#1
Im interesting in recording myself and making it sound pretty professional, but I have no idea what kind of equipment I would need. I dont want to go to a studio, I'd just like to be able to record and edit my own bands music at home.
Any things I should know?
thanks
#2
I use a 16track recorder called the zoom hd16 which works pretty well, it also allows you to record 8 tracks at the same time so if your band ever want to do a live recording then it would work great for that. If I were you i'd look up reviews of various 16 track recorders and see which one would work best for what you want to do and your budget
Uploaded some MP3's onto my profile, please check 'em out & let me know what you think! :3
#3
What's your budget and how many instruments do you need to simultaneously record?

How professional is "pretty professional"?
#4
Quote by Housequake
I use a 16track recorder called the zoom hd16 which works pretty well, it also allows you to record 8 tracks at the same time so if your band ever want to do a live recording then it would work great for that. If I were you i'd look up reviews of various 16 track recorders and see which one would work best for what you want to do and your budget

damn! are they like 1000$ and up?! Im thinking maybe one or two instruments at the max recorded at once. and is that all i need to record, or do i need to buy extra stuff?
#5
Quote by Arby911
What's your budget and how many instruments do you need to simultaneously record?

How professional is "pretty professional"?

good enough to make a demo tape or cd. somthing that can be used to eliminate background noise and sound clear.
#6
Quote by ThrashKing
Im interesting in recording myself and making it sound pretty professional, but I have no idea what kind of equipment I would need. I dont want to go to a studio, I'd just like to be able to record and edit my own bands music at home.
Any things I should know?
thanks


if your looking to do it cheaply, something like this might work for you......

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?client=safari&rls=en&q=digital+4+track&oe=UTF-8&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=6988887877566976858&sa=X&ei=NufbTf-tKOe70QH_pc3aDw&ved=0CFQQ8gIwAQ&biw=1179&bih=702#

+ a decent mic


Or you could get into the daw thing. (Logic, Cubase, protools...ect).
That costs $ though.
shred is gaudy music
#7
Quote by GuitarMunky
if your looking to do it cheaply, something like this might work for you......

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?client=safari&rls=en&q=digital+4+track&oe=UTF-8&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=6988887877566976858&sa=X&ei=NufbTf-tKOe70QH_pc3aDw&ved=0CFQQ8gIwAQ&biw=1179&bih=702#

+ a decent mic


Or you could get into the daw thing. (Logic, Cubase, protools...ect).
That costs $ though.
thanks dude!
#8
You didn't mention what your budget was, so I'll assume it's minimal.

Look at something like a Behringer Xenyx 1204usb, since you can record directly to your computer.
#10
Quote by ThrashKing
Im interesting in recording myself and making it sound pretty professional, but I have no idea what kind of equipment I would need. I dont want to go to a studio, I'd just like to be able to record and edit my own bands music at home.
Any things I should know?
thanks


Yes, study recording engineering. If you don't want to pay the guys that know, you're going to have to do their work, by yourself. If that means months of research into the recording, harmonic frequencies, mixing and mastering process, then that's what you are left with in order to have a pretty professional result. Otherwise, expect to make a lot of crappy recordings and learn by trial and error.

I say this as someone that is making a series of self-produced pre demos. Its a lot harder than you think, to get a pro sound. Equipment will only get you so far, you have to know how to use it, and its more than fiddling with buttons. It's FAR cheaper to save my money and hire people that know what they are doing, that's why I am developing my songs to a pre-demo stage only and not willing to release them as finished works, when I go intot he studio, the engineer and producer will already have some idea of the song, and they can put their pro touches to it. This can save many many hours/$$$ than if I just showed up with a song and no clue.

I've used that DP-4 I didn't like it, its a bit cumbersome, and the mixdowns remind me of old 4 track tapes. My current rig is, believe it or not, recording on my iPhone using Sonoma, and a Cajon for coming up with a scratch beat, and then using a drum machine on the iPhone, to come close to that basic beat, and then transporting that to Reaper for some editing. It's still not anything close to pro. I also have read a lot of books such as the Guerrilla Guide to Home Recording, and I own the Hal Leonard Recording Series which costs several hundred dollars. I know enough now about it to really appreciate what it takes to make a good record, and to convince me that there's a reason that record engineers and producers get paid the bucks that they do.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at May 24, 2011,
#11
Quote by Sean0913


I've used that DP-4 I didn't like it, its a bit cumbersome, and the mixdowns remind me of old 4 track tapes.


Interesting, maybe that's because it's a digital version of the old cassette tape 4 tracks. I used to spend hours and hours with mine. Alot of fun, and I learned quite a bit from that experience. For the $ it's not a bad way to get into it, though there are plenty of options nowadays.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 24, 2011,
#12
Quote by Sean0913
Yes, study recording engineering. If you don't want to pay the guys that know, you're going to have to do their work, by yourself. If that means months of research into the recording, harmonic frequencies, mixing and mastering process, then that's what you are left with in order to have a pretty professional result. Otherwise, expect to make a lot of crappy recordings and learn by trial and error.

I say this as someone that is making a series of self-produced pre demos. Its a lot harder than you think, to get a pro sound. Equipment will only get you so far, you have to know how to use it, and its more than fiddling with buttons. It's FAR cheaper to save my money and hire people that know what they are doing, that's why I am developing my songs to a pre-demo stage only and not willing to release them as finished works, when I go intot he studio, the engineer and producer will already have some idea of the song, and they can put their pro touches to it. This can save many many hours/$$$ than if I just showed up with a song and no clue.

I've used that DP-4 I didn't like it, its a bit cumbersome, and the mixdowns remind me of old 4 track tapes. My current rig is, believe it or not, recording on my iPhone using Sonoma, and a Cajon for coming up with a scratch beat, and then using a drum machine on the iPhone, to come close to that basic beat, and then transporting that to Reaper for some editing. It's still not anything close to pro. I also have read a lot of books such as the Guerrilla Guide to Home Recording, and I own the Hal Leonard Recording Series which costs several hundred dollars. I know enough now about it to really appreciate what it takes to make a good record, and to convince me that there's a reason that record engineers and producers get paid the bucks that they do.

Best,

Sean
oh yeah, thats sort of what i was talking about. mixing it and all that shit. well then...haha ill just look into that DP-4 then for now and see where that takes me. thanks for all the help