#1
I've just started experimenting with electronic music and one of my tracks is going to feature a Buddhist chant to be used as a sample. I've looked around the internet for rules/legality issues on sampling and I don't know if the same things apply (as all of these sources say different things).

So basically, am I allowed to post up a song that features a sample or is this breaking the law? If so, how do I get around this?
#2
Generally, you don't need permission unless you plan to profit from selling the recording in some fashion or another. However, since you're using a Buddist chant, I would think that most religious songs are in the public domain, so you wouldn't need permission anyway. Better check to make sure.
I can only listen to so many breakdowns and "spoken word" vocals before I wanna puke.

I find Jennette McCurdy attractive, but Elizabeth Gillies and Debby Ryan much more so.

That's enough, Djent people. We get it.
#3
You get permission from the source.
You must have known where you got it. Send an email to whoever owned the audio beforehand. Otherwise it could bite you in the butt if you're making a profit from it.
#4
Right, thanks for the feedback guys.

I managed to get a contact from one of the guys involved - the Czech chant manager. I guess I just feel stupid saying "I'm a 17 year old nobody who wants to use yer' song in some dubstep!" but yeah, better to play it safe nonetheless.
#5
Quote by gquady09
Generally, you don't need permission unless you plan to profit from selling the recording in some fashion or another. However, since you're using a Buddist chant, I would think that most religious songs are in the public domain, so you wouldn't need permission anyway. Better check to make sure.


While a particular piece of music may be in the public domain, this usually only allows you to perform it yourself without owing royalties an' what-not. If you sample someone else's recording of a piece, that recording is still protected and you will require permission to use it.

Example: Beethoven's Fifth is in the public domain, but the Philharmonic's performance of it is not.
#6
Carson is absolutely right, whereas gquady09 is entirely incorrect about the "unless you plan to profit from it" part. I'm not sure why that is such a popular myth.

The short answer is that there are three levels of ownership when dealing with samples, and you need to clear it with all three.
-the composition
-the performance
-the master recording

For more info check this post in the copyright for dummies thread under the bandleading subforum.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showpost.php?p=18362383&postcount=29

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Quote by axemanchris
I'm not sure why that is such a popular myth.

I have a pretty good idea. It's a cross between the popularity of such things as the Creative Commons License and an attitude of "I'm not important enough to sue".

Seems like "right" = "what I can reasonably get away with" on the Interwebs these days.

OP, I'd be keen to hear this composition of yours once it's done.
#8
Thanks for the extra knowledge guys, those articles from that Canadian lawyer were pretty decent in explaining it all.

Yeah, I guess that I just figured given I'm not well known enough it wouldn't be too big a problem but I'll just have to wait and see what'll happen. As for the piece, I've been wanting to put it up for a while now - glad I listened to my concious and didn't act overly savvy about it.