#1
Now I'm not talking about someone using a 5 watt 6" speaker with a volume control and a boost button mic'd with a $20 PC microphone here..

I own a Vox VT20+ amp and a handful of really nice guitars and I get a really awesome tone even though I play it at around 5-10 watts at most (it has variable wattage control.. or some gimmicky version of it).

With that I use a Audio Technica AT2020+ Large diaphragm condenser usually mic'd a hair off the grill and just off center from the speaker and I generally get a nice recording sound from it into Reaper.

Do you reckon this is genuinely OK for recording 'serious' stuff.. obviously I'll never be able to record nice saturated cranked tube sounds.. but for all intents and purposes could this be a very viable home recording setup?

Now I know higher quality amps and recording gear and the recording 'setting' will make everything better in step but the question is not is low-end gear better than high end.. the question is when does it become TOO low-end to even be worth recording? (within reason, again.. not $20 mics and starter pack practice amps).
Sparrow Twangmaster Telecaster
G&L Legacy Stratocaster

Korg Pitchblack > Fuzz Face > Tubescreamer -> Crybaby -> Modded SD-1 -> Big Muff -> Phaser -> El Capistan -> TS-1 Tremolo/Stereo-Pan

Vox VT20+
#2
Remember that you can change quite a lot of your guitar tone during the mixing stage by EQing. My guitars sound quite thin and weak when i record it but in the final mix they sound fat and fill out the sound nicely.

I would say you have a 'good enough' setup, just make sure your guitars sit nicely in the mix. People tend to blame their set-up if their overall mix sounds bad but as long as there's no muddiness and overlapping frequencies it should sound ok
#3
Yeah, I mean I'm still in the learning process but just through performing in a band I've learned that.. the neck pickup is a no-no unless you can make it kick the drummer and bassist in the face.. and you never need as much bass as you use say alone at home.

It's interesting how at home lots of bass fills out lovely on bass or treble pickup positions but in a mix on treble pickups with the bass rolled doooown it still fills out really well.

I never did appreciate the 'science' to it until the start of this year and I was a fool cranking the bass and going all-neck on my strat while jamming with friends.
Sparrow Twangmaster Telecaster
G&L Legacy Stratocaster

Korg Pitchblack > Fuzz Face > Tubescreamer -> Crybaby -> Modded SD-1 -> Big Muff -> Phaser -> El Capistan -> TS-1 Tremolo/Stereo-Pan

Vox VT20+
#4
I think as long as you have a pair of monitors (at least Rokits), an interface, a condenser mic (heck I use a Behringer C-1 sometimes which is super cheap) and I am very happy (and get compliments on recording quality) with that recording set up.

I think how you mix has a lot to do with quality of your sound.
#5
To be honest, there's really no cut off. If you know how to use the gear, no matter how cheap it is, you can probably find a useful application for it. A lot of people get much too caught up in things completely unrelated to music such as the manufacturer of a product, settings on that product ect, and lose sight of what's important: does it sound good? If you like the sound you're getting from your equipment, it's good enough for a serious recording.
#6
Keep going with what you have. When you start wanting more from your setup, learn how to do it in the box. Once you can't improve your setup any more, it's time to upgrade.
#7
Quote by Odirunn
To be honest, there's really no cut off. If you know how to use the gear, no matter how cheap it is, you can probably find a useful application for it.


This

An old band I was in actually recorded an album in our friends basement recording all instruments at the same time through a behringer mixer direct into my friends macbook and audacity. We used some of the shittiest mics ever on some of the shittiest gear ever and by the end of it, we were impressed with the results. It wasn't pro by any means but for what we were going for (Early 90's Pop Punk), it came out pretty good.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#8
The cutoff is where the listener thinks it is.

Some people get all "whoa! That sounds brilliant!!" in the cover recordings subforum on stuff that is really... just... meh. Other people get all nit picky and moan about how Death Magnetic sounds so horrible because of the over compression.

Different listeners obviously have different standards. They have no idea what equipment you used, and probably never will - nor will they care, for the most part. They'll just know whether or not it sounds great.

The problem is, if your recordings don't meet the standards of your listeners, determining whether the problem is the tools or the use of the tools. It's easier to blame the tools, but not always the most honest.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Quote by axemanchris
Some people get all "whoa! That sounds brilliant!!" in the cover recordings subforum on stuff that is really... just... meh.



One of the three main reasons I never go there...