#1
arghhh stuck learning a song do you know what these chords are?
e7
b8
g8
d8
a7
E7

e7
b7
g7
d7
a7
E7

e
b
g8
d9
a9
E7
#2
The last one is just B major.

I haven't looked at the other ones properly as I'm in the middle of cooking but I'm sure someone will...
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#3
E/B an E major with an B (fifth) in the bass(second inversion)
Bm7sus4 (not sure if this is the right name, since it has a d(minor third) so i dont think it can be a suspended chord)
Bmaj
Last edited by crohno at May 16, 2011,
#4
The First one is an E major with a B in the bass. The second is a Bm11 and the third is just a B major.

Edit: I looked at the first one wrong. Its actually an E min/maj7 #11

Double Edit: The first one could also be D# 13/b9

Triple Edit: yet another name for the the first one would be Bmaj7 #5/11

Honestly, with that many chord tones, any of the notes could be the root. Its best to know the theory behind naming chords and their function within the context of the progression, that way you can name them correctly within your piece.
Sig What?
Last edited by darth awsome at May 16, 2011,
#6
first one looks like a Bmaj11, the second is an E9sus4
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#8
thanks guys, i'll try and have a look and figure some stuff out. Cheers for your help. Helen
#9
You can't say what the chords really are unless you state what key the song is in. Virtually every chord can be called something else depending on the key.
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