#1
Okay I need some assistance here

Basically I've got this leavers musical thing where we're playing queen shizzle (I mentioned this stuff in a thread when I had a different query)
On the ending piece where everyone be bowing it's all improvised solo's
Knowing all the guitarists I'm with, they will most probably go pentatonic scale (1st position), blues and natural minor at a push

What I want a scale which will help me stand out from this
a) Because it will help me stand out
b) Because it will then motivate me into learning all of it's patterns

The piece is in the Key of E major, my relative minor being C#
The chords I'm going over are E, E sus4, G, C and D

So basically what scale mode can I go in throughout this piece
And how could I give it a metalcore-ish influence (as most of my improvised stuff sounds TOO bluesey
#2
Well, actually your song is not in the key of Emajor. The first chord being Emajor doesn`t mean that it`s the key. It`s actually Gmajor/Eminor but the 6th(G)/3rd(Em) is raised in the first chord.
So play E minor (E - F# - G - A - D - B - C - D) but change the G into a G# when you`re playing E/Esus4. You can also just play the G if you use it in licks or something. If you play it as a whole note it might sound a bit dissonant.
Metalcore-ish influence may be provided with playing a b2 now and then.
To stand out maybe use the E-Dorian/G-Lydian. Or even maybe D harmonic minor...
Last edited by MaXiMuse at May 24, 2011,
#3
Honestly, if your friends are going to be using just pentatonic/blues, you'd stand out by using the major scale with tasteful use of chromatics. The G, C, and D are all borrowed from the parallel minor (Em). So you would do fine using E major for the E and Esus4, then switching to the E minor scale for the G, C and D.
#6
Quote by MaXiMuse
Well, actually your song is not in the key of Emajor. The first chord being Emajor doesn`t mean that it`s the key. It`s actually Gmajor/Eminor but the 6th(G)/3rd(Em) is raised in the first chord.


That's arguable, we'd have to hear the song to understand how it resolves. One of the most common minor chord progressions is the VI - VII - i. VI works as a subdominant and VII the dominant. He's likely just borrowing the VI - VII while resolving to a major triad. It's not as strong a resolution as resolving to the minor, but it still works (and much better than Esus4 -> G). In this case, the G is used to be a secondary dominant to set up the C.

See "A Little Help From My Friends" by the Beatles for the C - D - E resolution.

EDIT: If your song truly is in Emajor with several borrowed chords, playing the Em scale over the G, C, and D would take care of "tasteful chromatics". Just so you know where I am coming from:

If the key is E major, people are expected to hear the E major scale. When you play G, your chord tones are G, B and D. G and D are chromatic to E major (not in the major scale). Likewise C contains C, E and G where C and G are chromatic and D has D, F# and A, where D is chromatic. Since these chromatic tones are all present in the Em scale, I think you're set.
Last edited by soviet_ska at May 24, 2011,
#7
here's your assistance.

if you're looking for a scale that will help you stand out, you're looking in all the wrong places. it's how you use the notes you choose that make you stand out. it's how you voice your chords, how you counterpoint your melodies, how you craft your rhythms.

if still you insist on beating a dead horse:

your chords are E, Esus4, G, C, and D. you're going to use E major for the E chord, and use E minor for the G, C, and D (you might actually use G major, it depends on the context -- i'm assuming this progression is repeated, so i'd call it E minor rather than G major). that Esus4 is actually well-placed - it will allow you to switch easily between E major and minor (assuming you know your stuff).

forget about "patterns". learn notes. we make music with notes, not patterns.

if your improvised material is too bluesy for your taste:

1) study the concept of phrasing
2) use scales other than minor pentatonic and blues

i'm willing to bet your problem lies in one (if not both) of those points.
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#8
A scale won't make you stand out, choosing the right notes over the backing and phrasing things interestingly will.


If the key is in E major then either use E major or E minor if a bluesy sound will fit - your "relative minor" is irrelevant in this situation. Don't try to crowbar a weird scale into the equation because you think it'll be more impressive - it won't be.

Use E major or E minor depending on how the progression plays out, although quite often you can modulate between the two of them, and instead of trying to find a scale get off the internet and start working out a solo!

[EDIT] It's we will rock you isn't it? In that case E minor is the best way to go, but like I said you can play around modulating between E minor and E major.
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#9
Okay then....
The General Census

Phrasing is required
And when playing over the E major/E sus4 chords I should use E Major
And when playing over C/D/G chords I should use E minor

EDIT: Yes it is mister Seagull, cept it's the ending version where you got them chords being played in a relatively speedy manner
Last edited by Highelf04 at May 24, 2011,
#10
Work your way around the notes of each chord. Going off on E major scale won't sound too good over a progression like that.
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#11
Quote by Highelf04
Okay then....
The General Census

Phrasing is required
And when playing over the E major/E sus4 chords I should use E Major
And when playing over C/D/G chords I should use E minor

EDIT: Yes it is mister Seagull, cept it's the ending version where you got them chords being played in a relatively speedy manner



Not necessarily, but listen to how the notes you're using affect the overall harmony. For example half-step shifts from out of key notes to chord tones are a really powerful tool when it comes to making interesting solos, the Hotel California solo has some great examples of that.

If you want to make it more "metal" then that's more about how you play rather than what. Dig into the strings more agressively, over-emphasise yout bends and vibrato, throw in some palm-mutes and harmonics.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#12
Quote by steven seagull
Not necessarily, but listen to how the notes you're using affect the overall harmony. For example half-step shifts from out of key notes to chord tones are a really powerful tool when it comes to making interesting solos, the Hotel California solo has some great examples of that.

If you want to make it more "metal" then that's more about how you play rather than what. Dig into the strings more agressively, over-emphasise yout bends and vibrato, throw in some palm-mutes and harmonics.

Cool
Cheers Mister Seagull and everyone else who pitched in on this
#13
Don't be afraid to repeat stuff either...a little 3 or 4 note motif repeated for a couple of bars is an effective device in a solo and non-muso audience members usually respond to them well. Recalling the vocal melody is another tried and tested trick, you'll certainly get a better response from the audience by doing something like that than you would by noodling in the Hungarian minor scale. Following on from that, throwing in snippets of familiar melodies is another great trick provided you don't over do it....little bits of chart songs, ad jingles, tv themes etc. Keeps the audience interested and engaged with a minimum of effort on your part work out the melody or even find a tab, and if it doesn't fit with the backing you should be able to transpose it to fit.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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