#1
my guitar is generally tuned to standard E and i frequently drop it to D.

when im really rocking out ill drop it to C. i'm worried that the change in tension on the neck and slack on the strings is having adverse effects on my guitar/string life span.

am i worrying over nothing?
#2
Don't the strings sound a bit pants dropping stock strings to C?
It isn't exactly great for your strings.. it's more likely to snap when you tune back up. Not sure tone-wise though. Changing from E standard to D isn't a problem. I doubt it'll warp the neck any time soon if it's well built however.

If you're worrying, buy the correct strings for drop C (I don't know these though). They should keep the same tension as standard and also at the same time, feel a LOT better than floppy ones.
There's a good chance that what I've written above is useless and if you take any of the advice it's your own fault.
#3
About a year ago I played with C standard tuning and the strings were really loose and it sounded pretty awful. I then bought some thicker strings for my Les Paul and it sounded much better.
I think tuning down to Standard C with Standard Strings doesn't hurt your guitars neck but you won't get a really statisfying result.
I had .10 - .46 on my guitar for E standard and I think .12 - .52 for C standard

Sorry for my english, I'm from Germany
#4
one thing i have noticed is how extremely fast it goes out of tune when i tune down or up, not sure if this is the string type or if it is normal.

i may take both your advice and go with a heavier guage. my next investment was actually going to be the hybrids (heavy low string and light high strings) but i dont think they are suited for drop C. So 12 guage will sound alright with standard E tuning?

also, i own a Les Paul, EMG pick ups
#7
youre onto something UM

they sound a little slack, doesnt sound bad though, but like i said, the tuning goes wack after i play through one song
#8
The truss rod (metal rod that goes through the neck to keep it straight) will have been set up to keep the neck at the right angle for standard tension strings, so probably 10s tuned to standard. If you tune 10s down from E to C, then obviously the tension is massively reduced and the neck will warp a little bit.

I'd say either adjust the truss rod (or get someone who knows what they're doing to do) or buy thicker strings, they'll have more tension at a lower tuning
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#9
would you suggest adjusting the rod and switching to the tens? is it necessary?

i want to get hyrbid strings, hopefully that doesnt distort my guitar neck at all due the thiness of the higher strings
#10
Quote by MissPopo
would you suggest adjusting the rod and switching to the tens? is it necessary?

i want to get hyrbid strings, hopefully that doesnt distort my guitar neck at all due the thiness of the higher strings

when you say dropping to D or C you mean D standard/ C standard, or drop D/ drop C?

honestly don't you think its kind of a pain in the arse to be adjusting your truss rod every time you change the tuning? how long do you leave the guitar tuned that way?

I'd say thicker strings are going to be more helpful than anything else. you should save up to get another guitar and set one up for the lower tuning, and the other just for standard.

also yes constantly changing the tuning does make the string life shorter. if you can get your hands on a spring, squeeze it shut for a few minutes, then stretch it out and hold it there for a few minutes. now squeeze it again, notice how it doesn't squish the same way anymore? pull it further, and try again. every time you stretch it out, it causes the strings to be looser than it would have originally. obviously the difference in the strings will not be as noticable as it is on a spring, but it is essentially the same concept.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#11
Drop C is a bit....... well, it just sounds a bit dead in my opinion. I don't think it should do anything to the neck though. But it does weaken the string if you do it a lot.
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#12
I don't think it will have any adverse effect on the neck, I've been doing that for years without problems. But every guitar is different, so I would advice caution and thicker strings.
#13
Quote by krypticguitar87
when you say dropping to D or C you mean D standard/ C standard, or drop D/ drop C?

honestly don't you think its kind of a pain in the arse to be adjusting your truss rod every time you change the tuning? how long do you leave the guitar tuned that way?

I'd say thicker strings are going to be more helpful than anything else. you should save up to get another guitar and set one up for the lower tuning, and the other just for standard.

also yes constantly changing the tuning does make the string life shorter. if you can get your hands on a spring, squeeze it shut for a few minutes, then stretch it out and hold it there for a few minutes. now squeeze it again, notice how it doesn't squish the same way anymore? pull it further, and try again. every time you stretch it out, it causes the strings to be looser than it would have originally. obviously the difference in the strings will not be as noticable as it is on a spring, but it is essentially the same concept.



i shouldve been more clear. im in 2 bands, one being a hardcore band where i tune down to CGCFAD, and the other band i tune to standard E, and occasionally drop the E string to a D.

i jam with the hardcore band about once a week, sometimes ill tune down when i learn a new song, so that makes it about twice a week.


