#1
To get straight to the point, I am wondering if there is anything I should keep in mind when it comes to mixing multiple guitar parts that are overlapped. I am working on a post-rock sort of outro for one of my songs, and instead of going with just traditional chords as I originally intended, I decided I would break down the chords and just play the individual notes on 5 different guitar tracks. I am mostly doing this for the harmonic value and just for a "bigger" sound as it is the climax of the song. The guitar tone I will be using consists of quite a bit of reverb, and there are some additional synth, drum, and bass tracks. Any thoughts would be nice, especially if you do post rock of some sort.
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#2
if the original chord would have had a lot of reverb, cut down the reverb on each individual track so it can add up to that. if you leave it at the same level, it might make it over the top. also, as a general rule, you dont want to use a lot of reverb. adding just enough that its noticeable is enough. more than that can make the track sound sloppy.

you're also going to want to eq each track slightly differently for that bigger sound. if you want it to sound more ambient, pan them slightly differently too. one of the best ways to get realism and fullness is to play each part twice (not duplicate the track) and pan one left and one right. eq them differently and play them through different cabs. and by doing this, you can all but cut the bass out. this tricks the ear into hearing bass and makes it sound a lot more full.

any of these will help you achieve your sound. but the biggest in mixing multiple guitars is eq-ing each differently. and cut the bass. you dont need it really in a full mix.
#3
don't use your amp's reverb, add it through what ever program you are using, as reverb through the amp is uncontrolable once it has been recorded.

i agree about not duplicating the track, play it a second time with a different guitar or amp, and mix to your ear's preference.

i've never attempted playing each note of a chord seperatly then mixing them together, I'm going to have to try this myself.
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#4
i've never attempted playing each note of a chord seperatly then mixing them together, I'm going to have to try this myself.


Yeah, neither have I. I thought it could be interesting, plus it makes for some relatively easy harmony styled guitars. If you want, I wouldn't mind sending you what it sounds like when I give it a shot.

Also, I understand that having two tracks for each individual riff section is usually recommended, but under these conditions would it be wise, or could it just muddy up the mix as well? I mean, having 5 riffs stacked over each other; then multiplying that by 2 = 10 guitar tracks for these light, post-rock riffs alone. By the end of this section when the crescendo finishes, there are drums, bass, synths, and an additional distorted rhythm guitar.

I suppose that is where my fear comes in with regards to mixing this. It just seems daunting. Additionally, just panning the tracks seems like it will kill me too. I look forward to giving it a shot though.
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#6
as opposed to adding reverb to every track, you could send each track to the same effects bus with your 'verb. or maybe 2 to one bus, and 3 to the other. because as was mentioned above, too much reverb is going to drown things out. might not work with what you have in mind, but it may be worth thinking about.

other than that, i say get some subtle (or not) differences in EQ so that each note has a place to sit. it sounds like the guitar is the focus of the climax (or part of it) so keep things panned fairly center. like root note up the middle and the other notes fanned out slightly so that not everything is right together.