#1
I've been thinking about picking up the guitar, and after 2-3 weeks of searching, I think I may have to invest in some 1-on-1. Currently, I'm 15, and I feel that I have a lot of potential if I stick to my guns and learn. I have a pretty basic set-up, but I'm thankful and lucky I have an amp, a Squier Strat, and a distortion box. I probably have it easier than others, so I want to take advantage of this and see what I can do.

I can play some VERY basic stuff. For example, the simple but catchy verse of Nirvana's "Come As You Are" is my favorite thing to play, and I've seem to have the verse of "Heart-Shaped Box" down. However, I'm not learning very much in this, and besides the calluse I have in my pointer finger, I don't seem to benefit much [but it's certainly better than not playing ]

I apologize for the long post, but should I invest into some lessons at my local music shop or give it another try on my own? I seem to give up when I change Open Chords. I'm slow, but I have the majors memorized.

Thanks!


I've also been saving for a Telecaster, but I don't want to buy it while I'm still a beginner. When I feel as though I've progressing, I'll be looking at some Mexican Teles.
#2
Get a teacher. I wish I immediately got a teacher when I started instead of waiting years - if youve got the money go for it.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at May 16, 2011,
#3
There is really little to no advantage of going self taught. Most of the self taught people I know did it just to fuel thier egos.

Get a teacher, but make sure you get a really good one. Since guitar is such a popular instrument you can end up with a medioker teacher pretty easly. Look around and find a teacher who if you can find one, has a professional career.
#5
The word self-taught is used incorrectly if you ask me.

The internet is a treasure trove of lessons, and while you have no interaction with them, they are teaching you.

Of course I am not arguing that a teacher is of poor choice, rather there is benefit from one-on-one mentorship and online instruction as the internet offers a wide variety. The only problem i've ever seen with guitar lessons is the student hangs on to every word the instructor says and refuses to listen or seek out any new advice.
#6
I'd advise you to get a teacher. Unless you're really determined, self-tutoring won't get you far. You need an experienced player to teach you the discipline that will keep you interested in learning and practicing. My self-taught friend has been playing guitar for at least 6 years and has been in a number of bands. I started taking lessons 4 years ago and I'd say I am a bit more advanced than him. Trust me, having a teacher pays off BIG TIME.

Also, when you learn from another player, certain styles of music can rub off on you as a result. For instance, I gained my interest in jazz and latin from my teacher and I also started off playing fingerstyle on classical pieces, simple ones of course (forgive me if I sound pompous lol).
Last edited by Andrew C. S. at May 16, 2011,
#7
Hey man! About a year and a half ago, I was in your position (except I was 13, not 15). Anyway, do to lack of money, I was pretty much forced to teach myself. However, I would've done so either way, and I'm definately glad I did. Here's why:

I think the biggest thing is that when you teach yourself, you develop a more unique style of playing, as to where when someone teaches you, you may end up and play like them, instead of developing your own style. This is just part of the mentality that I've had towards lessons.

Another thing, is I think you could learn quicker by yourself, because then you can move at your own pace, and you can determine for yourself when you are ready to learn new techniques. This way, you aren't forced to learn something if you don't think you're skilled enough.

Also, teaching yourself is free, except for maybe the cost of a book or two. However, with the internet, you might not even need any books. Another good thing about it being free, is that if you decide down the road that you don't really want to play any more, no money was wasted in trying to do so.

So definately I would recomend teaching yourself. There is also a good tip I have for you if you choose to teach yourself: while learning your chords is important, learning power chords is very important as well. You mentioned some Nirvana songs, and songs in that genre of music use power chords a lot. Personally, I spent a long time just trying to learn chords, and I almost stopped trying to learn guitar because none of the songs I listened to (Metallica, Anthrax, Megadeth, Nirvana, etc.) used a lot of chords. But then I discovered that a lot of power chords were used, and then the guitar became really easy for me. So just remember to learn power chords.

And on a final note, I would make sure you play brands of guitar other than just Fender (if you haven't already) before you buy a new guitar, because I thought ESP's were really cool, but when I played them, they weren't as good as I thought they'd be. There might be a brand of guitar that you like even more than Fenders. However, if you've already tried multiple brands of guitar and you like Fender the best, there's nothing wrong with that. As long as you're sure you like Fender the best. It wouldn't be good to buy an expensive guitar, only to find out there's a different one you like better.

