#1
So lately I have been trying to make my way out of the bedroom and into the world of blues/funk/jazz jams. This opened my eyes to a weakness in my playing aside from being nervous. Rhythm guitar. Now while I can hold down the chords to a song just fine, the rhythm section of these house bands are on POINT. The improvisation within the rhythm section to me is almost more important than the actual soloing. The small subtleties of rhythm improvisation are awesome and can definitely change the entire feel of the song. Can anybody recommend me any good rhythm guitarists to check out? Any good Youtube videos or players? Some advice would also help. I would really like to get my rhythm improv up to par. Mainly interested in solid funk..soul..and R&B rhythm. Blues would alright as well. Thanks
#3
Check out Melvin Sparks, leo nocentelli (the meters), Brian Stoltz (funky Meters,PBS), The New Mastersounds, Soulive, Lettuce, Grant Green, James Brown. Check out Antoine Dufour and Andy Mckee, they have an incredible sense of rhythm.
#4
Quote by Musicrules,man
blues doesn't have rythym guitarist hardly ever... thats why every blues bassist is incredible.

You have absolutely what you are talking about.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#5
Quote by rockingamer2
You have absolutely what you are talking about.

I think I might agree with you but your statement doesn't make sense, at least not in english. I'm assuming you mean "You have absolutely no idea what you are talking about"

Eiterh way yeah blues has plenty of rhythm. I've played rythm guitar for several blues guitarists.

anyways TS using a metronome will really help you with rhythm.

try some basic things like choosing a simple chord progression (I IV V will work) and trying these rhythms.

one two three four

one and two and three and four and

one trip let two trip let three trip let four trip let

now try them again with muted chords
after that try to mix up the different counts(try both muted chords and a chord progression) like

one and two three trip let four

okay now that that stuff is over listen to these types of songs you want to learn, pay specific attention to the rhythm. most of these styles are defined pretty hard by rhythm and the place ment of muted chords.


I hope this helped.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#6
Quote by krypticguitar87
I think I might agree with you but your statement doesn't make sense, at least not in english. I'm assuming you mean "You have absolutely no idea what you are talking about"

Whoops.

It's kinda funny. There was a thread in the Pit about posting our internet ticks/weird stuff we do, and I posted that I often forget the a word or two, usually because I edit something and forget to read it over again.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#7
Rhythm guitar can be a fun challenge when first getting used to it. Using a metronome and experimenting with different types of rhythm can be really helpful. One of the main ideas of rhythm is to get the groove into your system, so that you can really feel the rhythm down to your bones.

Being tight with rhythm is all about getting the groove and staying in the groove, and usually when people improvise rhythm, they syncopate it or sudbivide it, so you should look up some syncopated rhythms and you will know what I'm talking about.. Here's something that is pretty interesting about rhythm in music http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTQ1A7YT1pQ

Start paying more attention to rhythm in songs that you listen to, definitely. Become aware of it. Maybe learn how to drum, or learn some metal songs with a gallop rhythm, because they hit every 16th note and certain 16th notes are accented or different notes. It is constantly subdividing the beat into four pieces and if you can keep track of that in your mind, it becomes a little bit easier to keep up with other rhythm players. think of metal, it has a lot of really tight rhythm playing.

So, if you can get the hang of playing tight sixteenth notes and triplets, and syncopated rhythms and really get the 'groove' deeply embedded in your system, then rhythm will become easier. Blues is also a great rhythmic music, and you could learn 'Mary had a Little Lamb' by Stevie Ray Vaughn to help you get really good blues rhythm down. Happy practicing!
"Things seem pretty crummy, but if they could carry us away with them, we'd die of poetry. In a way, that wouldn't be bad." -Louis-Ferdinand Celine
Last edited by Marcus_Wiesner at May 18, 2011,
#9
Quote by jrenkert
best rhythm guitarist ever...Jimi Hendrix


Yea, he was really good. It's because he had the groove down to his bones for sure. That's really the most important part. Most of Jimi's music was based on blues, so like I said, if you can get the hang of blues rhythm, you will be so much closer to being a good rhythm player :P
"Things seem pretty crummy, but if they could carry us away with them, we'd die of poetry. In a way, that wouldn't be bad." -Louis-Ferdinand Celine
#10
Now while I can hold down the chords to a song just fine, the rhythm section of these house bands are on POINT. The improvisation within the rhythm section to me is almost more important than the actual soloing. The small subtleties of rhythm improvisation are awesome and can definitely change the entire feel of the song. Can anybody recommend me any good rhythm guitarists to check out? Any good Youtube videos or players? Some advice would also help. I would really like to get my rhythm improv up to par. Mainly interested in solid funk..soul..and R&B rhythm. Blues would alright as well. Thanks


study some james brown..his band could teach a metronome how to keep time..listen to some of the guitar parts...simple chords..mostly dominates 7 9's .. but they punch..the accents are always there..never miss..

doing some basic exercises like Bmi7 Bmi6 vamps for 32 bars and move the accent around so it comes in on the upbeat or a accented eight note..which brown used alot..

listen to a cut by billy joel (trust me on this) EZ money...it rocks...lots of movement and tempo changes...if you can get the chart for it do so..

there is also a super cut by van morrison called "blue money" that has an excellent feel to it...

play well

wolf
#11
Jamiroquoi! Those bastards can ****ing GROOVE!!!!!!!!
Quote by jpnyc
You are what they call a “rhythm guitarist”. While it's not as glamorous as playing lead you can still get laid. Especially if you can sing and play.




