#1
So, we all know that playing a bass through a guitar amp can hurt guitar speakers, and playing a guitar through a bass amp makes the guitar sound "off" because of the difference in EQ, but here's an interesting question...

What if you play guitar through a guitar amp that is plugged into a bass cabinet? Or better yet, a guitar cabinet with 12" bass speakers? How about a bass guitar plugged into a guitar amp that is plugged into a bass cabinet (or a guitar cabinet with bass speakers).

I was explaining to one of my friends about what could happen if you plugged a bass into a guitar amp, and he asked me this question and I haven't been able to get it off my mind since. So give me answer guys, what would happen in these situations?

Thanks everyone!
#2
nothign it might not sound that good but youd have really noproblems that i can see as the only thing you can damage is the speaker in playing with bass amp and viceversa

btw i heard of some people playing guitar with a bass cab for the better low end
#3
speakers have a certain frequency that they operate at. if you go out of that frequency, you risk damaging the speakers. if you were running two 12" bass speakers plugged into a guitar head, the frequency of the high range of the guitar would could wreck the speakers if they weren't meant to handle that frequency regardless of the amplification going into the cabinet.


bottom line, speakers are manufactured for certain specs for certain applications, in general don't deviate from factory specs if you want to have the ideal operating conditions.

it have been up for 36 hours so hopefully this makes some sense.
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#4
Quote by trashedlostfdup
speakers have a certain frequency that they operate at. if you go out of that frequency, you risk damaging the speakers. if you were running two 12" bass speakers plugged into a guitar head, the frequency of the high range of the guitar would could wreck the speakers if they weren't meant to handle that frequency regardless of the amplification going into the cabinet.


bottom line, speakers are manufactured for certain specs for certain applications, in general don't deviate from factory specs if you want to have the ideal operating conditions.

it have been up for 36 hours so hopefully this makes some sense.


It made sense, no worries.

What if it was a bass guitar > guitar amp > bass cabinet? Would it still wreck the speakers? Even though it's going through a guitar amp, it's still a bass guitar
#5
my friends Orange AD140 sounded pretty good through his two TC Electronic Bass Cabs. I would go guitar head into bass speakers, but not vice versa.
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#6
Quote by kracdown
my friends Orange AD140 sounded pretty good through his two TC Electronic Bass Cabs. I would go guitar head into bass speakers, but not vice versa.


thats not to say that all bass speakers can't handle higher frequencies, but i would imagine a lot/some of them couldn't.

if you are looking for bassier tone there are a few 15" guitar speakers on the market. i have a cab that has two 12"s and one 15" in it from randall. the eminence legend is a good speaker for that. i use that with my Splawn PM.
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Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



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2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
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#8
Quote by trashedlostfdup
thats not to say that all bass speakers can't handle higher frequencies, but i would imagine a lot/some of them couldn't.

if you are looking for bassier tone there are a few 15" guitar speakers on the market. i have a cab that has two 12"s and one 15" in it from randall. the eminence legend is a good speaker for that. i use that with my Splawn PM.

High frequencies take far less power to make, bass speakers will produce less highs but playing high notes will not damage them. The bass notes are the only things that generally are a problem with guitar speakers because of how much more power is required to make adequate low end due to the fact that our ears hear low end with far more difficulty than mids and high mids.
#9
Quote by Zoot Allures
High frequencies take far less power to make, bass speakers will produce less highs but playing high notes will not damage them. The bass notes are the only things that generally are a problem with guitar speakers because of how much more power is required to make adequate low end due to the fact that our ears hear low end with far more difficulty than mids and high mids.


good to know, thanks for the info.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#10
Quote by trashedlostfdup
if you were running two 12" bass speakers plugged into a guitar head, the frequency of the high range of the guitar would could wreck the speakers if they weren't meant to handle that frequency

Electric bass commonly produces harmonics within the range of electric guitar though. The whole reason it's fine to play guitar through a bass amp and cabinet is that the range covered by bass guitar overlaps that of the electric guitar.

You wouldn't want to play a bass>guitar amp>bass cabinet because the bass produces fundamentals in the range of 30-40 Hz and the guitar amp isn't designed to reproduce or handle frequencies that low. As I understand it - it'd create a load that would 'have nowhere to go'. This might not cause a problem initially, or at low volumes - but you'd be operating outside the specs of the amp and be opening the door to problems.

Edit:
Beaten to it.
Quote by Zoot Allures
Excellent explanation.
Last edited by guitar/bass76 at May 25, 2011,
#11
I was wondering about this too since I want a Bass VI. From my research, I think it depends on the application. A lot of older tube bass amps such as Ampegs and Bassmans sound really good for guitars. They have similar wattages as guitar amps too. Some of the older amps also use regular 12" speakers commonly used for guitar speakers. Certain bass setups are identical to guitar setups and vice versa.
#12
So what about using an octave pedal to say... lay down a bass part of a loop you're recording? Can an octave pedal damage guitar amps?
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#13
Quote by Graham Simmons
So what about using an octave pedal to say... lay down a bass part of a loop you're recording? Can an octave pedal damage guitar amps?

I often wonder if over time, using a whammy pedal on the 1 octave down setting would damage my speakers. Sometimes they dont sound too happy if its high volume.. personally it seems risky because that the same range of the bass guitar and will make the same fundamental, so you might need to turn the bass down on the amp to be safe.
#14
I'm glad I bought this question up, I'm getting a lot of good answers.

Hell, I may plug my guitar into a bass setup just for shiggles and see if i can get any interesting tones