Also, sorry for the lengthly post, I hope you don't mind.
METAL RLZ
#8
Quote by metalhed0294
Hey man! About a year and a half ago, I was in your position (except I was 13, not 15). Anyway, do to lack of money, I was pretty much forced to teach myself. However, I would've done so either way, and I'm definately glad I did. Here's why:

I think the biggest thing is that when you teach yourself, you develop a more unique style of playing, as to where when someone teaches you, you may end up and play like them, instead of developing your own style. This is just part of the mentality that I've had towards lessons.

Another thing, is I think you could learn quicker by yourself, because then you can move at your own pace, and you can determine for yourself when you are ready to learn new techniques. This way, you aren't forced to learn something if you don't think you're skilled enough.

Also, teaching yourself is free, except for maybe the cost of a book or two. However, with the internet, you might not even need any books. Another good thing about it being free, is that if you decide down the road that you don't really want to play any more, no money was wasted in trying to do so.

So definately I would recomend teaching yourself. There is also a good tip I have for you if you choose to teach yourself: while learning your chords is important, learning power chords is very important as well. You mentioned some Nirvana songs, and songs in that genre of music use power chords a lot. Personally, I spent a long time just trying to learn chords, and I almost stopped trying to learn guitar because none of the songs I listened to (Metallica, Anthrax, Megadeth, Nirvana, etc.) used a lot of chords. But then I discovered that a lot of power chords were used, and then the guitar became really easy for me. So just remember to learn power chords.

And on a final note, I would make sure you play brands of guitar other than just Fender (if you haven't already) before you buy a new guitar, because I thought ESP's were really cool, but when I played them, they weren't as good as I thought they'd be. There might be a brand of guitar that you like even more than Fenders. However, if you've already tried multiple brands of guitar and you like Fender the best, there's nothing wrong with that. As long as you're sure you like Fender the best. It wouldn't be good to buy an expensive guitar, only to find out there's a different one you like better.

Also, sorry for the lengthly post, I hope you don't mind.


A) Good facts. But I'm considering a teacher to learn the good habits. I just want to get the basic stuff over with so I can improvise with my way of play. Power chords are a major build of this genre, but I also want to combine other influences, such as REM and Dinosaur Jr. Sounds weird, but I think it can sound great if I do it right. I'm not a solo guy at all, but songs like REMs "The One I love"and Nirvana's "Blew" are examples of songs that don't really use power chords, but aren't too sophisticated either.

B) I've been looking at much more than Fender. I just like the Telecasters versatility to all kinds of genres, which I think will be great from a beginners point of view. Danelectros aren't too shabby either.

Thanks for your post though. Certainly provides a good argument.
#9
Quote by dkeenan
Thanks for your post though. Certainly provides a good argument.


Mwa ha ha, now watch as I destroy his argument.

A teacher will prevent you from developing bad habits, which is a very important thing for a beginner to consider.


Just as an aside - Thats not why I started going to a teacher, I didnt go to a private teacher (other than music lessons in school which were quite useful useful) till I had been playing about five years, and I had become pretty good but hadnt improved a lot in a frustratingly long time and didnt really know where to go to become an advanced player, needed to stay motivated aswell.


Its worth bearing in mind that just because you are going to a guitar teacher that doesnt mean you arent allowed to use lessons on UG or JustinGuitar or whatever to supplement or re-enforce what your teacher has been teaching you, and I hope that you become a regular visitor to this forum weather you use a teacher or not - its always useful to get different perspectives and it will save you waiting a whole week or however long before you see your teacher if you are looking for some help or advice.


Quote by Kenjisan231
The only problem i've ever seen with guitar lessons is the student hangs on to every word the instructor says and refuses to listen or seek out any new advice.



Its of course very important that the teacher knows what he is talking about, and therfore a student hanging on every word (words that a he is paying good money for) is not necessarily a bad thing. However it is up to the student to be open to other ideas and, as I have already pointed out, a guitar teacher cant (and wouldnt want to) stop you from doing all the research and learning you can, using the internet and books as a resource, in fact Im sure he'd encourage you to do just that.


