#1
can somebody please tell me:
if a gibson SG, Les Paul, firebird, flying V and explorer standards
had the same pickups and were played through the same amp, what would be the difference in sound?
#2
The LP would be thicker sounding, the Explorer would be shredding sounding, the SG would sound crunchy and the Flying V would SCREAM IN YOUR FACE WITH METAL !!!!!!!
#3
They have their own characteristics, which are simply not easy to explain. Lord_Doku gave it a good try though.
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#5
check out the wood's and weight
then research the effect they have on sound

that'd be the best way to understand it... other than actually going in and testing them
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#6
The biggest difference would be between the Les Paul and the other ones, since the LP has a maple top.
#7
as far as telling you in objective terms what the difference would be, it's pretty hard.

however, there is a difference in the natural tones of all the gibson models, as a result of different construction (the les paul has a maple top, firebird is neck-thru, etc), different shapes (single cut, double-cut, offset body etc - this affects the way the vibrations travel through the wood and influence the string vibrations), etc etc.

there are a lot of factors that are difficult to explain, but there definitely is a difference.
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#8
I tried that once - going to Guitar Center and running them all through one amp - and found that yes, the Les Paul sounded a bit more dimensional and defined with more low end, the SG sounded messier and wilder with more high-mids and highs, and the V and Explorer were fairly even response-wise.
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#9
I just spent 5 mins trying to rack my brain for the most appropriate adjectives to describe the tonal differences between the LP and the SG. Having vomited out a few vacuous descriptions that probably won't mean anything to you I deleted all and thought, this guy should just watch some videos.

See if on youtube you can find someone playing with the same setup each of the guitars you want to compare.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YVB_6SBjBA

maybe something like that
#10
All the same pick-ups played with the same setting on the guitar and the amp...you'd be hard pressed to tell the difference. The tone woods make a slight difference, but it is not THAT pronounced.. I'd wager 7 outta 10 players wouldn't be able to tell the difference in a blind listening test.
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#11
Quote by Lord_Doku
The LP would be thicker sounding, the Explorer would be shredding sounding, the SG would sound crunchy and the Flying V would SCREAM IN YOUR FACE WITH METAL !!!!!!!


A fine example of someone that has never touched a Gibson guitar in their life. Yes they would sound different because of different construction and overall body mass.Even 2 of the exact same guitar will sound different.
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#12
Quote by Lord_Doku
The LP would be thicker sounding, the Explorer would be shredding sounding, the SG would sound crunchy and the Flying V would SCREAM IN YOUR FACE WITH METAL !!!!!!!

Yes, because that's exactly what they had in mind when they released the V and Explorer back in the 50's...genres that hadn't been invented yet.

SG's tend to sound a bit raunchier and less refined than Les Pauls, also tonally they're less rounded as they lack the maple cap.
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#13
put it this way..... no two guitars will ever sound exactly the same.....because no two guitars are made with the same piece of wood.
#14
Well, they use the same woods (mostly) and hardware. The main difference would be mass, and the les paul's maple top.

There would be a difference in sound, but I think it would be fairly subtle.
#15
i have three somewhat matching sets of gibsons. 2 LP's, 2 SG's, and 2x 1980 Sonex's.

the LP's are more refined and fat and have a little more sustain than the SG's, while the SG's are a little almost twangier acoustically, but nastier than the LP's amplified and seem to be more dominent in the mid high -mid range. the Sonex's are obviuosly out of production, but they are 100% identical, same color, and manufactured less than a month apart according to serials. the sonex's are a whole different animal and i cannot explain them at all, and they also sound totally different.
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#16
Quote by trashedlostfdup
i have three somewhat matching sets of gibsons. 2 LP's, 2 SG's, and 2x 1980 Sonex's.

the LP's are more refined and fat and have a little more sustain than the SG's, while the SG's are a little almost twangier acoustically, but nastier than the LP's amplified and seem to be more dominent in the mid high -mid range. the Sonex's are obviuosly out of production, but they are 100% identical, same color, and manufactured less than a month apart according to serials. the sonex's are a whole different animal and i cannot explain them at all, and they also sound totally different.

this is the only accurate description of an SG sound i've read on UG for a long time.

for some reason people always seem to assume that angus young's tone is a typical SG tone - it really isn't. it's a typical vintage marshall crunch tone, where certain nuances of the guitar's tone are being covered up by the very strong characteristics of the amp - although you can still hear certain distinct SG character in his tone, i think people mistake a lot of the amp's sound for how the guitar sounds.

SGs are very mid-rangey guitars, and those raunchy high frequencies are actually high mids, and that's where that aggressive biting tone comes from - it's not treble. SGs only have very a subtle shimmer in the treble register that you can only really hear on bright clean settings, and the bass is much more of a foundation than a distinct feature of the sound - it's mostly mids.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.