#1
So basically me and a friend are doing a metal band, somewhat of a death metals nature. I am pretty much 100% rhythm, I don't really do melodies, solos, etc. etc. Because quite frankly I don't know where to start. Lately I've been studying (and by studying I just mean read over and play to) scales such a Harmonic Minor, Phrygian, as well Pentatonic minor, as wI am told those are very prevalent in most types of extreme metal. (I Play in Drop C, err wel technically modified drop d (CGCFAD)

So basically we are trying to get onto the level where we can abolish "rhythm" and "lead" specific parts. Basically I am trying to get better grip with things with my left hand, ive got the basics such as palm muting, trem picking, etc. etc. So I was hoping if the member of UG could point in the right direction, I guess in terms of playing style my goal is something along the lines of a band named Cephalic Carnage, obviously that's going to take a while to get to taht level, but I draw inspiration from band ssuch as Slayer (old stuff), Nile, Deicide, Dark Tranquillity, .Suffocation

I am willing to learn a little bit of theory just point me in the right direction I am decent riffer but im trying to go beyond power chords for lack of better words.
#2
If you're looking to really blur the lines between lead and rhythm playing, I can name two bands you'll want to look at.

Protest the Hero is one. They're not anything like Cephalic Carnage, but they're really technical and their guitar parts tend to blur the line between rhythm parts and solos pretty consistently. Their album Fortress is really good for that kind of playing, though if you're more into thrash and death metal, the vocals might not be to your liking.

The other is Between the Buried and Me. They lean a lot more towards the death metal side of things. Look at some of their songs on their album Colors. The entire album is a primer in technique and songwriting. As with Protest, their guitar lines tend to ignore traditional concepts of lead and rhythm.

Both bands are really technical, so you might not be up to that challenge. If they're not to your liking, then go ahead and try to learn a couple of songs by bands that are to your liking. Dark Tranquility's early stuff isn't too terribly complicated, as I recall. In Flames is similar to them, but less technical and leaning more towards melodic thrash than death metal at times, so you might try some of their songs out.

I hope that helps.
#3
Hmm Between the Buried and Me is good, but it almost seems to go out to sceamo type of nature?

Yes it's helpful but I'm more or less looking for possible guides, (video, paper, on here) on techniques and skills to play in lead. whenever i try to play other songs it seems like I am missing something, because naturally when im learning a new song, I slow it down at first (not to mention im playing in drop c so i transpose stuff a little too), and I can't help but feel if there is some sort technique or skill Im missing?
#4
Quote by gravatrax
Hmm Between the Buried and Me is good, but it almost seems to go out to sceamo type of nature?

Yes it's helpful but I'm more or less looking for possible guides, (video, paper, on here) on techniques and skills to play in lead. whenever i try to play other songs it seems like I am missing something, because naturally when im learning a new song, I slow it down at first (not to mention im playing in drop c so i transpose stuff a little too), and I can't help but feel if there is some sort technique or skill Im missing?


It goes absolutely nowhere near the screamo genre.

But I don't really understand your question, to play lead what you need to do is create riffs that ride upon what the rest of the band is doing but in a way that you drive the music, it isn't totally reliant on technique. Like when you have the rest of the band playing, I'd be thinking "what is it that I can do that will allow me to use my bandmates to elevate my playing to the front?" This is what I get from analyzing music anyway.

Oh and for an idea of what Geldin was talking about, take a gander at this very good Protest The Hero cover and see how the guitarists play off of each other.

Protest The Hero - Bloodmeat: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eqf8XK8buM
#5
Not to be a dick but I just have to point out Phrygians not a scale it's a mode and I doubt you want to dive that far into music theory. But if you don't already know, learn intervals then you can take any scale (or mode) you want and figure it out easily in any key. As for the technique just practice practice practice playing lead and learning your favorite solos.
#6
Between the Buried and Me were one of the first band's songs I tried learning when I started to get into more lead playing. I have to agree that their songs are great for improving technique as their riffs and solos will give you practice with different techniques and styles and can be pretty technical. They're also fun to play. The white walls solo has 3 string sweeps that are good for starting out. I also used the solo in Dechristianize by Vital Remains for learning sweeping.
#7
Forget about any scales apart from the major scale for the time being, that's the one you need to focus on. Brush up on your intervals and learn how to construct chords because that's what you're missing. Chords and scales are the same thing in essence, you string a couple of intervals together sequentially and you've got a scale fragment, play them simultaneously and it's a chord. Adding different intervals on top of an existing chord will change the sound and change how it functions musically. That might be you fretting another note, it might be the other guitarist playing a note, or even te vocalist singing a note...it all boils down to understanding how harmony works.

