#1
I'm currently learning Canon in drop d on my acoustic guitar, and the chord progression is listed as D A Bm F#m G D G A. I've notice that both the D chords and both the G chords are play differently, yet they are still D and G major.

The D chords are like this:

-2--------x-
-3--------3-
-2--------2-
-0--------4-
-x--------x-
-x--------0-

Are they named differently? Like D major "something"? I mean how do you know what to play if you don't have sheet music? I'm a little weak in the theory department, so I'm little lost here.
#2
Quote by whereeaglesdare
I'm currently learning Canon in drop d on my acoustic guitar, and the chord progression is listed as D A Bm F#m G D G A. I've notice that both the D chords and both the G chords are play differently, yet they are still D and G major.

The D chords are like this:

-2--------x-
-3--------3-
-2--------2-
-0--------4-
-x--------x-
-x--------0-

Are they named differently? Like D major "something"? I mean how do you know what to play if you don't have sheet music? I'm a little weak in the theory department, so I'm little lost here.


A chord's name is defined by the notes it has in it, not where it's played on the neck, both of those should only have D, F# and A in them.

You know by... well really there is no way of knowing, the best thing you can do is learn about chord construction so that if you pick a version of, for argument's sake, D and it doesn't sound quite right you can find another one and another one until you hit one that fits.
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#3
Ah ok. So I just need to memorize all the patterns for the chord and use the one that fits the best. Thanks for the quick reply
#4
The first is a D Major and the next one is a D/E chord or a D over E major chord. Hope I helped you

Also, you can play the open A string on the D/E chord if you prefer.
Last edited by Naruto00121 at May 16, 2011,
#5
Quote by whereeaglesdare
Ah ok. So I just need to memorize all the patterns for the chord and use the one that fits the best. Thanks for the quick reply


Yes and no. Really you're infinitely better off learning how to build chords than you are trying to memorise all the possible ways of playing any given chord.
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#6
So, I need to learn how to construct a chord, and why each chord is made up of each individual note. That definitely points me in the right direction. One more quick question.
Since both those D majors are made up of single D, A and F# notes, can I assume EVERY D major is made up of only those notes?
#7
Naruto 00121 is wrong here because he's not taking the drop D tuning in consideration, both voicings are honest-to-god D Major ;-D
#8
Quote by whereeaglesdare
So, I need to learn how to construct a chord, and why each chord is made up of each individual note. That definitely points me in the right direction. One more quick question.
Since both those D majors are made up of single D, A and F# notes, can I assume EVERY D major is made up of only those notes?


If it has any different notes in it that changes the name of the chord, yes.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#9
Quote by guitarrios
Naruto 00121 is wrong here because he's not taking the drop D tuning in consideration, both voicings are honest-to-god D Major ;-D


Sorry, my mistake
#10
Yep, they're both D major chords. I just started learning the very basics of music theory today and found this video to be very helpful. Yeah it's just about intervals and scales but something that simple really helped me understand how chords are constructed. Like that second D chord is made of a root, major 3rd, 5th and an octave (hope i got that right).
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#11
To the OP and anyone else who wants to know how to construct chords, i'll give a (relatively) brief explanation.

The distance between any two frets on the fretboard is called an interval. The intervals go like this: Root, Minor 2nd, Major 2nd, Minor 3rd, Major 3rd, Perfect 4th, Tritone, Perfect Fifth, Minor 6th, Major 6th, Minor 7th, Major 7th. Using combinations of different intervals, we build chords and scales. For example, in the key of A, a root could be the 5th fret of your low E string. The Minor 2nd would be the 6th fret, or A#/Bb.

Major chords are formed from a Root, a Major 3rd and a Perfect Fifth. This will give you a major Triad. The example you used is a D Major chord. The notes in a D Major are D, F# and A (in that order of intervals). D is the root, F# is the Major 3rd, and A is the Perfect 5th. In the standard open D Major chord, you have a D(root, open D string), an A (Perfect Fifth, 2nd fret G string), another D (root, 3rd fret B string), and finally an F# (Major 3rd, 2nd fret high e string). As you can see, a chord isn't limited to one of each interval. Use this formula (Root, Major 3rd, Perfect Fifth) for any Major chord.

Minor chords are just as easy. They're made up of a Root, a MINOR 3rd, and a Perfect Fifth. Let's use D Minor as an example. To make a D Major chord into a D Minor chord, we replace the Major 3rd with a Minor 3rd. There's only one Major 3rd in an Open D Major chord (the 2nd fret on the High e string), so we just lower it one fret (to the 1st fret of the High e). That's a D Minor chord. Just use this formula (Root, Minor 3rd, Perfect Fifth) for any Minor chord.

I won't go into detail about dominant chords and such (7th, 9th, 11th, 13th) or suspended, diminished e.c.t. With a basic knowledge of intervals and a little research, you can figure this out yourself. Hope this helps

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#12
The only difference between those two is the voicing. That is, the order of the notes is different. The second is also an octave lower than the first, with a different high note. Learn about inversions, that should help. For right now, all you really need to know is that they are both D major chords, they're just different voicings and inversions of a D major chord.
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