#1
I'm writing an instrumental song at the moment at 130bmp, using guitar pro to keep a record as I go.

The chorus is at the same tempo but I added a triplet 8th feel which I find gives it more of a groove. It sounds nice but in a real life band situation how hard would it be to transfer from a standard on-the-beat feel to the chorus which is a triplet feel, then back to standard again? There is no fill or anything before entering the chorus either and I would imagine the drummer having a hard time staying in time.

Is this method common or is there a "general rule" to apply for being able to keep time better in a real life situation?
#2
To be quite honest, any band worth anything should be able to do that, or at least be able to do it after a bit of practice. Switching time and feel is an integral part of tooooons of music.
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#3
I see why it sounds so hard to transfer... the bass sounds slightly out of time with the bass kick. With the standard feel it is all in time, but as soon as i make it a triplet feel the bass sounds out of time by a semi-quaver.

Would this be a Guitar Pro error or writing error?

Note: This happens when using both RSE and midi sounds so it is not an RSE error.
#4
why not post a cross section of your work and let us take a look? someone will be able to help im sure.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#5
Quote by HeadlessCross
I see why it sounds so hard to transfer... the bass sounds slightly out of time with the bass kick. With the standard feel it is all in time, but as soon as i make it a triplet feel the bass sounds out of time by a semi-quaver.

Would this be a Guitar Pro error or writing error?

I'd say both. Sounds like you're writing it in regular time and then switching to triplet feel/swing time/shuffle/whatever you want to call it. Delete those few bars and try to write them again while you're already in swing time.
As for the transition, maybe one or two rhythm-focused bars (can be a drum fill, for instance) that smoothen the change. Either that or something completely disruptive, but that's something you'll have to practice very well if you're playing it in a band and maybe it won't come out right until after 20+ times. But then you'd have the GP track, which the rest of the band could listen to to get a grasp on the time change.
#6
Why don't you move to 6/8 time?

If you are still playing 130 quarter notes per minute the tempo does not change and the drummer can kick on 1 and 4 .. playing a backbeat will NOT sound the same ... might be throwing you off .. put snare hits on triplets .. add some syncopation that you'd find in swing jazz.