#1
I understand what it means, and I know all solid guitars will as they are played, but what about all laminates or solid top/laminate side & back guitars? Also, if a guitar has been sitting for 30 years (all solid), will it still open up or is it too late due to age?
#2
not everyone believes that guitars do open up, but any solid wood part would do so, assuming that guitars open up in the first place.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#3
all-laminate guitars will never sound any better than they did the day the glue dried. I can attest to this as I've had and played the hell out of a laminate Epi PR-100 since 1998. No change since day 1.

Solid top guitars they say improve with age, but I'm not entirely convinced. I have an Epi Hummingbird from 1994 that I have had since 2007 and I don't think it's much different.

I also have a 2009 model Epi Masterbilt that I do think opened up over the course of about a year and an average of about 40 minutes a day playing it.


as far as sitting, the answer is no, it has to be played for the process of vibration to occur. read about what the Tonerite is supposed to do to understand better.

http://tonerite.com/
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#4
just because a guitar is sounding better in a year doesn't mean it's opening up. it could mean you're using better strings - or even older strings. it probably means that the glue and finish are cured and dried.

opening up is a process applied to much older than 1 year old guitars. we're talking 10+ years. that vibration causes this is very debatable. there are chemical processes, not just mechanical, that are part of anything that ages that isn't a rock. wood has chemicals that crystalize over time, and that will happen whether you play the guitar or not.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#5
What one person perceives as the guitar "opening up" may in fact just be your technique improving. People say it takes a decade or more for a guitar to completely open up. Think of how much your playing improves in a decade's time. I'm not discounting the theory that guitars open up, i know mine has ('94 Seagull SM6). I'm just saying that playing ability may play a roll in it.
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#6
Quote by patticake
just because a guitar is sounding better in a year doesn't mean it's opening up. it could mean you're using better strings - or even older strings. it probably means that the glue and finish are cured and dried.

opening up is a process applied to much older than 1 year old guitars. we're talking 10+ years. that vibration causes this is very debatable. there are chemical processes, not just mechanical, that are part of anything that ages that isn't a rock. wood has chemicals that crystalize over time, and that will happen whether you play the guitar or not.


I'm pretty sure every post I've ever made patticake has disagreed with me on

It's not the strings, I change them on all my guitars once a month and on the particular masterbilt I'm talking about here I always have used Gibson phospher bronze 12's. Anyway I've had it since early 2009 but really played it a lot the whole first year and ya I'd say it sounds way better today that it did when I bought it. Maybe it's the Houston humidity, who knows!

Never used a tonerite but I've had loads of people on the forums tell me they used it on a vintage guitar to "wake it up." I'd like to give it a try just to see what all the hype is about really!
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#8
I'm actually of the opinion that the guitar "degrades and changes" and that degredation is what people perceive as "opening up".

Let me put it this way...

New jeans are always a bit stiff. After a while, they get real nice with some thorough wearing. But at some point, the jeans start to break.

I think guitars can be thought of in a similar way.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#9
OK, keep in mind I am a keyboard player and record, mix & master my recordings and I think I have a real good ear. Recently I have been teaching myself guitar (electric) and even more recently I bought an acoustic (Silver Creek D170). When I got it, I was disappointed with the sound (warm tone but lifeless) so I ordered a Tusq saddle which I haven't got yet. I've been playing it for about 2 weeks several hours a day and noticed the last couple of days it has started to sound a lot better. Nothing has changed other than the time I've spent playing it. I went to the tonerite website and there were testimonies that claimed after a few days the tone on their guitars got better. I won't pretend to know why the D170 is starting to sound better, but one thing I do know is that it sounds considerably better than when I got it.
#10
To clarify what I was asking about a guitar that has sat for 30 years....will it open up if it gets played a lot. It is an all solid Yamaha that someone is looking to sell.
#11
Finally got the Tusq saddle. There is an improvement in clarity & sustain but not as much as I hoped.
#12
Is it real Tusq? i mean from an animal or is it synthetic. Cheers
#13
Quote by tuxs
Is it real Tusq? i mean from an animal or is it synthetic. Cheers

Tusq IS a synthetic ivory. Real ivory would be spelled Tusk, as in the tusk on an elephant or mammoth.
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#14
Yep, it is synthetic ivory which the claim is it is harder & more consistent than bone. At least that is their claim.
#15
Quote by petscar
Yep, it is synthetic ivory which the claim is it is harder & more consistent than bone. At least that is their claim.


That is indeed their "claim". Most luthiers will still tell you that bone and fossilized ivory are still the better way to go, however.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#16
Out of the synthetic materials, I quite like Delrin. It's great for nuts too, cause it's very slippery.
#17
Quote by petscar
OK, keep in mind I am a keyboard player and record, mix & master my recordings and I think I have a real good ear. Recently I have been teaching myself guitar (electric) and even more recently I bought an acoustic (Silver Creek D170). When I got it, I was disappointed with the sound (warm tone but lifeless) so I ordered a Tusq saddle which I haven't got yet. I've been playing it for about 2 weeks several hours a day and noticed the last couple of days it has started to sound a lot better. Nothing has changed other than the time I've spent playing it. I went to the tonerite website and there were testimonies that claimed after a few days the tone on their guitars got better. I won't pretend to know why the D170 is starting to sound better, but one thing I do know is that it sounds considerably better than when I got it.


It's quite possible that the improved sound is due to your improved technique and/or environmental changes in the room (humidity). It's hard to imagine that the wood in the Silver Creek would change that much in that time period. You may also like the sound of the broken in strings more than when they were newer.
#18
You might be right to an extent as I have learned to press down harder to get a cleaner sound. The SC sounds good but playability is a little rough even with a lowered action & extra light strings. But I do believe there is some credence to stimulate the wood by playing. It's not about aging the wood but rather stimulating the wood with acoustical vibrations which supposedly can affect tone within days. How much I can't say. Read the link that someone posted in an earlier post for tonerite. I am guessing people wouldn't pay $150 if it didn't work.