#1
Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mc-u1YHx0mI

Alright so I pretty much just finished transcribing the entire guitar solo and have a few questions about what I've just memorized. The guitar solo starts at around 3:30. Anyways, the guitarist makes some great use of the harmonic minor and I wanted to know some of the theory as to why he it sounds good where he does use it. (eg. the run that starts at 4:24). It kinda goes out for a second with the harmonic minor and then resolves back. Is this how the scale is typically used? And when is it usually most appropriate?

Second Question:
There's a run that starts around 5:34-5:45. What scale is being used during this run? It has some elements of the harmonic minor..but I'm not sure what else. I can try to tab it out..

|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|--15-14-12-15-14----14-12------------------------------------------------------------
|-----------------------15--------14-12-14-12-----11-----11-12-11-----------------
|----------------------------------------------------14-----14-------------13-12--------
|-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------15-14
|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


|--------------------------------------12-14-12-14-12-----12-14-12----12-14-12-----
|-----------------------------12-14------------------------12-----------12------------12---
|-----11-11----11-12-14-------------------------------------------------------------
|--14-------14----------------------------------------------------------------------
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Etc. That's the majority of the run. And I now see why people who learn things by ear always insist that they "dont know how to write tabs because they learned by ear". lol. If anybody can help me out that'd be great. Thanks!
#4
Yeah Georgie Porgie jam. That's the right video. Any thoughts on the questions I had on it?
#5
You're the one who tabbed it out. Find the key and scales he uses. Any out of key notes are called accidentals for future reference. An accidental is used rather than a whole different scale/key for the period of that one note.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#6
I know the parent scale. It's in E minor, but you know how sometimes people switch the scale depending on what chord or the different the different scales that could also be used to attain a different "feel" or sound. That's what I was asking about. The run I posted aren't really accidentals..more like a whole different scale that he used for just a second to get that "out" sound.
#8
Quote by SEANannigans
I know the parent scale. It's in E minor, but you know how sometimes people switch the scale depending on what chord or the different the different scales that could also be used to attain a different "feel" or sound. That's what I was asking about. The run I posted aren't really accidentals..more like a whole different scale that he used for just a second to get that "out" sound.


Do you know the chord progression? If it's in E minor, the scale will always be E minor, with the "out" sound created by accidentals. If you look at the chords played underneath, you'll get a better idea of why it sounds "out" to you.

Edit: With a quick glance over the tab, I can see two accidentals used. A major 7th and a sharp 6th. Can you think of any scales that may have inspired him to use these accidentals? An E minor scale with a major 7th? An E minor scale with a sharp 6?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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