#1
Hello

I kinda tried to audition at a local bar and failed miserably.

I know I didn't have a lot of time to practice(didn't want to waste the opportunity).
Around 1 month to practice 10 songs(I only did 3 songs though )

I just noticed that I couldn't even look at the audience and was staring at the fretboard profusely.
Probably did not help that a lot of people here don't even know the Foo Fighters(Didn't have enough time to ask what was popular there, work and stuff).

Do you really need popular songs at a local bar at all times?
Is there no leeway for not so popular songs?

I played drums for a band once and I didn't actually have this problem when we played at a battle of the bands(I was the singer too).

I don't know how to translate my confidence from drums to guitar.

Any advice?
#2
Well you've answered your own question. The gig didn't go well because you didn't practice enough. Lack of practice = lack of comfotableness with the songs = nerves and poor performance.

Next time practice more beforehand.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#3
yeah even songs people know won't come across well with lack of practice. where were you playing that people didn't know the foo fighters? and what were the not so popular songs you played?
#4
You've learned a lot. That's part of the game. Now you know what the real world is like out there. That's how so many of us started. Welcome to the club. Take what you've learned and it will make you better in the future. You may not break through the next time or the next time after that, but you'll figure it out.

Sean
#5
The more you get up on stage the better you'll feel about performing as building confidence is a natural growth process. I can understand how drums might feel more secure because you have a lot of stuff in front of you, but if you're just up there with a guitar you're more exposed, especially if guitar isn't your main thing. That can add more pressure.

Was it an Open mic night? If so just try to keep going back, and look around for different Open Mics and just play the songs you love and they'll eventually sound great. Just keep at it.
And gauging the feel of the crowd is smart, but don't play songs you're so uncomfortable with that it doesn't represent you as a musician at all.
I'm sure if you do some Foo Fighter songs, and you do em well, and you are obviously feeling it, then the crowd can't help but respond positively.

One of the biggest mental transitions that I've had to learn was looking at the crowd with confidence. Just try to psyche yourself up for it, and you'll come off as a much better performer overall. I realized that no matter how scared I was of crowds and screwing up, at least I could pretend to appear confident just by not staring at my fretboard, or my shoes, the whole time. Just try to force yourself to look up at the crowd a few times at first, and then gradually you'll be a natural with it, and you can expand your stage presence in other ways.

Playing live, and building confidence, is really a never ending project for all musicians. Just try to see it as the fun time that it is and it makes everything much easier Also don't take it so seriously. It's a blessing to be able to have a platform to perform some of your favorite music in front of people, that's the beauty of live performance, the crowd can just sit there and appreciate, they aren't going to turn you off (sure a few might leave), so whatever you do, do it with feeling, and confidence, and always try to play more simply than you're comfortable with, rather than trying to over play, which can result in a disaster if you're not Steve Vai.

So yeah, Open mics and open jams are awesome for just getting a feel for it. I think if you stick to one or two bars' open mics for a long period of time, and you make noticable improvement, the regulars who go there will start loving you after a while and it could be a great experience.
have fun on your musical adventure my man!
#6
Quote by Four-Sticks
The more you get up on stage the better you'll feel about performing as building confidence is a natural growth process. I can understand how drums might feel more secure because you have a lot of stuff in front of you, but if you're just up there with a guitar you're more exposed, especially if guitar isn't your main thing. That can add more pressure.

Was it an Open mic night? If so just try to keep going back, and look around for different Open Mics and just play the songs you love and they'll eventually sound great. Just keep at it.
And gauging the feel of the crowd is smart, but don't play songs you're so uncomfortable with that it doesn't represent you as a musician at all.
I'm sure if you do some Foo Fighter songs, and you do em well, and you are obviously feeling it, then the crowd can't help but respond positively.

One of the biggest mental transitions that I've had to learn was looking at the crowd with confidence. Just try to psyche yourself up for it, and you'll come off as a much better performer overall. I realized that no matter how scared I was of crowds and screwing up, at least I could pretend to appear confident just by not staring at my fretboard, or my shoes, the whole time. Just try to force yourself to look up at the crowd a few times at first, and then gradually you'll be a natural with it, and you can expand your stage presence in other ways.

Playing live, and building confidence, is really a never ending project for all musicians. Just try to see it as the fun time that it is and it makes everything much easier Also don't take it so seriously. It's a blessing to be able to have a platform to perform some of your favorite music in front of people, that's the beauty of live performance, the crowd can just sit there and appreciate, they aren't going to turn you off (sure a few might leave), so whatever you do, do it with feeling, and confidence, and always try to play more simply than you're comfortable with, rather than trying to over play, which can result in a disaster if you're not Steve Vai.

So yeah, Open mics and open jams are awesome for just getting a feel for it. I think if you stick to one or two bars' open mics for a long period of time, and you make noticable improvement, the regulars who go there will start loving you after a while and it could be a great experience.
have fun on your musical adventure my man!


Thanks for the advice man

It was for regular gigging. Just wasn't used to being the center of attraction. Yup I'll try to be more confident or at least look more confident.
Last edited by gothblade at May 22, 2011,
#7
Do you really need popular songs at a local bar at all times?
yes pretty much. most people (especially if they are drunk) want to hear songs they know the words to. they could careless about the songs they don't know.

Is there no leeway for not so popular songs?
there is if you already have the audience in your hand. like if out of like 45 or 50 songs you have 1 or 2 not so popular songs, then that wouldn't be a problem, hell I would even say up to ten of them can work as long as they fit in with the rest of the setlist.

Any advice?
practice till you can play with your eyes closed, or with the lights off. if you can play without looking then you can work on stage pressence. when it comes to playing, think of it like swimming, take a deep breath and jump. once you're in you're in and you just have to keep going till you get back to dry land. I find that after I get through the first song, all the butterflys are gone. unfortunately no matter how long you do this, the nervousness felt before hitting the stage will probably not ever go away. all you have to do is learn what works for you to get past it.

the first thing that you need to do for it is to be able to play the songs forward and backward and everyway inbetween. then sometimes a drink or whatever might calm your nerves, just to loosen up a little. you know some liquid courage helps with the first song. personally I tend to sweat out what ever I drink on the first song

my question, are you solo or are you in a band?
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#8
Just practise more :/ Crowds are not always going to be great, get used to it.


Also the old band where you where a drummer + vocalist probably has no relavence. You where behind a drum kit (probably at the back).
It's a shield, between you and the crowd, they can't see you when you screw up, it's your safe place.

I can do vocals just fine when I'm playing with my band + playing the guitar...the moment I put that sucker down though jeez...it's like trying to get blood from a stone.
When I was eleven I broke the patio window and my mother sued me... She's always been a very aggressive litigator.