#1
This is my first time on the Recordings forum, and I'm not very familiar with the rules. So excuse my if there's already a thread like this.

I want to know if there's a way to get rid of that background noise you get when you aren't playing anything.
That sort of weird hissing sound, I don't know what to call it.

I use Mixcraft 5.1 and a Sennheiser EW100 in case you need to know.

Thanks!
#2
Most of the time BG noise can't be resolved without a proper recording room.

One thing you can try and do is in the mixing process roll off the frequencies the hiss occurs at.
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#3
What do you mean by roll off the frequencies?

Sorry I'm just a total noob when it comes to recording, haven't been doing it long at all.
#4
he means taking eq and dropping frequencies. By isolating the offending sounds you can usually decrease it. Be careful you don't eliminate the rest of your music though.

But ya without a sound booths and good equipment. A little bit of hiss is gonna be hard to get rid of.

When recording try and get each track as clean sounding as possible. The build of that hiss can be a lot.
#6
Personally i'd add in a noise gate as well as eq'ing out the hissing frequencies just to be sure. EQ should be more than adequate though, i'm just a perfectionist :p
#8
what kind of analog to digital converters do you have?? Is it the stock soundcard in your computer? Are you on a laptop? I would suggest switching your mixer output to -10 instead of +4 if you can you will get more headroom.
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#9
Quote by abitofinger
what kind of analog to digital converters do you have?? Is it the stock soundcard in your computer? Are you on a laptop? I would suggest switching your mixer output to -10 instead of +4 if you can you will get more headroom.

I've abandoned this thread sorry

Well at the time I was just starting out, so I hadn't a clue what I was doing, I read up a little more about it.

I wasn't using a mixer at all, I was just using a microphone and plugging it straight into my computer's soundcard, plus my cable was pretty weak.

Right now I'm trying my best to get an analog mixer and an interface.

It didn't have much to do with background noise (at the time, I thought it was), it was just the terrible cable I used, and the fact that I'm plugging it straight into my computer. Also my AF setting was too high on the mic.

Thanks everyone
Last edited by ali.guitarkid7 at Aug 14, 2011,
#10
Try to find a DeNoising plugin. I use Cubase's own DeNoiser and it really helps tone down the slight humms/buzz
#11
People are talking about how to get rid of it rather than how to avoid it.

*Sometimes* it can be the result of a bad room, but more than not, it is one of the following:
-too much gain on the mic preamp - turn the gain on the mic input down
-cheap mic - get a better mic (this doesn't seem to be your problem, though the fact you are using a wireless mic could be suspect)
-bad cord - use a better cord ( you seem to have sussed that one out already though)
-low quality preamp that just sounds "hissy" - get a proper interface. It sounds like *this* might be your problem, from how you've described it.

CT
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