#1
Hi my names Robbie.a and i,m a new member of the forum. I have been playing guitar for about 2 years now.I can play about 20 or so chords, all open chords.I play in the keys of G,C and D. and then use a capo.All the songs i play, i transpose into these keys. My question is this; can all songs be made simple to fit the chords that i,m familiar with.
I play alot of the Everly brothers songs but alot of the songs i like , i either can,t find or can,t transpose. I like the songs that are not commercial, you know album songs.
I have figured out a couple of songs by myself, but its quite difficult at my level. I want to improve and i know only time and hours will do this. I love all rock,n roll , 50,s and 60,s music. I play a Gretsch 5120.
Oh one other question; i am self taught, do you think a teacher is my next step as i seem to be a little stuck.
Thanks for listening, any help will be appreciated
robbie.a
#2
A lot of songs will follow a similar pattern (Check out "Axis of Awesome - The 4 Chord Song" for proof), however, a number of songs won't. You should try learning to play bar chords, they'll be difficult at first but once you get the hang of them, you will be able to play every chord progression (though maybe a touch simplified in some cases). This site has some great lessons for them.

A good teacher is always helpful but is by no means necessary. However, it can be really helpful to get you going again, so yes I would fully recommend finding one.

Good luck!
#3
Hey, thanks for answering. I knew barre chords would be the next thing. I have tried them briefly, will definately take some practising!
I have another question if its not to cheeky!
If i,m playing a song in the key of G, and i want to do a little lead solo, does it have to be from the G major scale. Thanks
#4
Well basically every chord (and I suppose every song for that matter) CAN be played in open position, even all those rare chords such as diminished, or tertian (your 9's, 11's, and 13's) can all be played in open, though you'll run into voicing problems since many don't sound that well in open.

Here's the thing. I'm an arranger and what I've found is when you take a complicated song, full of all these wild chords your probably not used to and an integrated melody, it can be simplified to fit your needs, HOWEVER, taking a song and simplifying it DOWN often times is far less interesting and impressive (and boring sounding) then when you take a simple song, with a sung melody, and transpose it for say solo guitar, and essentially make it sound way better, and interesting, though not actually changing it from its original state, rather your adapting it.

So I would say that a guitar teacher would absolutely be beneficial, as long as he's a real "teacher" and not just those punks that show you how to play metallica tabs and take your money. You need someone with great theory knowledge and more importantly someone who will constantly push you, and keep pushing you, driving you to your full potential. If you want to start transposing and arranging, a greater knowledge of theory would be extremely beneficial and it is often times way easier to have an instructor teach it to you, and relate it to guitar. Basically what I'm saying is its one thing to read and learn from a theory book or website, its an entirely different thing to actually apply it and use it wisely with your actual instrument.
#5
Quote by robbie.a
Hey, thanks for answering. I knew barre chords would be the next thing. I have tried them briefly, will definately take some practising!
I have another question if its not to cheeky!
If i,m playing a song in the key of G, and i want to do a little lead solo, does it have to be from the G major scale. Thanks

Well you could play the E minor Pentatonic, however, all the notes in it are in the G major scale, which doesn't really answer your question...

Another thing you can try is playing in the scale of the chord you're playing over, the G major key consists of G Am Bm C D Em F#dim. Playing G major over any of these will sound ok, but equally you could play the D major scale over D (and also Em and Bm as they are also in the key of D), and so on and so forth.