#1
Really basic question:

Assume you want to apply vibrato to a string with no pre-bent note at all. Lets say you're doing a 1/2 step vibrato. Will your vibrato always start at the root note (lets say C), bent up to C#, then return to C? Does proper vibrato always return to the base note? This is excluding exceptions where you bend up and then apply vibrato... I just want to make mine better. thanks.
tl;dr: does vibrato always return to the root of the bend (ex: It'd be weird to do a 1/2 step bend, then return to 1/4 of a bend and just do 1/4 step oscillations from 1/4 up to 1/2)
#3
Quote by TheChosen1One
Really basic question:

Assume you want to apply vibrato to a string with no pre-bent note at all. Lets say you're doing a 1/2 step vibrato. Will your vibrato always start at the root note (lets say C), bent up to C#, then return to C? Does proper vibrato always return to the base note? This is excluding exceptions where you bend up and then apply vibrato... I just want to make mine better. thanks.
tl;dr: does vibrato always return to the root of the bend (ex: It'd be weird to do a 1/2 step bend, then return to 1/4 of a bend and just do 1/4 step oscillations from 1/4 up to 1/2)


Really strong sounding vibrato usually does, yes, you need to keep that basic note within what you're doing or you just sound off-pitch. There may be cases where you want to sound off pitch but right now I can't think of any.
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#4
Disregard the first response, as it's irrelevant to your question.

The answer is yes. Vibrato bends of a note have to return to that note or they will sound like the vibrato of a higher note. Which is fine if you want it that way.
The more you say 'epic' the less it means.
Last edited by Dynamight at May 22, 2011,
#5
well, if you dont start your vibrato on the root than it would be a pre-bent note right
R.I.P. Randy Rhoads
#6
Quote by madh4ttr
well, if you dont start your vibrato on the root than it would be a pre-bent note right


Not quite that simple; if you start vibrato on a note and in between each bend you don't return to the note you started on, say you only return to a note that's 1/4 or even 1/8 of a step out of pitch with the original note it'll sound pretty damn horrible, yo destroy the effect of the original note. It seems to be a quirk of human hearing that as long as you return to the same pitch after each 'bend' you accept it as being that note with vibrato but if you don't return to the right pitch it just sounds out of place.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
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#7
Yes it will sound wrong.

"Vibrato" isn't the same as "bending to and from a note", although sometimes this is how it's done. Vibrato is an effect where the pitch of a note "wobbles" slightly, and it can be done in a few different ways (classical style, bending, with the whammy bar etc).

In your example, if the vibrato is on a C note, then it's that C note that's "wobbling". You might go a quarter tone higher or lower (you might even go a semitone or whole tone either way) but the underlying note will still be a C.

So yeh, you'll have to start and end on the C, but you could argue that you never really left the C in the first place. It was just a C with vibrato. If you're bending up to a C# for any length of time- or ending on a C#- then you've bent up to a C# and that's not vibrato. Same if you started on a C# and ended on a C (you've bent down to a C).

I.e. vibrato on a C note is note: C - C# - C - Cb - C. It's a C with vibrato.
#8
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Not quite that simple; if you start vibrato on a note and in between each bend you don't return to the note you started on, say you only return to a note that's 1/4 or even 1/8 of a step out of pitch with the original note it'll sound pretty damn horrible, yo destroy the effect of the original note. It seems to be a quirk of human hearing that as long as you return to the same pitch after each 'bend' you accept it as being that note with vibrato but if you don't return to the right pitch it just sounds out of place.

I think you misunderstood what I said. I stated that if you start a note that isnt on the root, then it would be pre bent before you start the vibrato. I know that when you return your vibrato, it needs to return to the root or it wont sound right. If you start on a c#, then you keep returning your vibrato to the c#. If you start your vibrato on a d, then you return it the d during the vibrato.
R.I.P. Randy Rhoads
Last edited by madh4ttr at May 23, 2011,
#9
It's hard to pin down a technique that everyone is familiar with but has their own view on and explanation. There are so many ways to get vibrato and types depending on the mood that you really have to go for what sounds good to you and develop it from there.
A lot of players use the "Greg Howe" vibrato because they feel that bending notes in and out of tune in "Incorrect" yet the technique has existed since a string has been able to be plucked on a piece of wood.

Singers are a great resource for vibrato. I also have a downloadable lesson that would be worth checking out.

http://joepinnavaia.weebly.com/lessons.html

All the best,
Joe
#10
Quote by madh4ttr
I think you misunderstood what I said. I stated that if you start a note that isnt on the root, then it would be pre bent before you start the vibrato. I know that when you return your vibrato, it needs to return to the root or it wont sound right. If you start on a c#, then you keep returning your vibrato to the c#. If you start your vibrato on a d, then you return it the d during the vibrato.


1 - Stop using the term "root", it has no bearing on this since this isn't a scale or chord question.

2 - It doesn't matter whether the note is pre-bent, bent, un-bent, on two guitars at once, or whatever: you have a note, if you're adding vibrato you return to that note between each change in pitch and preferably you take it to the same pitch with each oscillation in vibrato as well. Simple.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

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#11
Quote by chainsawguitar

I.e. vibrato on a C note is note: C - C# - C - Cb - C. It's a C with vibrato.

not with regular finger vibrato on guitar man, it only goes sharp and returns to normal