#1
I'm trying to explain the concept of finger tapping to my friend, but I'm not sure how I should go about explaining it. I always just looked at it as something you just learn and then do, and simply showing him isn't helping. Basically, isn't tapping a scale with an extra note attached?
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#2
Tapping is just fretting with your picking hand, usually legato as obviously you can't pick when your picking hand is busy fretting

It's not tied to any notes or anything, it's just a physical means to get notes that are beyond the reach of your fretting hand.
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#3
Quote by 6StringBlazer
I'm trying to explain the concept of finger tapping to my friend, but I'm not sure how I should go about explaining it. I always just looked at it as something you just learn and then do, and simply showing him isn't helping. Basically, isn't tapping a scale with an extra note attached?



No, tapping is a technique.

Right hand tapping should just be considered an extension of legato, because that is what it is. It's the same mechanics as a left-hand hammer-on or pull-off.

Edit: Ninja'd.
#4
Nope, because you could play that same scale without tapping at all if you're fast enough. Also, you could add a lot more notes than just 1 by alternating between your 2 hands, so I really don't see the point of involving traditional music theory when describing tapping

Tapping is a technique which involves playing notes by using hammer-ons and pulloffs exclusively (of course you could add slides and bends, but those are just additional techniques...). Because you're producing these sounds with just your fretting hand there is no need to strum anything with your picking hand, thus enabling you to use both of your hands to tap notes on the fretboard. Of course you could just use your left hand, but since that technique was way more common long before tapping rose to popularity (not that it didn't exist before the 70's in one way or another) we tend to just call that "hammering on and pulling off", even though the technique is basically the same

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#5
Quote by 6StringBlazer
I'm trying to explain the concept of finger tapping to my friend, but I'm not sure how I should go about explaining it. I always just looked at it as something you just learn and then do, and simply showing him isn't helping. Basically, isn't tapping a scale with an extra note attached?

Tell him to do the outside string (high E string) first. Practice tapping open like 0-12-0-12-0-13-0-15 or something like that. Middle finger IMO works best.

Tell him to just lock himself in his room for 30 hour blocks with 10 minute breaks for the first few days when he's learning it cause his fingers will need to adjust.

After 4-5 days, then he can start spending 10 hours or so practicing techniques a day.