#1
I would like to know what scale this is, as I'm sure that someone else has thought of it. It certainly sounds neat, as it's kind of major/minor/diminished sounding all at the same time. I think it's cool because the tonic chord of the scale is major, and the second can be either major or minor, which just makes for some interesting tonal shifts.

Anyways here are some examples:

C, Db/C#, E, F, G, Ab/G#, Bb/A#, C (Sometimes I use a B natural because it works too).

E, F, G#/Ab, A, B, C, D, E

So the intervals are:

The tonic, Half-step, Minor Third, Half-step, Whole-step, Half-Step, Whole-step, and one more Whole-step completes the octave.

The scale itself sounds very Middle Eastern/Arabic in a way, and I really like it. Has anyone any clue to what its 'official' name is?
I've decided that my signature is terrible. I'm open to suggestions.


Click me, or I'll die.


# Un-nominated in UG Top 100,
#2
With a b7, it's Phrygian Dominant (which is a mode of Harmonic Minor). If you raise it to a natural 7, you have Double Harmonic Major.

1 b2 3 4 5 b6 b7 - Phrygian Dominant

1 b2 3 4 5 b6 7 - Double Harmonic Major
#4
Quote by Bushinarin
Thank you so much! Do you know where it's been used at all?


um, everywhere really.... like seriously, everywhere.

when your writing it the correct way to do it is to represent each letter name once, although that's just presentation, but it should help you see what scale it is easier anyway.
#8
Also see After Forever(RIP)'s "Follow in the Cry", I've seen the scale a few times but only that song comes to mind.
#9
Quote by Bushinarin


Anyways here are some examples:

C, Db/C#, E, F, G, Ab/G#, Bb/A#, C (Sometimes I use a B natural because it works too).

E, F, G#/Ab, A, B, C, D, E

Just thought I'd point out that the first scale should be written all in flats and the second in sharps.
(Each letter should only be used once) so they would be:
C Db E F G Ab Bb
E F G# A B C D

Other than that, what everyone else said
#10
Quote by Puppet_616
Just thought I'd point out that the first scale should be written all in flats and the second in sharps.
(Each letter should only be used once) so they would be:
C Db E F G Ab Bb
E F G# A B C D

Other than that, what everyone else said


I knew that, but I wanted the extra clarity because I wasn't certain how readily recognizable the scale would be.
I've decided that my signature is terrible. I'm open to suggestions.


Click me, or I'll die.


# Un-nominated in UG Top 100,
#11
Quote by Bushinarin
I knew that, but I wanted the extra clarity because I wasn't certain how readily recognizable the scale would be.


Fair play, didn't realise you already knew that
#12
I have two pretty full blown lessons regarding the Phrygian Dominant Scale...they'll show you a ton of ways to slice this scale up and get all kind of sounds out of it.

D Phrygian Dominant (includes audio and tab) using a strumming technique to accompany yourself similar to the way the sympathetic string do on a sitar: http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/PhryDom/PhryDomTOC.htm

E Phrygian Dominant (a video lesson including tab and notation) using an Indian slide-technique to skate around the fretboard, but also show some great ways to crave this scale up: http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/IndSlide2/indslidehome_frames.htm

I've been playing this scale for a long, long time and studied it exclusively for years. At some I need to do a tutorial on how I can find an application for over some many types of music. It's a wonderful scale. And, the scales inside of it are magic!

Have fun, cause you're going to learn some pretty cool sounds
#13
Yngwie Malmsteen always enters phrygian dominant domination mode for his most insane shreds
"Things seem pretty crummy, but if they could carry us away with them, we'd die of poetry. In a way, that wouldn't be bad." -Louis-Ferdinand Celine
#14
Phrygian Dominant Scale, it's quite common in metal, I think Lamb of God uses it quite regulary for songs, I know for a fact it's used on Laid to Rest. Furthermore I think I've heard Nevermore venture into it regularry, Yngwie Malmsteen shreds a lot in it, Unearth uses it as well I think? Not to sure on that one though.

On the less extreme side, it's also used in surf music, because it has this Spanish-ish feeling, it's for example used in the Pulp Fiction theme (Don't remember the name). And although I don't know if it's used there, but it's great to play Flamenco music.

I'm pretty convinced that every combination of notes/scale is already "invented" and used somewhere, there's simply quite a lot of music already made.
Guitasr:
Cort KX-Custom
ESP LTD M-200FM
Amp:
Engl Powerball
Misc:
Focusrite Scarlet 2i4
#15
Quote by pinguinpanic
for example used in the Pulp Fiction theme (Don't remember the name).


The name of the song is "Misirlou" by Dick Dale and his Del-tones. A very distinctive use of the Phrygian Dominant and a personal favorite of mine. An aside: The Pulp Fiction theme is a re-done version of Misirlou; I prefer the original as there's a little more going on: it's definitely worth a listen if you haven't heard the original.

The scale is also used in the solo to Rush's "YYZ".
#16
Quote by pinguinpanic
Phrygian Dominant Scale....Yngwie Malmsteen


Not a scale I'd attach Yngwie to, especially when he spends 99.999999% of the time in melodic/harmonic minor land.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#17
Quote by AlanHB
melodic/harmonic minor land.


Is that a sovereign state or just a territory?