#1
I have been having trouble lately with my home recordings and I think a lot of it has to do with my, well, I don't actually know what it is, that's why I came here.

When I am playing along to my drum tracks, my guitar tone from the amp sounds great and it's exactly where I want it to be. Once I get to recording though, the low strings sound a little, fuzzy? sloppy?, I can't really describe it... I don't have audio examples so I know I am kinda shooting in the dark here but do you think maybe it's the speakers? Mic position?

I was told once to set all EQ's on your amp to 12 o'clock and EQ it in the post-pro. Is this true?

I need help please...
#2
What you REALLY need is a multieffects pedal, a mixer, and digital interface with two inputs.
#4
Hmm when I record with pro tools I lay down many tracks and just listen to each one the fuzz may be coming from the computer it self if your doing direct line in or something along those lines if your using a mic maybe mess with eq setting and look into some filters . Sometimes my reverb messes with my mic .Doing all effects after the recording is great and gives you more control but can be harder if your new at it. Im not a recording pro but thought it might help you out ! Good luck man.
#5
Try turning down your volume when you record and then boost some of the frequencies you want to hear more when you do post effects. Sorry for double post just thought of another way to try it.
#6
Hmm when I record with pro tools I lay down many tracks and just listen to each one the fuzz may be coming from the computer it self if your doing direct line in or something along those lines if your using a mic maybe mess with eq setting and look into some filters . Sometimes my reverb messes with my mic .Doing all effects after the recording is great and gives you more control but can be harder if your new at it. Im not a recording pro but thought it might help you out ! Good luck man.


Only thing I record direct is my keyboard. I have changed the positioning of my mic a lot and EQ'd a lot as well.

Hmm... actually just thought of something... my amp has two speakers, not one.... instead of putting one in the middle should I record two mics in stereo on each speaker? Didn't even think of that....
#7
Turn your gain down 30-40% from your 'live' setting. Also monitor the mic input and adjust the mic until you get a tone you like. Setting all dials to noon is just the start of finding a recording tone; it's best to get the sound you want as close to the source as possible to minimize the processing you have to do. Monitoring your mic input is key because your ears do not hear the amp the same way a microphone does. You might not think a tone sounds good in your room, but it may sound phenomenal once it's recorded. Another big factor is the type of mic you're using. What type of amp and what microphone are you using?
#8
What amp you trying to mic? What mic are you using? All important things we need to know
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#11
Honestly, you're going to need a new amp :p
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#12
Quote by malmsteensolo
What you REALLY need is a multieffects pedal, a mixer, and digital interface with two inputs.

Please don't try to help with this sort of thing again, thanks


Anyway, pretty much been covered now by lockwolf and Odirunn, but to add to that I suggest you raise your amp off the floor, and angle it up slightly... reduces floor-borne vibrations that can really screw with your tone, and if you angle it up you will hear a lot closer to what the mic hears - whenever I do live sound stuff and someone has a sound too bad to work with (note: Line 6 Spiders, Marshall Mode 4/MG/AVT etc.) I ask them to kneel down and EQ with the speakers at head height, and they usually thank me afterwards (apart from the ones who are certain it was a dodgy lead, or think I'm playing with them through the PA... yeah, some people should just be bedroom guitarists and no more).
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#13
Anyway, pretty much been covered now by lockwolf and Odirunn, but to add to that I suggest you raise your amp off the floor, and angle it up slightly... reduces floor-borne vibrations that can really screw with your tone, and if you angle it up you will hear a lot closer to what the mic hears - whenever I do live sound stuff and someone has a sound too bad to work with (note: Line 6 Spiders, Marshall Mode 4/MG/AVT etc.) I ask them to kneel down and EQ with the speakers at head height, and they usually thank me afterwards (apart from the ones who are certain it was a dodgy lead, or think I'm playing with them through the PA... yeah, some people should just be bedroom guitarists and no more).


I don't need a new amp. Not yet anyway. This is one of the more expensive Crates (I think anyway... cost me 800) and I just like the sound of it better than anything I've played.

Anyway, my amp is raised off the floor. I would say that the speakers sit just below the level of my chest. I have noticed a drastic difference in sound when I raised it off of the floor (because I live on the second story above our den). You think instead of micing one speaker would be better than one mic on each or in the middle? Should try that... Thanks everyone.
#14
Quote by Weaponxclaws
I don't need a new amp. Not yet anyway. This is one of the more expensive Crates (I think anyway... cost me 800) and I just like the sound of it better than anything I've played.

Spending a lot on something doesn't make it good. You can spend $800 on an MG and that doesn't make it good. Just sayin'