#1
Alright, so I don't quite know how to practice it. Very straightforward.
I've been banned for 30 days and haven't really monitored this thread that much. If this thread isn't supposed to be here, or that there's another, my bad.

Anyways, how do I really practice it?
I don't know much about 16ths at ___bpm or whatever, but I can play alright.
Sorry this isn't very informative.

Also another question:

How do I know if I'm doing double bass with the correct technique? I try and keep my legs as relaxed as I can.
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Last edited by skylerjames13 at May 16, 2011,
#2
Well, if you don't know about rhythm theory, then you... should? If you genuinely want to improve your speed, anyway. Plus it's crucial to understanding how beats are created.

But, there's no difference between working on double bass and working on your hands, really. Just do it over and over. That's basically it, other than make sure to play with good technique and stuff. It's important to sustain it for long periods of time instead of for a single beat or something.
Last edited by Steve08 at May 15, 2011,
#3
How/where the hell am I supposed to learn about rhythm theory? Music theory is ****ing enough.
And how do I know if I'm using good technique or not?
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#4
Set a metronome to a pace that you can accurately keep up with on the double bass and work at that speed until your endurance is up, then slightly increase the tempo on the metronome making sure every time you increase that you can accurately keep up with the tempo for long periods of play.




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#5
I play along with songs that way. Though sometimes my double bass is inconsistent and difficult to maintain fast notes for a period of time.

I shall try the metronome trick though, thanks.
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#6
Quote by skylerjames13
How/where the hell am I supposed to learn about rhythm theory? Music theory is ****ing enough.
And how do I know if I'm using good technique or not?
I don't know, it's pretty intuitive, just start trying to work out ideas rhythmically (I use Tuxguitar since my handwriting is atrocious and slow, lol), maybe go on places like www.musictheory.net

Basically, a quarter note is the tempo of a given song, or how fast it is. 8th notes are twice as fast as a quarter note, so two 8th notes fit in the space of one quarter note. So in a measure of 4/4 (which = 4 quarters) has eight 8th notes. 16ths are twice as fast as 8th notes and so four 16th notes fit in the space of one quarter note. The most common usage of double bass is constant 16th notes, so you'd be playing four notes for every metronome count for... about as long as you want, really.

For technique, just sit with good posture, make sure your lower back is strong enough to hold your legs up (for heel up-- heel down doesn't require this as the motion starts at the knee) and make sure your feet never leave the pedals. As you get faster you want to start using more of your ankles as opposed to the motion of your legs, although there will always be some leg motion involved until you reach about 210-220 bpm.

If you have no double bass chops at all, then start VERY SLOW, I'm talking about 8th notes at 100 bpm slow, and practice the basic motions for long periods of time (5-10 minutes). Yes it's boring as hell, but your legs have so much more physics involved as compared to your hands and you can't rush their development. Bump it up a metronome setting or two each day. When your feet start getting faster, start mixing in 16th or 32nd notes at a given tempo.

Stuff like this is incredibly useful: http://georgekollias.com/tips/16week/tips_page_16week_3.htm

Another exercise that's very useful would be to pound the double bass as hard as humanly possible, at a tempo that you can maintain for a long period of time, WITHOUT STOPPING, try doing this for about 5 minutes (or maybe a bit less) at first.
Last edited by Steve08 at May 16, 2011,
#7
OH.
Yeah, I know what whole notes, half, quarter, sixteenth notes, etc are. I was just a bit confused my bad. Thanks a lot for all the info though!
I do practice slowly a bit. And I try to make sure my posture is right. How do I know if the pedals are too close/far away? And same with the rest of my kit?
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#8
Of course

Stuff like that is all preference, really. Just experiment until everything feels the most comfortable to you. For the rest of the kit, though, you want everything to be easy to hit-- for example, there's no reason to stretch your arm out really far to hit a crash cymbal when it's just as easy to move it close enough so that your arm doesn't go any further than your side. Same with ride cymbal and hi-hat placement. Also, for me at least, since I use my ankles a lot, I sit back a little so that my legs are at a slight angle. I think having your legs at a slight angle instead of a really steep one is more comfortable in general.

So basically... if something doesn't feel right, mess with it until it does.
#9
Quote by Steve08
Of course

Stuff like that is all preference, really. Just experiment until everything feels the most comfortable to you. For the rest of the kit, though, you want everything to be easy to hit-- for example, there's no reason to stretch your arm out really far to hit a crash cymbal when it's just as easy to move it close enough so that your arm doesn't go any further than your side. Same with ride cymbal and hi-hat placement. Also, for me at least, since I use my ankles a lot, I sit back a little so that my legs are at a slight angle. I think having your legs at a slight angle instead of a really steep one is more comfortable in general.

So basically... if something doesn't feel right, mess with it until it does.


Sorry for such the late response.
I have things close so that I can hit them easy. I have still yet to find the perfect position for my pedals so that they are comfortable while doing fast action and slow action, ya know?
Anyways, thanks a lot for the help dude!
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You look like a young Eugene Levy, but with a moustache.

Quote by slapsymcdougal
Quote by Dreadnought
Kicking a man when he's down, I'm proud of you

When they're down is the safest time.

Soundcloud
Sharks Stanley Cup 15-16
Sharks Stanley Cup 16-17,,,,?
#14
Tre, Steve, gtfo lol. Making me feel worthless.
Quote by jettchan
best bet is have a metronome to guide you along the way, look for some videos analyze how other plays.


And yeah, once I get off my ass, I think I will do that. Thanks!
Quote by DonGlover

You look like a young Eugene Levy, but with a moustache.

Quote by slapsymcdougal
Quote by Dreadnought
Kicking a man when he's down, I'm proud of you

When they're down is the safest time.

Soundcloud
Sharks Stanley Cup 15-16
Sharks Stanley Cup 16-17,,,,?
#15
Quote by skylerjames13
I play along with songs that way. Though sometimes my double bass is inconsistent and difficult to maintain fast notes for a period of time.

Then you're going to fast. Gaining speed with the double bass is exactly the same as gaining speed with anything else: You need to start slow and slowly build up your stamina, control and speed while practicing to a metronome.

This cannot be stressed enough, always practice speed to a metronome, and try and get a little faster each time.

What I find helpful is starting at a speed I feel comfortable playing 16th notes at, like, say, 120. So I do straight 16ths for a while, then bump the speed up to 125. At that speed I have to struggle and concentrate a little more to keep the 16th notes consistant, but I can still make it. I do that for a while, then bump it up to 130. I cannot do straight 16ths for an extended period of time at that speed cleanly, so I play a simple beat instead. This allows me to do short bursts of 16ths at that speed, and I keep on trying to add another note to the burst each time I practice.

So on the first try it'd be something like this:

ooo-o-o-o-o-ooo-o-o-o-o

Then the next time maybe I can already do

oooo-o-o-o-o-oooo-o-o-o-o

etc.

I've been using this way of practicing for both my hands, feet on drums, and right hand for picking on guitar and it's always worked really great for me.