#2
Quote by Ovation e148
Howzit ?!

How do one read chords on sheet music ?

Thx


Learn how to play the chords 1st..... recognize the names on the chart and play them.

If you have a question about a specific chord, Id be glad to give more specific advice.
shred is gaudy music
#3
Be aware that most commercial sheet music is transcribed using a piano and as such chord names listed are frequently not particularly "playable" on the guitar without doing a bit of research or modification.
I've often seen transcriptions showing very odd chord symbols for what is actually very simple music... the guy doing the transcription is dutifully writing down "passing" chords (where the artist is just moving his fingers from one guitar chord to another) without any real knowledge of how a guitar works.
#4
Unless its an inversion, triads follow a pattern of 1, 3, 5, 7, etc. on sheet music, they also follow a pattern

-----
0
-----
0
-----
0
-----
0
-----

So, unless its an inversion, learn the triad shapes, then all you need is to look at the root note.

P.s. I dont know about the patterns for minor triads and other things in common sheet music. When I write them, I keep the pattern, and label the flats.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#6
Hmmmm..... Still scratching

Maybe try this example for a practical explanation ?

This particular one has the chords written in on the sheet,but what do you do if it's not the case ? Or will GUITAR sheet music always have the chords in aswell ?

#7
learn how to build triads.. Major Minor Diminshed Augmented. -- stacking two thirds ontop of a root note.

then learn about added 7ths.

each 7 note scale will produce 7 individual chords for each note.
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#8
Quote by Ovation e148
Hmmmm..... Still scratching

Maybe try this example for a practical explanation ?

This particular one has the chords written in on the sheet,but what do you do if it's not the case ? Or will GUITAR sheet music always have the chords in aswell ?




It's piano music, they have 88 keys and 10 fingers. On guitar you have 6 strings and usually at best 4 fingers.

How do you know that you are proceeding slowly enough to be ready for that? The reason I ask, is if there arent any chords, I'd try to discern what might work simply by identifying the most likely tonal center, and considering how certain notes such as those on strong beats might be harmonized from the attending diatonic scale.

For example If I see a melody line that looks like it resolves on A and has the notes:

A C# A G D C# E F# G F# B G E

Then I can see the b7 of G, for example. I can see certain tendencies, I can use my knowledge of music to consider cadences, voice leading possibilities, inversions, etc.

I don't know what you know about theory but I could arrange this in any number of ways.

Best,

Sean
#9
Quote by Sean0913
It's piano music, they have 88 keys and 10 fingers. On guitar you have 6 strings and usually at best 4 fingers.

How do you know that you are proceeding slowly enough to be ready for that? The reason I ask, is if there arent any chords, I'd try to discern what might work simply by identifying the most likely tonal center, and considering how certain notes such as those on strong beats might be harmonized from the attending diatonic scale.

For example If I see a melody line that looks like it resolves on A and has the notes:

A C# A G D C# E F# G F# B G E

Then I can see the b7 of G, for example. I can see certain tendencies, I can use my knowledge of music to consider cadences, voice leading possibilities, inversions, etc.

I don't know what you know about theory but I could arrange this in any number of ways.

Best,

Sean


Thanks Sean.

Was wondering about a "look at the notes/listen to the piano and derive the chords from there..." type of approach...

And no ,I'm not NEARLY ready for that,was just wondering while looking at sheet music. Got a relatively bad finger injury (fretting hand,middle finger's wired at this stage) - playing's out/difficult at best for a while - ,so I'm spending time on theory. Will "see" you at your academy soon aswell....

Regards
#10
Quote by Ovation e148
Thanks Sean.

Was wondering about a "look at the notes/listen to the piano and derive the chords from there..." type of approach...

And no ,I'm not NEARLY ready for that,was just wondering while looking at sheet music. Got a relatively bad finger injury (fretting hand,middle finger's wired at this stage) - playing's out/difficult at best for a while - ,so I'm spending time on theory. Will "see" you at your academy soon aswell....

Regards


Sure, happy to help, here or there. You might also take a look at two lessons I wrote here on sheet music reading called "Throw the Boy Down The Well", you can find them in my profile under contributions. Both are just my take on things, but they can help in understanding chords and triads as found in sheet music. I wrote both of these upon request, and people seemed to really respond strongly to the material, which by no means is groundbreaking but it's helped a lot of people.

As for your hand...ouch, Im sorry to hear my brother!

Best,

Sean