#1
ive been thinking i shoud get in to a style instead of playing any old stuff but shoud i do jazz or blues can i have some pros and cons or your oppinions please?
#3
Personally Blues > Jazz
I just love the whole feel to blues, real fun to play as well!

But like Banana Wedgie said, why not learn to play both? The more styles you learn the better!
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#4
I'm mainly a blues guy, but most of what I work on in my studies is Jazz. Jazz really lends itself to blues very well. Learn both and combine them. It's what the best blues guys did.
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#5
There is some overlap. The best blues players can utilize jazz concepts into their playing and it makes it very interesting. A lot of jazz players will work blues into what they do as well.

If you can pick up jazz and learn to play it competently you can play blues. Not so much the other way around.
Last edited by al112987 at May 19, 2011,
#6
If you can play jazz, you can play blues.
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#7
You've got to be able to play the blues to play Jazz...
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#8
The best way is to jazz up your blues!
The fact is, that not many blues players can play jazz, but many jazz players are very good in blues imo
#10
go with jazz.
pros: represents a progressive moment in cultural production
cons: you will have to practice your ass off
#11
"blues" is a form of "jazz" you nabs.
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#12
Quote by gregs1020
"blues" is a form of "jazz" you nabs.


Not true. As best as music historians can tell, blues and jazz both formed at roughly the same time in 2 seperate areas in the south. Are there similarities? Yes, but there are similarities between blues and reggae too, without one being a form of the other.

I'm sure that very early on, some people moved between the two styles and mixed them up a little, but they are still two seperate genres of music. Plus, blues has always been a very guitar (or diddley bow!) oriented music, but when jazz first started out, there wasn't that much guitar involved because the acoustics at the time couldn't compete volume wise with the brass and drums in jazz bands. It wasn't until the invention of the resonator that guitars started being noticed in jazz, and even then, blues artists grabbed them and started playing them even more.

It wasn't really until a little later on with the advent of the electric guitar that you got some jazz guitarists playing solos and whatnot, once again, because of the volume problem.

Anyway, to get back on target, I play blues and incorporate jazz. Check out Derek Trucks Band! He does some awesome blues playing that incorporates all sorts of jazz. The tune "For My Brother" is a sweet modal jazz jam.
"You ever dance with the devil in the pale moonlight?"
#13
As kaos says. Maybe some distant common roots.... Blues grew out of field hollers and improvised musical traditions.
Some historians confine the birth of "jazz" to a tiny nightclub district in turn-of-the-century New Orleans....
Anyway, contemporary jazz is a big tent. Dozens of different styles and flavors, ranging from stuff that's verging on pop to really, really far out experimental stuff.

Blues is overall more traditional and simple, but there's plenty of outside stuff going on and it too is extremely diverse.
I would recommend listening to a lot of both and see what turns you on. Don't limit yourself; in blues you've got everything from very early traditional acoustic "rural" blues to modern, big-band, electric stuff.