Quote by metalhed0294
I think the biggest thing is that when you teach yourself, you develop a more unique style of playing, as to where when someone teaches you, you may end up and play like them, instead of developing your own style.



A good guitar teacher should encourage you to be creative. He should make sure you play in the most technically efficient way possible (there are a lot of guitarists with a "unique" style who play sloppily or end up with tendonitis or RSI because of poor technique). He should be able to teach you what you want and need to learn, not just what he wants to teach (youre the one paying him). Personally, if I ended up playing like my guitar teacher Id be happy, the guy is pretty amazing.

Also, a good teacher will also make sure you know the stuff you need to know but cant be bothered learning, like basic theory and all that fun stuff.

+1 to what Andred C.S. said about new styles rubbing off on you - Im learning jazz progressions off my teacher atm. It never hurts to learn new styles and be influenced by things you wouldnt have thought of yourself, as long as you think it sounds good (he shouldnt be forcing a metalhead to play classical against his will lol). Remember he is a much more experienced musician and music listener than you and you can take advantage of that and discover completely new types of music if you want to.


Quote by metalhed0294
Another thing, is I think you could learn quicker by yourself, because then you can move at your own pace, and you can determine for yourself when you are ready to learn new techniques. This way, you aren't forced to learn something if you don't think you're skilled enough.



I dont agree. Sure you should move at your own pace but your teacher should be able to judge what you can handle and what you should move onto. He should push you and motivate you to keep you practising so that you improve more. He should stop you from just staying at the same skill level playing easy songs and keep the momentum going so that you dont get stuck in a rut. Not to mention that if you find any difficulties he will be able to advise you on how to play or what to practice so that you dont get demotivated.


Quote by metalhed0294
... is that if you decide down the road that you don't really want to play any more, no money was wasted in trying to do so.



I didnt go to lessons to begin with partly because I never had money, and now I still have hardly any money so I can understand finances putting someone off. But either way you are spending a lot of time practicing guitar so it will still be a waste if you give it up playing. Whats more I believe that you will improve much faster if you get a good teacher so your time will have been better spent and you are less likely to become demotivated and bored with it and give up. Of course if you are a determined individual you are going to learn to play and keep at it weather you have a teacher or not, Im proof of that (and two of my mates who started with lessons have since given up, so it is an individual thing mostly). If you have do the money though I would definitely recommend getting a teacher.


One important last point is this - Everything I have said in support of getting a teacher depends on your teacher being good. There are many crap guitarists out there who think they can teach and If you are in a big city dont be afraid to try a few if the first guy just seems like a stoner with a guitar. Also, there are impressive, highly skilled guitarists who will be crap teachers with bad communication skills etc. Try get a guy who is qualified or works at a college or something. And watch this video;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xe9YcejA4nM&feature=channel_video_title


Just as an aside, don't spend too much time worrying about what next guitar to get when you are ages away from getting it - if youre anything like me by the time you have that money saved you will have changed your mind five times anyway.

Good Luck
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at May 16, 2011,
#10
get a teacher man, there is no benefit to being self taught, or at least I've never heard an argument that has ever made sense. yes I read metalhed0294's post, and every point he has, a good teacher wil help you achieve, thats right your own sound, your own opinions, learning at your own pace. the only plus side is it's cheaper, but honestly learning how to play correctly and how not to hurt yourself or break the guitar while playing is worth more than what you would pay for lessons.

bottom line man, get a teacher. then you can learn how to play right the first time, and you will have a point of reference for any questions you have. Good luck!
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#11
I'm self taught. I learned how to string skip, sweep, tap, blahblabhl all on my own. The only instructional vids i watched were ones like paul giblerts "get out of my yard" which just teaches you how to play his album, not really improve your technique. but don't get me wrong. I will say that when i jam with a friend for about a week, i learn loads more information than i normally would, and i tighten up my playing thanks to an outside point of view and seeing how others do stuff. And the learning really is mutual that way too so if you are looking for a free way to learn, just find a lot of guitar friends. You'll probably end up teaching them too. But you really should get a teacher. In the beginning it took me a month to figure out what the **** a harmonic was. I kept seeing it on tabs and i was like, WTF is a harmonic???? But I eventually figured it out and I really wish i had a teacher to tell me what the hell it was so i could move on faster than i did. lol
Last edited by DiminishDarknut at May 17, 2011,
#12
Well I was self taught for a few years and I found that my lead wasn't as good as it could be (still learning it now) so I have been going to a teacher and learning theory and scales and good technique, and i am Lear Omg faster than I could alone
Running through:

