#1
what pentatonic scales do blues-guitarists typically play in? I got a dvd which claims to teach you blues guitar but it doesnt get further than first and second position pentatonics. Is this because generally those are being used for blues?
#2
dont think of it as multiple scales first of all.

there is 1 minor pentatonic scale that you use all over the neck


also you shouldnt be thinking of them as positions. scales are just sets of intervals
#3
Personally I think blues scales would be preferable to pentatonics for blues guitarists, just sayin', but I'm guessing it would be minor pentatonics in whatever key they're playing in if they did use pentatonics. It doesn't matter at all what position is being used, as the above post says, there's one scale all over the fretboard, positions just divide it up.

Blues scales tend to be best for blues, (It's all in the name), especially for soloing.
Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at May 17, 2011,
#4
I don't think that means what you think it means. Pentatonic scales are simply 5 note scales. they can be played anywhere, but you'll want to consider what key you are in when playing. for example, you would play an Am pentatonic over a 12 bar blues in A (A-D-E). you could also play an A major pentatonic (F#m pentatonic), to get a different sound.

also, if you were able to somehow absorb all that, adding a flat 5 to the scale will change a minor pentatonic into a 'blues' scale.
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#7
ok clear thanks

now another question. When playing over A major the sixth degree would be the relative minor (f#m) but lets say i start playing Bminor with the emphasis on the A, would i play dorian mode? If thats the case,, its actually pretty easy to do and i suppose i understand modes.
#8
Quote by whatsmyusername
ok clear thanks

now another question. When playing over A major the sixth degree would be the relative minor (f#m) but lets say i start playing Bminor with the emphasis on the A, would i play dorian mode? If thats the case,, its actually pretty easy to do and i suppose i understand modes.


Nope. In the key of A major you will always be playing the A major scale, and would never be playing modes.
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#9
Quote by AlanHB
Nope. In the key of A major you will always be playing the A major scale, and would never be playing modes.

...just to add, you won't ever be "playing the relative minor" either.
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