#1
My band has a singer who's 20 and it's her first time singing lead for a band. Naturally, there's been some work to do, but she sounds fine live. In the studio however it is hard to get her to sing with emotion at climax parts of the songs. I've had this problem with every singer I've worked with thus far. Does anyone have any tips?
#3
Give her some lyrics and say it's a new song you just wrote. Have the lyrics be an impassioned plea to some unnamed person to stop some unnamed act. Then make her sing it over and over while you torture a helpless panda until her desperate, tearful pleas are passionate enough to make you stop.


In other words, sorry, I don't have any real tips.


Don't actually do the panda thing.
#4
The only thing I can think of is get her to write her own lyrics, about something she has strong emotions for.
Sorry I can't be any more helpful =/
#5
tell her to imagine a situation where she has felt a strong sense of emotion such as a break up or something and have her focus on that while singing thats what i do with guitar it should work with vocals to
#6
If she can sing with emotion live but not in the studio, make her record vocals infront of an audience, some famous singers only record vocals infront of people to make sure they put everything into it
#7
Quote by stevosmusic1
tell her to imagine a situation where she has felt a strong sense of emotion such as a break up or something and have her focus on that while singing thats what i do with guitar it should work with vocals to

this

on the rare chance that i sing and record i always try to do this. depending on the vibe im going for i might have to psyche myself into one of any various moods. i remember recording vocals one time and having my friend slap me hard in the face repeatedly to piss me off. it worked
#8
it may also be that she is just not comfortable with her voice but can really get into it live. This is the plaque of all new (and alot of professional) singers. Its just hard to grab that same "live" feeling when you are staring into a mic in a near soundless studio booth. Its draining until you get used to it.

A guitar solo, once constructed, is merely hitting the correct notes (though yes some feeling can be expressed to how you vibrato and move along the strings) while singing requires both technical skill and the ability to couple that with emotions. Its just not easy at all in the beginning.

tip? be patient. the more you are critical and push the worse I gaurantee she becomes. Let her come into her own in her time and it will be fine.
Last edited by merriman44 at May 20, 2011,
#9
If you've had this problem with every singer so far, then not meaning to sound nasty but maybe it's you who has the problem? Maybe what you think is an acceptable use of emotion isn't that to her, also why don't you sing yourself if you find flaws with everyone else?
#10
Believe me, I've wondered that, but it's never been me who's pointed it out. It was always someone else who pointed it out to me, but maybe I am just listening to irrational people. That's entirely possible.
#11
Quote by merriman44
it may also be that she is just not comfortable with her voice but can really get into it live. This is the plaque of all new (and alot of professional) singers. Its just hard to grab that same "live" feeling when you are staring into a mic in a near soundless studio booth. Its draining until you get used to it.

A guitar solo, once constructed, is merely hitting the correct notes (though yes some feeling can be expressed to how you vibrato and move along the strings) while singing requires both technical skill and the ability to couple that with emotions. Its just not easy at all in the beginning.

tip? be patient. the more you are critical and push the worse I gaurantee she becomes. Let her come into her own in her time and it will be fine.


This seems like the most plausible answer. I needed to hear it from someone else.