#1
A friend of mine got me interested in playing guitar, so I went and purchased a Fender CD-60. A very decent guitar for $200 with case on sale. I started learning chords, and have learned all the common chords, and some of the barre chords... after that, things started to plateau.

I tried to learn a few songs, but I've been struggling with making my own sound. Instead everything I play sounds very forced. I've also struggled with certain things, making the whole song worthless. My voice is very horrible, in that I can only sing in low tuning, and I just can't vary it much at all.

Stuff I've attempted learning:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y1A8WD8GDRE

Status: Fingers too short

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOYddNO-C0U

Status: Solo... lol, que?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdIjuTAiWtI

Status: Fingers ripped to shreds

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBWZcIizNbs

Status: G7 to Bb maj7 in 2.4s, G to Bb maj7 in 3.1s

BRB Can't afford guitar lessons.
BRB Don't know what to do...
BRB Practicing hasn't really improved anything much
BRB Stuck in rut

Wut do UG, wut do?


wait for it...


wait for it...





EDIT: UG doesn't support youtube embed, UG, I am disappoint.
Last edited by foreveranoob at May 24, 2011,
#2
Jesus Christ that's a long post. First off, forget about your voice. That's a question for the Singing & Vocals subforum in MT. Second, practice more. If you're still counting chord changes in seconds, you need to practice more. I get the feeling that you haven't been playing for more than a few months, which leaves tons of room for improvement. Learn ALL your chords (or at least the common voicings), learn the major and minor scales. Learn lots of songs (a course of action I highly recommend), if only to increase your musical vocabulary. Do this for about a year. If you're still in a rut, learn a completely different style of music. It worked for me.

Also, be prepared to have your arse torn apart. There's enough noobs bitching without another adding to it.

EDIT: This is also the wrong forum for this thread. Try reposting a more polished version in Guitar Techniques (e.g. minus the massive photo and "wait for it", telling your life story (it's generally best to just ask your question, then stfu)).
Quote by SonOfPest
Its the Lydian mode; formed in Eastern Arabia when the Persians invaded England.


Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
try the sexolydian scale.
Last edited by jwd724 at May 24, 2011,
#3
intedasting...

I've been playing for a year now. Practicing a half hour each day. I also lift heavy, so I don't know how that's affecting forearm dexterity. As hard as I try, complex chord changes are are really hard for me.

Lulz, misc linguo is not welcome at UG.

kthnxbai
#5
Quote by foreveranoob

I've been playing for a year now. Practicing a half hour each day. I also lift heavy, so I don't know how that's affecting forearm dexterity. As hard as I try, complex chord changes are are really hard for me.


Try bumping it up to an hour a day. It might be just my personal preference, but half an hour never seemed to be enough time to do a proper practice.

Working out shouldn't be a problem if you're doing it safely (e.g. not warming up by maxing out your deadlift). Although I've occasionally noticed that it can temporarily impede dexterity, a few exercises will remedy that.

Define complex chord changes. Like neapolitan chords or barre/open chords? There's a lot of variability there.
Quote by SonOfPest
Its the Lydian mode; formed in Eastern Arabia when the Persians invaded England.


Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
try the sexolydian scale.
#6
Quote by jwd724
Try bumping it up to an hour a day. It might be just my personal preference, but half an hour never seemed to be enough time to do a proper practice.

Working out shouldn't be a problem if you're doing it safely (e.g. not warming up by maxing out your deadlift). Although I've occasionally noticed that it can temporarily impede dexterity, a few exercises will remedy that.

Define complex chord changes. Like neapolitan chords or barre/open chords? There's a lot of variability there.


I'll try to increase my practice time, but that eats time out of university, yes, summer courses. feelsbadman.jpeg

I actually had a case of tendinosis from pushing my deads too much, and repping CoC 2s. That definitely hampered my strength, quite a bit more buzz in the strings at that point.

I've tried to find good tableture or guide books on exercises and things to practice; otherwise, when I improvise, I start to improvise the same general patterns over and over again.

I still haven't mastered a complete song, just excerpts from a whole bunch of tunes. Any recommendations?

I look at other people playing, and they seem to have much better open chord to barre chord changes, and much faster as well. I can get the changes to happen quickly, but I often miss a string or two, and the rhythm slows due to the mistake.
Last edited by foreveranoob at May 25, 2011,
#7
Well, I am sure all of us at UG can recommend our favorite acoustic songs. Many are just the exact same chord progressions. Two that come to mind:

The Messenger - Linkin Park
Wonderwall - Oasis It has some variation but playing the same progression along with the songs sounds good too
#8
Quote by foreveranoob

I look at other people playing, and they seem to have much better open chord to barre chord changes, and much faster as well. I can get the changes to happen quickly, but I often miss a string or two, and the rhythm slows due to the mistake.


Then I'll have to do what almost every user here (at least anyone worth his salt) and recommend that practice changes at a tempo slow enough for you to do it perfectly. Gradually increase speed until ready, ideally with a metronome.
Quote by SonOfPest
Its the Lydian mode; formed in Eastern Arabia when the Persians invaded England.


Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
try the sexolydian scale.
#9
Only a year!?!?!?
Cripes! I been playing off and on for near half a Century (mostly "off) and still working at learning new stuff.
Sure...we all want instant gratification; but good things do take some time, yanno

Best,
D-10