Engl Fireball
Engl Slanted Cab
Ibanez Xiphos
Schecter C-1 FR Black
Ibanez GRG (on its way)

Pedals:
Boss Noise Gate, Zakk Wylde Overdrive, Boss Tuner, Zakk Wylde Wah.
#13
I honestly don't remember jack or shit from when I took guitar lessons. 2 Important things you should know, which will probably bite you in the ass like it is for me now is

1) Hold your pick the right way.
Not only will you get B.S. from elitists, but it helps out in the long run.
2) Don't anchor your pinky.
Makes it hard to play more complex stuff.

If you don't know what either of these are just google it; at least now you know what to look out for, and can work to prevent these from becoming habits and really screwing you over basically.
#14
As someone pointed out, the internet has made it impossible to be self-taught practically. That being said, I've never had any lessons, but recently started playing with some friends after 2 years playing in my bedroom and I've noticed my playing has improved pretty rapidly, so it's become clear to me that exposure to other musicians is key, be that a teacher or just some of your mates.
#15
Lessons are expensive, but if you have the money, definitely take them. You can teach yourself just fine most of the time, though you will progress far fast, and better, if you have a teacher. I wish I could afford a teacher.
#16
im still begginer ive only played a year and abit myself but what i can say is ive learned quite a bit from the internet. But fairly recently found a realy good teacher and ive learned so much more in 3 lessons than i have so far from the internet. so id sugest finding a realy good teacher and you can ask them questions. internets good id say but first hand face to face experiance with sumone who knows what there doing is guna be more benefeicial id imagine in the long run.
#17
the internets is very specific about stuff i think but it doesnt realy tell you what to learn first or anything its specific lessons realy.
#18
It's really up to you, to decide what is best for you. I've had lessons and I've learned on my own. They each have their pro's and cons, neither is inherently better or worse than the other.... nobody can teach you anything, so at the end of the day what you learn, when you learn it and how you decide to apply it falls on your shoulders, and your shoulders alone. I prefer to mix and match, I like to talk to and study any musican I can. Because they all bring something diffrent to the table, and the only real way to understand music. Is for you to hear as many diffrent view points as possible and make the choices that you belive to be true.

If I could make a suggestion I would highly recommend checking out "the music lesson" by Victor Wooten. You can pick it up at barnes and noble for $10... it's not an instructional book, in the typical sense. He talks about how most people take an arse backwards approach to music.

He splits music into 10 equal elements notes, dynamics, phrasing, rhythm, space, articulation, technique, ect... each is basically a chapter. And then he asks a simple and honest question if all 10 are equal then why do we spend 95% of our time learning notes and notes alone... and why are notes the only thing people mention when they talk about music theory!? When in reality music theory is nothing more than "the study of music"... infact if you break music down the word "Mu" means mother and "Sic" refers to science which means knowlage, put them together and you get MU-SIC "the mother of all knowlage". Dig deep enough, and just about anything in life can be related to music in one way or another.

I am not a big reader... but I do have to say it's a pretty damn good read, definetly a little weird I wont lie, but it really digs into the philisophical/spiritual side of music rather than the technical/theretical aspects... but hey its just a diffrent view point, and one you probably wont hear anywhere else. You can take what you want from it and apply it to your music and life for that matter, or you can disregard all of it, the choice is up to you
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.
Last edited by TheMooseKnuckle at May 18, 2011,
#19
Quote by Kenjisan231
The word self-taught is used incorrectly if you ask me.

The internet is a treasure trove of lessons, and while you have no interaction with them, they are teaching you.