Also forget metal for the time being, if you want a textbook example of how to blur the lines learn Litte Wing. It's a lot easier to get a feel for how this stuff works without a load of drums and distortion getting in the way.
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#8
I'm still fairly clueless when it comes to things like chord progressions, key, etc. etc. Maybe I'm being a little too vague, I understand what I need to play (atleast in covering other songs, which isn't what I want to do, I'd much rather write my own stuff in teh long run), but I'm more worried about getting my fingers to move, accuracy, and speed.
#9
Hence why I recommended you take a look at those bands. What I was suggesting was that you look at how the bands I mentioned play the two guitars and the bass off one another.

Chord progressions are a little tough for beginner writers and composers. If you want to do that, you want to learn some theory. At that point, that Steven's advice and learn the major scale and how to form chords with that. Once you've got that down, look at the minor scale, which you can apply everything you know about the major scale to. Once you've got that, you'll have a rough understanding of how to work with intervals and how to construct a chord progression to your liking.

While you're doing that, try to analyze some of the songs you like. Most death metal and thrash metal tends to be fairly simple musically. Look at how bands you like use different progressions to achieve different tonalities.

As for technique, there is a marvelous sticky in this forum that can give you song suggestions for learning every technique you're likely to encounter.
#10
Quote by gravatrax
I'm still fairly clueless when it comes to things like chord progressions, key, etc. etc. Maybe I'm being a little too vague, I understand what I need to play (atleast in covering other songs, which isn't what I want to do, I'd much rather write my own stuff in teh long run), but I'm more worried about getting my fingers to move, accuracy, and speed.

In that case yes, I didn't really pick that up at all from your original post
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#11
Yeah my apologies, I was having some trouble wording it myself. But speed and accuracy is what I am trying to build open.

As for key signatures, modes, scales, interval, and chords I just barely scratch on, partially because like I said I'm a little clueless, I can't seem to find a good comprehensive guide on it. So I AM interested in learning theory, and applying it. Any suggestions? How to do intervals work? I know they're important to in death metal, to give it that evil sound, or maybe that's tonics....

**EDIT***

Thanks for the Advice Geldin, as well as everyone else I'll be sure to check it out. I think the only concern I have with learning scales is that I am actually learning to play them D tuning, my guitar is setup for drop but I usually turn the Low C to do, because it's e standard only a full step down, so transposing scales, is less awkward and their patterns are the same. I don't suppose in solos you really grab that low string that often, maybe in the lead/rythm parts but probably not solos

Right now I look at a scales, such as in whateer minor and kinda bass a simple riff off of the 2 lower strings, it seems to work fairly well for me, and im guessing since it's based on a scale it sounds more ahhh musical
Last edited by gravatrax at May 26, 2011,
#12
in that case its particularly important to learn the notes of a scale rather than just the shapes. Its not as hard as it sounds. Read 'The Crusade' from the technique sticky. Its how i learned.
#13
Hmmm, well essentially I tune up to standard D tuning, so scales are the same just two frets higher on the neck.

Thanks for the advice, but i err don't think Trivium is the playing style Im going for.

I've been using this website for the purposes of scales, pretty straight forward

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php
#14
I'm working on becoming a better lead player at the moment, I'm the first to admit I'm crap at theory and find it very hard to motivate myself to learn it but learning key signatures has really helped me.
#16
Ahhh woopsie. facedesks.

reading through now....

I remember how to read music for the most part, I played saxophone for about 4 years but quit because the thought of marching band killed me, kinda wish i studied jazz or something on my own tho, anyways I do not a little about reading music but in middle school they barely scratch the surface on things such as key sigs and wat not
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