#1
Hey guys I've got this old classical guitar that we have no clue to what it is, but there's a story behind it that makes us think it's valuable, could you help us identify it? The guitar was given to my great grandmother from one of her friends, he had had it for a long time and gave it to her in the late 70s. Well before he gave it to her, he went and had new strings put on it at a local guitar shop, the man working on it there said that he'd give him any guitar he wanted in the store for it, he turned down the offer and gave it to my great grandmother. Later my great grandmother gave it to my mom who was around 9 the time. When my mom got it she pulled off the sticker from inside of it so the name brand that was on it is now gone, we've had it all these years and don't know what it is. It has no name on the neck and has pearl inlays around the hole. We contacted martin (because we thought it was a martin) and they said it didn't look like anything they've made, and we also contacted gibson and fender without a reply. Could you help us identify this guitar? I've got the pictures of it here: http://s1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb465/JakePlaysGuitar97/
Thanks guys
Last edited by JakePlaysGuitar at May 19, 2011,
#2
Oh lord...please don't tell me I see Steel strings on a classical...I also noticed the neck bowing in a side shot. You may want to switch those out for some nylons soon.

As for the brand, the headstock is giving me a Taylor vibe...not to mention the stylings of the guitar. Check them out and see.
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#3
firstly, your mum is a f'king idiot for pulling the sticker off. as it would have had the make, model number, serial number etc on it. resale value will be next to nothing without it i thing, simply because even if you find out what it is, you have no way of proving it.

secondly, it looks rather beat up. but i can imagine that comes with age

and lastly, would love to be able to help you out, but i can't. the best thing i can think about is simply get a list of all guitar manufacturers and email them pictures and ask if they recognise it. not just the obvious ones like martin and taylor.
Belief is a beautiful armour but makes for the heaviest sword.
#4
Quote by RockinSince1993
Oh lord...please don't tell me I see Steel strings on a classical...I also noticed the neck bowing in a side shot. You may want to switch those out for some nylons soon.

As for the brand, the headstock is giving me a Taylor vibe...not to mention the stylings of the guitar. Check them out and see.

I definately am going to, my dad fixed it up for my moms birthday and didn't know much about guitars then, so he told this guy to put steel strings on it, he didn't think much of it but the strings are hard to push down because of it, I've been playing for a couple of years and it's still difficult to me. I'll check out taylor and see what I can find, and yes it wasn't a smart decision pulling off the sticker, but she was very young when she pulled it off. I wish she didn't and she does to.
#5
hahaha I won't be much help here, but don't let your mom read this thread. It will probably make her feel really bad. No use cryin over spilled milk.

Looks like a solid top atleast. Fix it up, put a nice set of nylons on there and rock it. Tell people its an old martin from the 50's. No name, no sticker, who's gunna know?
#6
Quote by mkocian17
hahaha I won't be much help here, but don't let your mom read this thread. It will probably make her feel really bad. No use cryin over spilled milk.

Looks like a solid top atleast. Fix it up, put a nice set of nylons on there and rock it. Tell people its an old martin from the 50's. No name, no sticker, who's gunna know?

haha no she's fine, she's always making jokes about pulling out the sticker, and true that man it sounds great, best sounding acoustic I've ever played, just need to replace the strings, and yeah no one really can identify it, I'd love to know but I'm afraid it's impossible unless I get it looked at by an expert.
#7
Quote by JakePlaysGuitar
I'm afraid it's impossible unless I get it looked at by an expert.



Antiques road show! lol
#9
If the neck's still bowed after you change to nylons, take it to a local luthier. Some people say that a bowed classical neck is a goner, but it's not. Using steam (the same way they bend the sides of guitars!) a classical neck can be straightened. If the guitar really sounds as good as you say, then it's more than worth it.
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#10
That's an odd instrument. The machine heads have the small-diameter steel pegs you'd expect for a steel string, but the bridge shouts "classical". The bridge also appears to be screwed on (that's what the mother-of-pearl dots are covering), which is usually the mark of a cheap guitar, and also that one-piece "self" bridge without a separate saddle.
However, all that inlay work seems to indicate a nicer instrument.
From the style and general appearance I would guess it's European, possibly German.
Pity the label got tossed.
#11
Quote by Bikewer
That's an odd instrument. The machine heads have the small-diameter steel pegs you'd expect for a steel string, but the bridge shouts "classical". The bridge also appears to be screwed on (that's what the mother-of-pearl dots are covering), which is usually the mark of a cheap guitar, and also that one-piece "self" bridge without a separate saddle.
However, all that inlay work seems to indicate a nicer instrument.
From the style and general appearance I would guess it's European, possibly German.
Pity the label got tossed.

hmm that's interesting, and yeah it would've been nice if the label was still in it.