Of course I am not arguing that a teacher is of poor choice, rather there is benefit from one-on-one mentorship and online instruction as the internet offers a wide variety. The only problem i've ever seen with guitar lessons is the student hangs on to every word the instructor says and refuses to listen or seek out any new advice.
yea...
I think the 'self taught' tag isnt what it once was.

Ive been playing for 2 years now and have never had an lesson from a pro, but self taught? Ive used books, video lessons, youtube, websites, written lessons... I've printed almost every lesson from this site to read on the train then practice when I get home. This style of learning is perfect for me because I learn by doing. I just want the 5 minute how-to-do-this-properly then go practice practice practice.

My only regret about not taking lessons from a pro (I may yet at some point and would like too if I ever had the time) is someone to simply watch my playing and offer suggestions and corrections.

I also think a good teacher will push you out of your comfort zones which will make you a better player faster.

Just my experience in my two years.
he of tranquil mind
#20
i'm truly self-taught in that there was no internet available to me when I started out. (yea i'm that old)

My advice to TS is to get a good teacher if you can afford it (I could not unfortunately)

Learning proper techniques, and weeding out bad habits before they start, is more than enough reason to work with a mentor. You won't be kicking yourself 10 years from now.

The thing is... even with the internet guidance available, you can still form bad habits without even realizing it if you only practice by yourself. You can't always notice every little nuance that could lead to problems down the road. (A good teacher will notice and offer guidance)

Don't get me wrong I'm overall happy with my playing and successful enough to keep me content... but I have spent a LOT of time straightening out bad habits and bad technique - that I probably could have avoided if I had somebody advising me in my early years.

Most importantly, if you get a teacher - don't just settle for anybody... find somebody that comes highly recommended, and go watch them play live if you can. You should admire their own playing.
They will be your employee, tasked with a very important job... so have reasonable confidence that you have found the right person.
And if it's not going the way you want... don't be afraid to fire them and find a different teacher.
good luck

Edit: Just noticed you said "local music shop". I hate to say it because it's a generalization... but that is where many of the mediocre teachers are to be found... some of them fall into it because the store has nobody else to teach at the moment, so they grab the guitar salesman to teach the walk-in students.
All the best teachers I know are private. And as i mentioned above... I been around this a long time. for what its worth
Last edited by cringer at May 18, 2011,
#21
I'm self taught, and I learned 20 years ago so no YouTube or UG for me. However I'm a farily logical person and I can usually see the most sensible way to tackle a problem. I did also have a decent book, it was called "Rockschool" and I'm pretty sure there was a TV show linked to it - it laid things out in a pretty sensible order and so I kind of just followed that, and if I thought there was a better way I did that instead. In addition to that was a ton of guitar magazines and tab books. Nobody I knew played well enough to be much use so I pretty much had to sort myself out.

Not everybody thinks like that though, if you don't have the inclination, discipline or common sense then you'll fall flat on your arse! Irrespective of that, you benefit greatly from having somebody to point you in the right direction and answer questions when starting out.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#22
If you're logical, you can get away with teaching yourself but it's better to get a teacher who knows what they're doing so they can point you along your way.

A genius can find their own way but a genius can reap the maximum benefits in the least amount of time with good guidance.

Listening to the finer points of music is something that takes practice, you won't be able to hear everything that an experienced musician will. You'll eventually (I hope) be able to do that yourself but it can be difficult when you don't know what to listen for. A good teacher will have a keen ear for everything in the music and will be able to show you how to reach your goals.

If you can afford it, get a teacher. It doesn't matter if you're a clever guy or the biggest dumbass, a good teacher will speed up your learning process. Good teachers are flexible and good teachers will inspire you.

EDIT:

Be careful though, it's frustratingly difficult to find a guitar teacher who knows what they're doing (especially for electric guitar)
Last edited by XianXiuHong at May 19, 2011,
#23
Quote by steven seagull
I'm self taught, and I learned 20 years ago so no YouTube or UG for me. However I'm a farily logical person and I can usually see the most sensible way to tackle a problem. I did also have a decent book, it was called "Rockschool" and I'm pretty sure there was a TV show linked to it - it laid things out in a pretty sensible order and so I kind of just followed that, and if I thought there was a better way I did that instead. In addition to that was a ton of guitar magazines and tab books. Nobody I knew played well enough to be much use so I pretty much had to sort myself out.

