#1
...but atm I dont know how.

Over the last few months ive kinda hit a slight wall with playing where I have no clue on what I should improve on. Ive even learnt to play a few songs here and there but I only get intro-verse-chorus and then get bored and move on. I just memorised all 5 positions of minor pentatonic but I dont know how to connect them all together. Music theory is good, I know about scales (but dont know how to use them well), the circle of fifths and other some other stuff and as for technique, I know the basics such as hammer-ons, pull-offs and bends etc and know some of the basics of some advanced techniques like sweep picking.

Any clue on what I should do next? I think I always wanted to learn to play lead but then again I think I would be just as happy with rhythm. I always think both areas could be better though.

Any help is appricatied
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#2
you connect them by the root note. memorising scales is useless if you dont know what they are! play sensibly, plan what youre going to learn before you learn it.
#3
Quote by mafuhungy
you connect them by the root note. memorising scales is useless if you dont know what they are! play sensibly, plan what youre going to learn before you learn it.


I know what they are and I know how to use them but I dont know how to use them well. If you asked me to write a riff it will mostly look like its assending/desending down the scale and doesnt usually sound that inspiring.

I usually do that but recently Ive been thinking, "I dunno what to work on next"
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#4
That's just it, you don't "connect positions", or at least that's not how you should be approaching it in your mind.

A scale is a set of notes, chosen for the way they work together...all those positions are just the same 5 notes repeating over and over. You choose your notes based on the sound you want, where to play them will be influenced by several things, comfort, convenience, what else you're playing, the techniques you're using, the timbre of the note you get from that string etc. Taking all those things into account pretty much makes the decision of where to play for you - if you want to slide between a few notes then obviously you can't stay in one position, conversely if you want to play two notes simultaneously then they have to be within easy reach.

Likewise for techniques, you don't use techniques for the sake of them. Techniques are just different ways of moving between two notes, so you simply choose which ones to use based on the sound you want when transition between them.

You shouldn't be looking to the scale itself to guide you, look at the chords you're playing over. Soundwise the chords will use notes from the scale, and physically that translates to the patterns of chords and scales overlapping a great deal. Do this as an exercise - draw yourself out a blank fretboard diagram, take a pen and simply draw all the notes of a particular scale...E major is as good a choice as any. Then, take a different colour pen and draw out all the chords of the key of E major, just do full barre chords with the roots on the low E. Scales and chords are just the same thing, arranged differently - drawing them out like that will realy illustrate that to you.

Ultimately though keep reminding yourself that it's all about SOUND. Decide what sound you want to create BEFORE you start moving your fingers.
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