to figure out how to bring up my bpm with licks, etc. I asked questions and was always told the same thing, start really slow, and then up the bpm a bit and repeat. Problem was I'd generally get to around 110bpm and hit a wall.

But yesterday a buddy of mine came by who can move pretty fast (and clean) on the fretboard and I asked him how he got fast. He said he tried the same thing with the metronome and couldn't get anywhere. Finally he just put the metronome away and would play the lick over and over, usually while doing something else like watching TV, til it became second nature and then the speed just took off.

So last night I tried it and what a huge difference. I was stuck at 70% of tempo and got it to 100% today. And all I did was watch some Knight Rider and noodle on it.

So for me, starting with a metronome while memorizing the lick initially is good, then just noodling on it while doing something else brings up the speed, and finally back to the metronome to make sure it's still in time works really well.

Just thought I'd put that out there, maybe it'll help someone else.
#2
Have to try this........Sounds interesting and one of my friends does this but i thought it was cause he was weird lol!......
#3
It all depends on how people learn.
I used to struggle with learning wicked fast solos, and I actually just learned how to play the solo to Beast and the Harlot. What I did was use Guitar Pro, and start at 40 BPM, increasing by 5 everytime that i could play the riffs through at least 5 times without a single mistake. I was finally able to play that thing at like, 75% tempo. I slept on it for a few days without playing guitar, came back to it at full tempo, and could play it. So it all depends on how you learn.
#4
Sounds to me like you just did a lot more practise. More practise = more results.

Obviously starting slow and clean and building it up is a better way to practice (whether you use the metronome or not) - but if you clock 4 times as much practise in front of the telly don't be surprised if you make more progress.

That said, practising without focus is totally useless for anything except developing strength and stamina, and speed is based on a lot more than strength and stamina.
#5
Quote by Legion6789
I feel like I've been beating my head against a wall for months now trying to figure out how to bring up my bpm with licks, etc. I asked questions and was always told the same thing, start really slow, and then up the bpm a bit and repeat. Problem was I'd generally get to around 110bpm and hit a wall.

But yesterday a buddy of mine came by who can move pretty fast (and clean) on the fretboard and I asked him how he got fast. He said he tried the same thing with the metronome and couldn't get anywhere. Finally he just put the metronome away and would play the lick over and over, usually while doing something else like watching TV, til it became second nature and then the speed just took off.

So last night I tried it and what a huge difference. I was stuck at 70% of tempo and got it to 100% today. And all I did was watch some Knight Rider and noodle on it.

So for me, starting with a metronome while memorizing the lick initially is good, then just noodling on it while doing something else brings up the speed, and finally back to the metronome to make sure it's still in time works really well.

Just thought I'd put that out there, maybe it'll help someone else.


You can only get faster if you work your muscle memory to use the least amount of tension possible with the most effective shifting between notes that is needed. It's impossible to increase speed really, it's about increasing the effectiveness of your technique so that you can-- with minimal effort-- hit the notes needed and nothing more.
#6
Quote by Freepower
Sounds to me like you just did a lot more practice. More practice = more results.

Obviously starting slow and clean and building it up is a better way to practice (whether you use the metronome or not) - but if you clock 4 times as much practice in front of the telly don't be surprised if you make more progress.

That said, practicing without focus is totally useless for anything except developing strength and stamina, and speed is based on a lot more than strength and stamina.


^ This.

I'd recommend your style of practice only after you get to the point where you can comfortably play it without making mistakes. (this isn't dependent on bpm, just as long as you have a speed you can play it at without messing up.) Because at that point it just becomes a matter of developing muscle memory with the proper technique.

This probably wouldn't do you a lick of good when practicing more advanced techniques later down the road but can be useful for the little things.