#1
Ok so I'm working on learning the notes of the fretboard/chords/keys and it's definitely going to take a lot of time/effort until I can seemlessly recognize a note and then know what the 9th of that note is or whatever to put into a solo.

So until that time comes I'm going to start using quasi-patterns.

Are these patterns correct and can you guys tell me what the actual intervals are called?

Note that when say "the 9th" I mean if you were to create an E9 or EMaj9, the note that you add to make it a 9th chord.

1. the 9th is a whole step forward from the root (E -> F#)
2. the 11th (or 4th) is a perfect fourth from the root (E -> A)
3. the 13th (or 6th) is a minor third lower than the root (E -> C#)
4. the dominant 7th is a whole step back from the root (E -> D)
5. the major 7th is a half step back from the root (E -> D#)
6. the minor 7th is the same relative to the root as the dominant 7th

Are these correct? And what are the intervals called that i left out? like a minor third back from the root etc...

Thanks!
#3
Quote by -TM-
Ok so I'm working on learning the notes of the fretboard/chords/keys and it's definitely going to take a lot of time/effort until I can seemlessly recognize a note and then know what the 9th of that note is or whatever to put into a solo.

So until that time comes I'm going to start using quasi-patterns.

Are these patterns correct and can you guys tell me what the actual intervals are called?

Note that when say "the 9th" I mean if you were to create an E9 or EMaj9, the note that you add to make it a 9th chord.

1. the 9th is a whole step forward from the root (E -> F#)
2. the 11th (or 4th) is a perfect fourth from the root (E -> A)
3. the 13th (or 6th) is a minor third lower than the root (E -> C#)
4. the dominant 7th is a whole step back from the root (E -> D)
5. the major 7th is a half step back from the root (E -> D#)
6. the minor 7th is the same relative to the root as the dominant 7th

Are these correct? And what are the intervals called that i left out? like a minor third back from the root etc...

Thanks!


Yes these are correct.

The only thing, I'd add is that in a Major triad, a 4th would create a min 2nd dissonance with the 3rd, so you usually will see the 11 raised to be a #11.

Best,

Sean
#4
Quote by -TM-
Ok so I'm working on learning the notes of the fretboard/chords/keys and it's definitely going to take a lot of time/effort until I can seemlessly recognize a note and then know what the 9th of that note is or whatever to put into a solo.

So until that time comes I'm going to start using quasi-patterns.

Are these patterns correct and can you guys tell me what the actual intervals are called?

Note that when say "the 9th" I mean if you were to create an E9 or EMaj9, the note that you add to make it a 9th chord.

1. the 9th is a whole step forward from the root (E -> F#)
2. the 11th (or 4th) is a perfect fourth from the root (E -> A)
3. the 13th (or 6th) is a minor third lower than the root (E -> C#)
4. the dominant 7th is a whole step back from the root (E -> D)
5. the major 7th is a half step back from the root (E -> D#)
6. the minor 7th is the same relative to the root as the dominant 7th

Are these correct? And what are the intervals called that i left out? like a minor third back from the root etc...

Thanks!


it's better to understand that the 9th is a 9th from the root, not a whole step from the root. a whole step from the root is not a 9th, it's a 2nd. they'll both have the same pitch class (i.e. F#), but they'll be an octave apart. usually in chords, octave placement is irrelevant, but in naming intervals, you don't play an E and then play the F# two frets above it and call it a 9th.

best to call it what it is, if your goal is to be able to use it.
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