Beer is the solutions to the world's problems.

#13
Quote by rockingamer2
Whoops.

It's kinda funny. There was a thread in the Pit about posting our internet ticks/weird stuff we do, and I posted that I often forget the a word or two, usually because I edit something and forget to read it over again.

Haha, it's funny cause I filled in the blanks myself when I read it the first time...weird.

Anyway I found this video a couple of days ago and it's a great little method for improving chord vocabulary. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSfzKflDoLI&feature=feedlik
#14
Thanks. A lot of this stuff is great. I like the Jamiroquoi group a bit. James Brown is great for practicing, and some Earth Wind & Fire songs are down right disgusting. That song Running by EWF is one funky groove. As far as grooving with other musicians I suppose that will just come with practice.
#15
If you want to check out a quick little lesson to improve your Rhythm this is it. It's a clip from Anthony Wellington and Victor Wootens "Groove Workshop". He has a class identify and play any of the 16 sub divisions of a measure. I've posted this link a dozen times and I'll post it another dozen because it's that damn good!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Sw_trDFJw8&feature=related

If you want to hear a true master of the groove... check out James Jamerson. He was the house bassist for Motown. He could hold down a rock solid groove with imaculate timing, but at the exact same time he would play a counter melody to the singer. He is the only musican I have ever studied who can anchor an entire band while palying a counter-melody at the exact same time


If your intrested here are a few of his more well known basslines.

For once in my life - Stevie Wonder
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bAliqnJMGI

Dear Darling - Jackson 5
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ND-iW51idC0

I'm gonna make you love me - Temps/Suprems
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vI844RAJo58

Whats going on - Marvin Gaye
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9KC7uhMY9s
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.
Last edited by TheMooseKnuckle at May 20, 2011,
#16
Wow. Mooseknuckle. That Anthony Wellington and Victor Wooten lesson was AWESOME! Really broke down feel and groove to the basics. Those 16th notes felt awkward at first, but with practice I'm sure little things like that make a huge difference when grooving with others. Thanks a lot.
#17
Quote by SEANannigans
So lately I have been trying to make my way out of the bedroom and into the world of blues/funk/jazz jams. This opened my eyes to a weakness in my playing aside from being nervous. Rhythm guitar. Now while I can hold down the chords to a song just fine, the rhythm section of these house bands are on POINT. The improvisation within the rhythm section to me is almost more important than the actual soloing. The small subtleties of rhythm improvisation are awesome and can definitely change the entire feel of the song. Can anybody recommend me any good rhythm guitarists to check out? Any good Youtube videos or players? Some advice would also help. I would really like to get my rhythm improv up to par. Mainly interested in solid funk..soul..and R&B rhythm. Blues would alright as well. Thanks



Matt "Guitar" Murphy, Jimmy Nolen, "Catfish" Collins (Bootsy's brother), Grant Greene, Herb Ellis,

Wow .. tons of others


IMO rhythm guitar is far far far more important than lead guitar -- it was Jimi Hendrix's years of playing rhythm in other people's bands that put him in a place to completely revolutionize rock guitar. Every good lead player can play rhythm and lock with the rest of the band. And, like you are indicating -- in R&B, Soul, Funk and other genres that use percussive syncopation (Latin & Caribbean music) the band has to be TIGHT -- look at P Funk, Earth, Wind and Fire, The Isley Brothers, James Brown's various bands, Isaac Hayes' bands (and the Stax house band in particular), Stevie Wonder's bands (sometimes him on multiple instruments!), Tito Peunte's bands, Bob Marley and the Wailers, the Roots.

There is a serious difference between just plucking a bunch of notes and playing a solo -- we all know that -- though the average kid who just a got a guitar is struggling with the idea. No one who goes to play with a tight band maintains any illusion about the importance of solid rhythm. So, IMO, rhythm playing is often the more mature approach to guitar -- laying back and letting a singer or soloist have the spotlight while keeping a groove happening requires not only discipline and chops, but a proper attitude and experience.
#18
Quote by SEANannigans
Thanks. A lot of this stuff is great. I like the Jamiroquoi group a bit. James Brown is great for practicing, and some Earth Wind & Fire songs are down right disgusting. That song Running by EWF is one funky groove. As far as grooving with other musicians I suppose that will just come with practice.



That's been my experience.

Sitting at home playing with records, I thought I knew a few things. The first time I had a rehearsal with my own band, I quickly realized I was clueless -- I could NOT lock with the drummer and bassist -- I was so embarrassed! I went and got a metronome and worked on it night and day until I could. Then we would rehearse for hours and hours -- no solos, no showing off -- just staying in time together and getting tight -- we know that when we were ready to gig, people would know that we sounded tight or they would not like us.

That was many years ago and I am really glad for the humbling experience.