if i could afford another guitar, i would get one, but alas, i cant so i guess ill make do with buying Hybrid 10 gauge, even though by the sounds of it, ill have to restring it a lot more

oh and great explanation with the springs, helped me understand
#14
The thing you should probably be more concerned about is the string life, as excess tuning does make them much more prone to snapping, like what kryptic said basically

If you're gonna be going from low tunings to standard then don't worry about the truss rod as that'd obviously then have a negative effect on the standard tuning. If you end up playing more dropped stuff and experience buzzing then it's worth getting it adjusted. But seriously, don't try it yourself unless you know how it should be, cause it's very easy to get wrong and very easy to permanently damage the neck quite badly if you screw it up..
PRS SE Chris Robertson
PRS SE EG
PRS SE Angelus Custom
Yamaha SF1000 (Both of 'em)

Laney L20H Lionheart
Marshall 1936 w/ Eminence

Rather large pedalboard..
#15
For perspective I ran calculations for 3 string gauge sets, Ernie Ball Regular, Power and Beefy slinky.

Regular has 102# of tension in standard tuning, 78# dropped as your example.

Power has 118# in standard, 91# dropped

Beefy has 145# standard, 135# dropped


Based on that it seems to me your best compromise between floppy and excessive for your particular needs is the Power slinky set.

Hope that helps.
#16
Quote by MissPopo
i shouldve been more clear. im in 2 bands, one being a hardcore band where i tune down to CGCFAD, and the other band i tune to standard E, and occasionally drop the E string to a D.

i jam with the hardcore band about once a week, sometimes ill tune down when i learn a new song, so that makes it about twice a week.


if i could afford another guitar, i would get one, but alas, i cant so i guess ill make do with buying Hybrid 10 gauge, even though by the sounds of it, ill have to restring it a lot more

oh and great explanation with the springs, helped me understand

okay so its standard, drop C, and drop D....

alright just going from standard to drop D shouldn't make too much of a difference in string life. however changing to drop C on a pretty regular basis is much more wear and tear on the strings.

I would strongly recommend getting another guitar, that way you have one for your standard and drop D stuff and one for your drop C stuff. I recommend just putting a few bucks away every week and you'll eventually have enough. what kind of guitar do you have know? and how much did it cost?
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#17
Quote by Arby911
For perspective I ran calculations for 3 string gauge sets, Ernie Ball Regular, Power and Beefy slinky.

Regular has 102# of tension in standard tuning, 78# dropped as your example.

Power has 118# in standard, 91# dropped

Beefy has 145# standard, 135# dropped


Based on that it seems to me your best compromise between floppy and excessive for your particular needs is the Power slinky set.

Hope that helps.



thank you Arb it did help


Quote by krypticguitar87
okay so its standard, drop C, and drop D....

alright just going from standard to drop D shouldn't make too much of a difference in string life. however changing to drop C on a pretty regular basis is much more wear and tear on the strings.

I would strongly recommend getting another guitar, that way you have one for your standard and drop D stuff and one for your drop C stuff. I recommend just putting a few bucks away every week and you'll eventually have enough. what kind of guitar do you have know? and how much did it cost?



I have a Les Paul midnight custom, cost $1250. EMG pick-ups. its AWESOME for heavy music. Im currently saving for an acoustic though, since ive been getting regular acoustic gigs and am constantly having to borrow a friends not-so-good acoustic.


i also own a fender strat, but its not very good. ive actually tried tuning it down before and bringing it to band rehearsal but its so much harder to play and sounds like crap most of the time, but maybe it will have to do until i can afford a decent guitar =\
#18
Quote by MissPopo
thank you Arb it did help


I have a Les Paul midnight custom, cost $1250. EMG pick-ups. its AWESOME for heavy music. Im currently saving for an acoustic though, since ive been getting regular acoustic gigs and am constantly having to borrow a friends not-so-good acoustic.


i also own a fender strat, but its not very good. ive actually tried tuning it down before and bringing it to band rehearsal but its so much harder to play and sounds like crap most of the time, but maybe it will have to do until i can afford a decent guitar =\


I would use the fender in the band you jam with the least, the one when you play in Drop C, you should use thicker strings and set up your guitar for that tuning. personally you want to use hybrids, I can totally relate cuz I atually use hybrid strings. I use them on my standard tuned guitar and I use power slinkys on my open C guitar, I've also usedthe power slinkys for drop C so I would recommend those, unless you already have a preference for Drop Tuning strings. good luck!
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#19
I use the Rotosound light top heavy bottom strings for drop c an drop d an standard tuning, I believe they are .10's.