Not everybody thinks like that though, if you don't have the inclination, discipline or common sense then you'll fall flat on your arse! Irrespective of that, you benefit greatly from having somebody to point you in the right direction and answer questions when starting out.


Im pretty much the same way.

Before there was youtube, and the internet, there was just sitting in your room all day and night trying to work things out for yourself.

If you were lucky enough to have a VHS tape of some concert where you could watch what the guy was doing, even better.

Guitar mags were like gold, and TAB books were good, but rarely to be trusted. There was only one way : you had to use your ears, and work hard.

Its great that we can now access loads of information in a second, but it also means we can now be tempted to spend more time searching for answers than working them out by ourselves, and this leads to less unique approaches to the guitar and how to play it.
#24
Quote by ZeroGlass
Its great that we can now access loads of information in a second, but it also means we can now be tempted to spend more time searching for answers than working them out by ourselves, and this leads to less unique approaches to the guitar and how to play it.



What do you mean by 'unique'?

Most of the 'great' guitarists from the past few decades were self taught and made some great music but I wouldn't say any of them had a 'unique' way of playing the guitar. Pioneers in their genre? Yes, but they definitely didn't deviate much (if at all) in terms of technique. They were simply guys who knew how to write a good tune. Moving through technical difficulties shouldn't affect how you write music, it should help you make what's in your head sound good or help you find it quicker.

Not an attack on you, I'm just curious as to what you mean by unique.
#25
Don't forget starting at a tab book intently for several minutes trying in vain to remember a tricky bit, then running home as fast as possible in case you forgot it.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#26
Quote by XianXiuHong
What do you mean by 'unique'?

Most of the 'great' guitarists from the past few decades were self taught and made some great music but I wouldn't say any of them had a 'unique' way of playing the guitar. Pioneers in their genre? Yes, but they definitely didn't deviate much (if at all) in terms of technique. They were simply guys who knew how to write a good tune. Moving through technical difficulties shouldn't affect how you write music, it should help you make what's in your head sound good or help you find it quicker.

Not an attack on you, I'm just curious as to what you mean by unique.



I mean in the sense of tackling problems and overcoming them, not so much the actual playing or overall technique, more of a mental approach.

For example my way of working out a solo, or piece of music might be totally different to the way you interpret it, and we could both come up with something different that sounds good and we can learn from.
#27
Quote by steven seagull
Don't forget starting at a tab book intently for several minutes trying in vain to remember a tricky bit, then running home as fast as possible in case you forgot it.


And then seeing them play it live in a totally different fingering and position to the dodgy tab book....
#28
Quote by ZeroGlass
And then seeing them play it live in a totally different fingering and position to the dodgy tab book....

Yeah, the Cherry Lane tab books were bad for that. I think a lot of the songs were transcribed by piano players, as a result you ended up with loads of perfectly correct notes playing in illogical places - I remember the intro the Hell's Bells being transcribed in a downright retarded way, in fact I'm pretty sure I read an interview where Angus was baffled as to why they'd made it so complicated when he just played it all around an E5 at the 7th fret

Again though, that's something you won't necessarily realise on your own, but something a decent teacher will pick up on quickly. I think sometimes the role of a teacher is misunderstood - I see people complaining that a teacher isn't "teaching them the right stuff" or they're "not learning what I want to learn". To me a teacher is supposed to do exactly that, teach you the stuff you DON'T want to learn - because that's the stuff that doesn't look exciting or glamourous enough for you to want to learn it off your own bat, and a teacher's job is to make you understand why those things are important.

You only have lessons for an hour a week at most, and the biggest mistake I've seen people make is only playing for their lessons. They get shown stuff in their lesson, get given some homework and only do that - they forget that the lessons are only their to help them learn to play the guitar, therefore along with the lessons they should be doing just that, playing their guitar! Teachers are supposed to kick you up the arse and make you do the dirty work you don't want to do - a good teacher is an enabler, they'll teach you to fish rather than spoonfeed you pilchards.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#29
What can a teacher tell you that is not already available on the internet?
Unless you think you would have trouble forcing yourself to practice, I don't see much sense in it unless the tutoring is funded by your school. I had a teacher originally, but this was when I was in primary school and had little interest in practicing with a 1 hour lesson per week. After learning simple chords I quit having a tutor, once you begin to enjoy learning new songs, I find the interest to develop new techniques is much more of an appeal than a burden as it feels when you're starting up.

