#1
Hey, so I am going to be in my school's Jazz Band starting next year (woo!) but I thought it'd be smart to practice sight-reading and was wondering what songs you guys would recommend that are good for sight-reading (I'll use the guitar pro file and play along to that). I'm not exactly the best at sight-reading (or even good at it, hence the need for practice) so it'd be cool if the songs were on the easier side....Thanks!
#2
Learn to read chords. You'll be using chord symbols to make up bass lines ALOT. I can't really recommend anything though for the type of bass stuff you'll be playing in a jazz band. I don't think there are many swing or latin songs on UG.
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#3
Your best bet is to buy a jazz Fake book. They have lead sheets with the melodies. That's essentially what you'll be seeing in college
#4
Yea, you'd probably be best off with a book of some kind.

Although on UG I found

Frank Sinatra - New York, New York
Duke Ellington stuff

Although there is no key signature put in these, so there are a bunch of accidentals everywhere. And, at least in TuxGuitar, I had to change the clef in the bass notation to bass clef.

Might find some stuff here - They're PDF files, so pull out the old metronome or play along with the recordings given.
http://www.free-scores.com/free-sheet-music.php?CATEGORIE=20&genre=Jazz&searchexact=&ordrepar=&divers=&search=&niveau=&imageField.x=78&imageField.y=8


Play around with this page too, there's some easy stuff here (avoid the Victor Wooten ones), and you can find recordings on YouTube and such for a lot of them probably.
http://www.lucaspickford.com/transbass.htm
Quote by THEdevilYOUknow
No, it's plain science, women are evil

Quote by MB343
Women = time x money
time = money
Money = √evil
women = √evil x √evil
women = evil
Last edited by THEdevilYOUknow at May 19, 2011,
#5
from what I heard, jazz bands in high school have prewritten lines with or without changes. I played a gig last week and next door a small big band was playing (octet or nonet). scanned the bass charts. sure enough, all had prewritten lines. half or less had actual changes written in. although some of them were well known standards anyone should already know, some were not. so be prepared for everything.

I'd say practice both. there's an excellent series called Walking in the Footsteps of ... with editions on Sam Jones, Doug Watkins and Paul Chambers. get one (or all) and practice sight-reading the lines. they also have chord changes, so try improving a line based on the changes. two birds; one stone.
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Last edited by primusfan at May 19, 2011,
#6
Quote by primusfan
from what I heard, jazz bands in high school have prewritten lines with or without changes. I played a gig last week and next door a small big band was playing (octet or nonet). scanned the bass charts. sure enough, all had prewritten lines. half or less had actual changes written in. although some of them were well known standards anyone should already know, some were not. so be prepared for everything.

I'd say practice both. there's an excellent series called Walking in the Footsteps of ... with editions on Sam Jones, Doug Watkins and Paul Chambers. get one (or all) and practice sight-reading the lines. they also have chord changes, so try improving a line based on the changes. two birds; one stone.


Good advice...
Can't beat studying the greats. I'll add the Aebersold play-a-long series; specifically the recordings with Ron Carter, where you can get the transcribed bass line as well.
You'll need to bone up on your "note" sight reading, as the charts will probably be (as mentioned) written in notation. Big Band charts are written this way, and perhaps beginner small jazz groups. Reason being I guess... you haven't gotten to the place where you can work off changes.
Work on all of it. And don't forget, listen.