#1
Hey Guys

So I'm playing and Ibanez XPT700 Xiphos through a Roland Jazz Chorus and i was wondering what kind of Treble/Mid/Bass levels would be good for a nice rounded jazz/blues tone and if there are any other effects (such as reverb/chorus) that you would suggest for jazz.

Thanks guys
#2
You don't need effects, what you need is a new amp.

j/k, i'm not a jazz expert, but if you want proper jazz tones i think you need a hollowbody guitar.
#3
Quote by Lord_Doku
You don't need effects, what you need is a new amp.



Are you insane? The Roland JC has some of the best cleans ever, if not THE best cleans ever.

OP try adding more bass and slightly easing off the treble. Also, try messing around with your tone knob a bit, a classic jazz sound has a very deep voice, but since you'll be playing clean or almost clean you won't get lost in the mix.

And you might consider checking out a compressor, they help if you're gonna be playing some funky chord riffage. A cheapish one that i like is the MXR Dynacomp, check that on out.
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Last edited by Gord@k at May 15, 2011,
#4
i presume you mean traditional jazz?

in which case, what you want is a very very rounded and transparent clean tone which the roland jazz chorus excels at. EQ is really a matter of taste, though i'd recommend high bass and quite low treble as a starting point. the same goes for FX - if you feel that a little reverb or chorus is appropriate then by all means go for it - there are no "rules" for jazz tone at all.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#5
Use the neck pickup with the bass and treble low and the midrange high. Trad Jazz used archtop guitars with only a neck pickups. Both the guitar and the pickups used were very midheavy so even though trad amps were bright the guitar/pickup combo didn't produce much other than midrange.

It also doesn't hurt to use a medium low quality lead with the volume on the guitar turned half way down. This helps to filter out some of the top end.
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#8
Everyone's mostly right on this, but I'll just reiterate and add a little of my own advice.

1. What you think sounds good is what you should use. **** everyone else, if you're not satisfied with your tone, change it. If you are, don't **** with it.
2. Mahogany has a lot more low end, so you don't need to roll down the tone knob as much. It doesn't have so much midrange, so I'd roll up the mids pretty high, probably about 7-8. Keep the treble low, I'd say at about 2-3, depending on your taste.
3. I don't know your amp that well, so ignore the previous point if it doesn't sound good on your amp.
4. Ignore anyone who says your guitar "won't work for jazz."
5. Mess around with your tone. A lot. Until you find what works for you.
6. Have fun
#9
Quote by trueamerican
1. What you think sounds good is what you should use. **** everyone else, if you're not satisfied with your tone, change it. If you are, don't **** with it.

while i agree with everything else you said, this point doesn't really extend beyond bedroom playing

if you're gigging or recording you have to accept other people's suggestions towards your tone. an audience wants to hear a band that sound good together, and you're gonna stand out for all the wrong reasons if your own "signature" tone doesn't fit the music you're playing
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.