Buy a beginners book would be the easiest thing to do. They go over techniques etc as well as provide songs relative to the difficulty of the techniques you are learning. The book I was given did a great job, I'm not 100% sure but I believe it was this one:

http://www.printmusiconline.com/images/items/1903.jpg

Sells for around £9.

EDIT: Also you're not going to get far learning the generic beginner songs. Stick to acoustic guitar to start with and learn the melodies to classical pieces as found in that book, it will do you huge favours once you switch to electric. If you're going to learn random songs outside of your own training routine, practice ones that make you learn new techniques.
Last edited by Nemm at May 19, 2011,
#30
A good teacher will make learning a lot more fun, and a lot easier. Ask around to see if anyone can recommend a good teacher, get a lesson or two and see if you click with them and if you do that's definitely the best option.
#31
Quote by Nemm
What can a teacher tell you that is not already available on the internet?
Unless you think you would have trouble forcing yourself to practice, I don't see much sense in it unless the tutoring is funded by your school. I had a teacher originally, but this was when I was in primary school and had little interest in practicing with a 1 hour lesson per week. After learning simple chords I quit having a tutor, once you begin to enjoy learning new songs, I find the interest to develop new techniques is much more of an appeal than a burden as it feels when you're starting up.

Buy a beginners book would be the easiest thing to do. They go over techniques etc as well as provide songs relative to the difficulty of the techniques you are learning. The book I was given did a great job, I'm not 100% sure but I believe it was this one:

http://www.printmusiconline.com/images/items/1903.jpg

Sells for around £9.

EDIT: Also you're not going to get far learning the generic beginner songs. Stick to acoustic guitar to start with and learn the melodies to classical pieces as found in that book, it will do you huge favours once you switch to electric. If you're going to learn random songs outside of your own training routine, practice ones that make you learn new techniques.



You didn't read this thread did you?

There are several things a teacher can teach you that the internet can't or that the internet isn't good at explaining.

The internet is a great tool because it's so accessible but because it's so accessible is why so much information on it is full of crap. What's even worse is those 'beginner' books. You can't learn how to build your foundations as a player properly from photos or paragraphs, learning how to play isn't like reading the instructions to a piece of Ikea furniture.

Honestly? There are so many 'beginner books' out there that teach different things and majority of them leave students with bad habits. If I were to tell someone to get a beginner book, I would at least have them work on it with a good teacher so the teacher can take the best bits out of that book and leave out the bad bits with reasons to what they're doing so that person may teach the 'correct' way later on.

The electric guitar books aren't so bad but they do skip over many things. For classical guitar, I dare say all of the instructional books are full of crap. Pumping Nylon is a good library for exercises and some practice philosophies but the guides to position and nail shape leave much to be desired.
#32
Quote by XianXiuHong
You didn't read this thread did you?

There are several things a teacher can teach you that the internet can't or that the internet isn't good at explaining.

The internet is a great tool because it's so accessible but because it's so accessible is why so much information on it is full of crap. What's even worse is those 'beginner' books. You can't learn how to build your foundations as a player properly from photos or paragraphs, learning how to play isn't like reading the instructions to a piece of Ikea furniture.

Honestly? There are so many 'beginner books' out there that teach different things and majority of them leave students with bad habits. If I were to tell someone to get a beginner book, I would at least have them work on it with a good teacher so the teacher can take the best bits out of that book and leave out the bad bits with reasons to what they're doing so that person may teach the 'correct' way later on.

The electric guitar books aren't so bad but they do skip over many things. For classical guitar, I dare say all of the instructional books are full of crap. Pumping Nylon is a good library for exercises and some practice philosophies but the guides to position and nail shape leave much to be desired.


Sorry to disappoint but yes, I did read.
I guess some people just have a different opinion than yourself. Crazy stuff.
#34
Quote by Nemm
What can a teacher tell you that is not already available on the internet?

That you're doing something right....or indeed wrong.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com